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The Big Short (2015)

Trailer
2:05 | Trailer
In 2006-2007 a group of investors bet against the US mortgage market. In their research they discover how flawed and corrupt the market is.

Director:

Adam McKay

Writers:

Charles Randolph (screenplay by), Adam McKay (screenplay by) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
450 ( 65)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 37 wins & 80 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ryan Gosling ... Jared Vennett
Rudy Eisenzopf ... Lewis Ranieri
Casey Groves ... Fund Manager
Charlie Talbert ... Lewis Bond Trader
Harold Gervais Harold Gervais ... Lewis Bond Trader
Maria Frangos Maria Frangos ... Exotic Dancer
Christian Bale ... Michael Burry
Hunter Burke ... Analyst
Bernard Hocke ... Coach
Shauna Rappold ... Michael Burry's Mom
Brandon Stacy ... Michael Burry's Dad
Aiden Flowers ... Young Michael Burry
Peter Epstein ... Paul Baum
Anthony Marble ... Therapy Businessman
Silas Cooper ... Therapy Businessman
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Storyline

Three separate but parallel stories of the U.S mortgage housing crisis of 2005 are told. Michael Burry, an eccentric ex-physician turned one-eyed Scion Capital hedge fund manager, has traded traditional office attire for shorts, bare feet and a Supercuts haircut. He believes that the US housing market is built on a bubble that will burst within the next few years. Autonomy within the company allows Burry to do largely as he pleases, so Burry proceeds to bet against the housing market with the banks, who are more than happy to accept his proposal for something that has never happened in American history. The banks believe that Burry is a crackpot and therefore are confident in that they will win the deal. Jared Vennett with Deutschebank gets wind of what Burry is doing and, as an investor believes he too can cash in on Burry's beliefs. An errant telephone call to FrontPoint Partners gets this information into the hands of Mark Baum, an idealist who is fed up with the corruption in the ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Shocking, powerful, unbelievable, and it's true See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive language and some sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

Jared Vennett receives a bonus check that spells 40 "fourty." See more »

Quotes

Vinnie Daniel: How are you f***ing us?
Jared Vennett: When you come for the payday, I'm gonna rip your eyes out. I'm gonna make a fortune. The good news is Vinnie, you're not going to care cause you're gonna make so much money. That's what I get out of it. Wanna know what you get out of it? You get the ice cream, the hot fudge, the banana and the nuts. Right now I get the sprinkles, and ya - if this goes thru, I get the cherry. But you get the sundae Vinny. You get the sundae.
Vinnie Daniel: All right. I buy that. Thank you.
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Connections

Featured in Conan: Ed Helms/Noel Fielding/Purity Ring (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Lagrimas Negras
Written by Miguel Matamoros (as Miguel Matamoros Sr.)
Performed by Barbarito Torres
Courtesy of Pimienta Records
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User Reviews

 
Smart Greed
28 December 2015 | by JackCerfSee all my reviews

Harry Knowles once wrote a review of Das Boot that said the movie was so well made that you'd find yourself rooting for Nazi sailors trying to sink American ships. So here. You find yourself rooting for clever "outsiders and weirdos," as one of them puts it, who saw what nobody else wanted to see -- that an immense structure of mortgage based securities was doomed to collapse because it rested on the backs of subprime borrowers who couldn't support the weight and should never have been loaned the money. We have been taught by generations of fiction to identify with characters who are outsiders and rebels. Because these guys are smart, because they are antisocial and because they were laughed at by smug fools who believed the conventional wisdom, you identify with them, and you wait anxiously for their vindication. Then you realize that their vindication means the collapse of the American economy. They were the guys on the Titanic who knew what the iceberg meant and booked reserved seats in the lifeboats.

Michael Lewis, from whose book the movie was adapted, got his training at Salomon Brothers in the mid-80s, as mortgage based securities were being invented. (There's an early shout-out to Lew Ranieri, the Salomon trader who invented them.) As anyone knows who's read Lewis's memoir of those days, Liar's Poker, the culture at Salomon was that your job was to be smarter than everybody else in the bond market, understand values better, and know what other traders were going to do before they knew it themselves. If you were smart enough, you deserved whatever you took away from somebody less smart on the other side of the trade. That's why Lewis admires his protagonists and that, despite a thick coating of moral outrage, is the heart of the movie. The guys who shorted the housing market weren't any more virtuous or less greedy than the great majority of complacent, conventionally minded bankers who believed that the trees would keep growing all the way up to the sky. They just saw more clearly and had plenty of nerve and faith in their own judgment. If they had been wrong, as shorts often are, they and their clients would have been wiped out. When they turned out right, they took the money and kept it, even if some of them felt guilty about it.

I know somewhat about this area, having litigated some of the aftermath. The celebrity cameo explanations of subprime debt, collateralized debt obligations, and synthetic CDOs are not only simple but accurate -- the two involving Anthony Bourdain and Selena Gomez are downright elegant. The key concept of the credit default swap comes out nicely through the dialogue -- a chance to buy fire insurance on the house down the street just before it catches fire. There are a couple of more points that could have used the same thing, especially when people start talking about "FICO scores." It could also have been a little more clear that the eventual collapse was delayed because the smarter investment banks like Goldman finally woke up, saw it coming, unloaded their CDO inventory on investors who were still asleep, and cut their losses by buying swaps themselves. But this is a smart, entertaining telling of an outrageous true story. It deserves all the praise it has gotten, and maybe an Oscar for best adapted screenplay. If it teaches people without a financial background a little of what went on, it will be more than a momentary entertainment. But it will certainly entertain.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 December 2015 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Big Short See more »

Filming Locations:

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$28,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$705,527, 13 December 2015

Gross USA:

$70,259,870

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$133,440,870
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | Datasat | DTS (DTS: X)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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