A young solicitor travels to a remote village where he discovers that the vengeful ghost of a scorned woman is terrorizing the locals.

Director:

James Watkins

Writers:

Susan Hill (novel), Jane Goldman (screenplay)
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4,144 ( 391)
5 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Emma Shorey Emma Shorey ... Fisher Girl
Molly Harmon ... Fisher Girl
Ellisa Walker-Reid Ellisa Walker-Reid ... Fisher Girl
Sophie Stuckey ... Stella Kipps
Daniel Radcliffe ... Arthur Kipps
Misha Handley Misha Handley ... Joseph Kipps
Jessica Raine ... Nanny
Roger Allam ... Mr. Bentley
Lucy May Barker Lucy May Barker ... Nursemaid
Indira Ainger Indira Ainger ... Little Girl on Train
Andy Robb Andy Robb ... Doctor
Ciarán Hinds ... Sam Daily
Shaun Dooley ... Fisher
Mary Stockley ... Mrs. Fisher
Alexia Osborne Alexia Osborne ... Victoria Hardy
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Storyline

In London, solicitor Arthur Kipps still grieves over the death of his beloved wife Stella on the delivery of their son Joseph four years before. His employer gives him a last chance to keep his job, and he is assigned to travel to the remote village of Crythin Gifford to examine the documentation of the Eel Marsh House that belonged to the recently deceased Mrs. Drablow. Arthur befriends Daily on the train and the man offers a ride to him to the Gifford Arms inn. Arthur has a cold reception and the owner of the inn tells that he did not receive the request of reservation and there is no available room. The next morning, Arthur meets solicitor Jerome who advises him to return to London. However, Arthur goes to the isolated manor and soon he finds that Eel Marsh House is haunted by the vengeful ghost of a woman dressed in black. He also learns that the woman lost her son, drowned in the marsh, and she seeks revenge, taking the children of the terrified locals. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic material and violence/disturbing images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The boy who plays Daniel Radcliffe's son is his real godson, casting suggested by Radcliffe himself, which helped him establish an authentic relationship between father and son. See more »

Goofs

(around 59 minutes) When Arthur goes outside to investigate the knocking on the door, a light simulating the lightning can be seen reflected in the window to the right. See more »

Quotes

Joseph Kipps: [describing picture-drawing] That's me, that's Nanny, that's Mummy, that's you...
Arthur Kipps: Why do I look so sad?
Joseph Kipps: That's what your face looks like.
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Alternate Versions

The UK cinema version was cut visually by six seconds to secure a 12A rating. In addition to this, some substitutions were also made by the distributor. This included darkening some shots to reduce the impact of their graphic/horrific nature, and reducing the sound levels in others. Some of these cuts in particular apply to a hanging scene and a scene of self-immolation. See more »

Connections

Version of The Woman in Black (1989) See more »

Soundtracks

Die Frau in Schwarz - Titel
(uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
Life in Perspective
5 February 2012 | by bboyminnSee all my reviews

People have complained that this is a horror movie filled with horror movie clichés. But how could it not be? I mean is it suppose to be a horror movie at the local shopping mall? No, of course it is in a haunted house, were else would it be? As much as this movie drew on the horror standards, I found it refreshingly different from most horror movies. Part of what I want from a movie is something different, not more of the same, and I think in that respect, all things considered, this movie delivered.

While it did make use of the standards like jump scares, I really felt the suspense of this movie. I mean, at least for me, this movie was wound very tight. The suspense was ratcheted to the limit.

While I'm still not past Daniel Radcliffe's voice, I still hear Harry or Daniel, his face and body language were spot on, and greatly added to the tension of the movie.

In the end, it is what it is, a suspenseful horror movie that gets the job done. This isn't a genre noted for 'Academy Award' performances. But as suspenseful horror movies go, I was very satisfied with this one, and thought they did have a new approach to an old genre.

Steve B


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

UK | Canada | USA | Sweden

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 February 2012 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Woman in Black See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$20,874,072, 5 February 2012

Gross USA:

$54,333,290

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$128,955,898
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Datasat | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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