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Lockout (2012)

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2:25 | Trailer

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ON DISC
A man wrongly convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage against the U.S. is offered his freedom if he can rescue the president's daughter from an outer space prison taken over by violent inmates.

Directors:

Steve Saint Leger (as Stephen Saint Leger), James Mather

Writers:

James Mather (screenplay by), Steve Saint Leger (screenplay by) (as Stephen Saint Leger) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
4,977 ( 162)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Guy Pearce ... Snow
Maggie Grace ... Emilie Warnock
Vincent Regan ... Alex
Joseph Gilgun ... Hydell
Lennie James ... Harry Shaw
Peter Stormare ... Scott Langral
Jacky Ido ... Hock
Tim Plester ... John James Mace
Mark Tankersley Mark Tankersley ... Barnes
Anne-Solenne Hatte Anne-Solenne Hatte ... Kathryn
Peter Hudson ... President Warnock
Nick Hardin ... Hostage Negotiator
Dan Savier Dan Savier ... Duke
Damijan Oklopdzic Damijan Oklopdzic ... Slick
Bojan Peric Bojan Peric ... LOPD Technician 1
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Storyline

In 2079, in Washington, the ex-CIA Operative Snow is brutally interrogated, accused of treason against the United States. The chief of the secret service Scott Langral believes that he shot the agent Frank in a hotel room. Meanwhile, the idealistic daughter of the president of the USA, Emilie Warnock, is visiting MS One, a maximum security prison in outer space expecting to find evidence that the prisoners are actually guinea pigs of a huge corporation. When one of her bodyguards loses a hidden pistol to the dangerous prisoner Hydell, he subdues the staff in the central control room and releases the prisoners, including his brother Alex who becomes the leader of the riot. Now the veteran agent Harry Shaw offers freedom to Snow if he succeeds in rescuing the president's daughter. But the idealistic Emilie does not want to leave MS-One without the hostages. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Take no prisoners.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, and language including some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

France

Language:

English | Ukrainian | Latin

Release Date:

13 April 2012 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Lock-Out See more »

Filming Locations:

Belgrade, Serbia See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,231,836, 15 April 2012, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$14,326,864, 9 July 2012

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$32,204,030, 13 February 2013
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

EuropaCorp,Canal+,Ciné+ See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

SDDS | DTS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Snow's first name is revealed to be Marion. This was also Sylvester Stallone's character name in Cobra (1986). See more »

Goofs

When the station is scuttled via (presumably) nuclear warhead, there is close to no chance that Snow and Emilie would have survived the hail of debris. The atmospheric densities at such altitudes are very low, which means that it is easy to attain high velocities due to the lack of significant drag. Emilie was seen getting hit in the back by a large piece of metal, and for comparison the ISS performs maneuvers to avoid debris as small as 10 cm in size due to the kinetic energy it carries. While their suits may have protected them from burning up in the atmosphere, their distance to the station at the time of detonation makes survival extremely unlikely. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Langral: Again, what happened in that hotel room?
Snow: Oh, it was coupon night and I was trampolining your wife.
[Snow is punched in the face]
Langral: You're a real comedian aren't you, Snow?
Snow: Well I guess that's why they call it the punch line.
[Snow is punched again]
Langral: You don't like me, do you?
Snow: Don't flatter yourself. I don't like anybody.
Langral: With that attitude, I can see why nobody likes you.
[...]
See more »

Alternate Versions

Available on DVD in a Unrated version that restores violence cuts for a PG-13 rating. The Unrated version is the only version included on Retail DVD/Blu-ray. But Redbox and Rental versions still carry the PG-13 cut. For instance in the Unrated cut, one can clearly see Snow shooting a person in the mouth which is not shown in the PG-13 cut. See more »


Soundtracks

Beat City
Written by Sune Wagner
Performed by The Raveonettes
(c) Crunchy Tunes USA Administered by Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd
(p) 2002 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.
With Courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment France
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Thinks it's more fun than it is, but 'Lockout' is still effective
14 April 2012 | by Movie_Muse_ReviewsSee all my reviews

It's fair to say Luc Besson has gotten a bit giddy ever since "Taken." The man who once upon a time brought us "La Femme Nikita" and "Leon: The Professional" has instead taken to lighter action fare, in this case recruiting amateurs James Mather and Stephen St. Leger to help write and direct his "original idea." Exactly—not a "story by" credit, but "original idea."

That's not to say "Lockout" isn't creative, but it's definitely not original. Some might dub it "Taken in space," especially considering it borrows that film's starlet in Maggie Grace, but it's much more akin to "Escape from New York in space." Either way, "Lockout" is another simple- concept action film from Besson, only it has a bigger ego that gets in the way sometimes.

"Lockout" is good for kicks, a fact of which it's very aware. Guy Pearce's Snow, the morally questionable and reluctant hero written so closely to the archetype he almost transcends it, weirdly. He has a sense of humor best described as abundant (though sometimes quite clever), and Pearce plays him especially wry; most actors (think Nicolas Cage) would've hammed it up too much or been unconvincing.

Snow is tasked with rescuing the president's daughter (Grace), who is stuck on a maximum security prison in space that has incurred a major security breach. These are the world's most dangerous criminals, plus they have been in stasis for any number of years, which has made them even nuttier. Joseph Gilgun as Rydell, one of two Scottish prisoners trying to run the uprising, is a particularly deranged fellow reminiscent of a demented Groundskeeper Willie.

Both Rydell and the other main baddie, Alex (Vincent Regan), have a cold-blooded edge that could have made for an effective R-rated ransom thriller reminiscent of late '90s films like Air Force One, but the devil-may-care attitude of the entire movie ultimately clashes with these darker moments, even though they do make you take the movie more seriously than you would otherwise.

After a little bit of context at the beginning to properly motivate Snow, both he and us are effectively shot from a canon. The story only slows down a bit toward the end, but it mostly plays out as a series of dominoes. The action doesn't satisfy so much as the pace and the threat of violence (now here's a good example of how you do PG-13 violence), but it's well done aside from an opening motorcycle sequence shot on green screen and outfitted with an effects job that really shows the budget.

Aside from that, the futuristic sci-fi elements stay pretty classy—nothing overdone or distracting. The gadgets provide some creativity to a number of the sequences and the script manages to inject some unpredictability into a story that could not have a more obvious trajectory.

Despite the self-awareness at points, with a lot of that credit going to Pearce, Lockout tries especially hard to be entertaining on too many fronts, aspiring to be the consummate popcorn flick rather than just identifying one tone and sticking with it. The final scene on the space prison strangely evokes the original "Star Wars" Death Star run, as if to make sure the audience gets to munch on some sci fi/fantasy before the credits roll.

It's hard to fault "Lockout" for aiming to please considering that that spirit seems to be the driving force behind the movie's strengths as well as its weaknesses. Although the number of attempts at humor might catch some folks off guard, "Lockout" offers what anyone interested in the film would expect, if for no other reason than its built upon tons of tropes from previously effective movies. In turn, "Lockout" is effective, but not too much more.

~Steven C

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