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Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the early 2010s, including ‘Skyfall,’ ‘Let It Go’

Oscar Flashback: Best Original Songs of the early 2010s, including ‘Skyfall,’ ‘Let It Go’
This article marks Part 25 of the Gold Derby series analyzing 84 years of Best Original Song at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at the timeless tunes recognized in this category, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the winners.

The 2010 Oscar nominees in Best Original Song were:

“Coming Home” from “Country Strong”

“If I Rise” from “127 Hours

“I See the Light” from “Tangled

We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3

Won: “We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3

Should’ve won: “If I Rise” from “127 Hours

Best Original Song in 2010 marked one of the most deadly-dull line-ups to ever grace the category, a sleepy, entirely unremarkable batch of four songs that is exceedingly difficult to select a favorite among.

Voters, faced with this anemic foursome, opted to go with Oscar mainstay Randy Newman, awarding him a second Best Original Song prize, this time for “We Belong Together.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film News Roundup: Environmental Doc ‘The Human Element’ Set for January

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: Environmental Doc ‘The Human Element’ Set for January
In today’s film news roundup, environmental documentary “The Human Element” and romancer “Frank and Ava” get release dates and NBA player Dwight Howard backs Christopher Walken’s “Percy.”

Release Dates

The Orchard has set a Jan. 29 digital release date for James Balog’s environmental documentary “The Human Element,” Variety has learned exclusively.

Balog uses his camera to reveal how environmental change is affecting the lives of everyday Americans. Following the four classical elements — air, earth, fire and water— to frame his journey, Balog explores wildfires, hurricanes, sea level rise, coal mining, and the changes in the air we breathe. “The Human Element” is aimed as providing inspiration for a more balanced relationship between humanity and nature.

Balog’s previous film “Chasing Ice” was awarded an Emmy for outstanding nature programming. “The Human Element” is produced by Earth Vision. Here’s the trailer:

****

8th House Entertainment is releasing “Frank and Ava,
See full article at Variety »

‘The Devil We Know’ Trailer: Sundance Exposé on Dupont’s Cover-Up of Teflon’s Harmful Environmental Effects

‘The Devil We Know’ Trailer: Sundance Exposé on Dupont’s Cover-Up of Teflon’s Harmful Environmental Effects
Following “An Inconvenient Sequel,” “The Cove,” and “Chasing Ice,” a pointed and thorough environmental documentary can have a lasting impact on the global conversation around pollution and climate change. Three-time Sundance filmmaker Stephanie Soechtig has been a leading voice in the genre, and adds yet another environmental atrocity to the pile in her fourth feature film, “The Devil We Know.” The film takes aim at powerful corporations such as Dupont and 3M, following a group of West Virginia whistleblowers who claim both companies knew of the harmful environmental properties of the patented chemical Teflon, and covered it up for decades.

Per the official synopsis: “Unraveling one of the biggest environmental scandals of our time, a group of citizens in West Virginia take on a powerful corporation after they discover it has knowingly been dumping a toxic chemical – now found in the blood of 99.7% of Americans – into the drinking water supply.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Chasing Coral’ Director Is Confident There Will Be a Climate Change Solution: ‘We Have No Choice Other Than to Solve It’

‘Chasing Coral’ Director Is Confident There Will Be a Climate Change Solution: ‘We Have No Choice Other Than to Solve It’
For a time, “Chasing Coral” director Jeff Orlowski was worried he wouldn’t actually be able to capture the climax of his film.

Thanks to technical malfunctions and other mishaps, which are documented in the film, he and his team weren’t able to capture the coral bleaching they set out to record. After a showing of the movie at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series, he told IndieWire Special Projects Editor Steve Greene that he expected to finish it an entire year before he actually completed it.

Read More:‘An Inconvenient Sequel’ Filmmakers on Modifying Their Film After Donald Trump’s Climate Policy Changes

“We weren’t capturing the bleaching and the cameras didn’t work,” he said in a post-film Q&A. “We knew that, unfortunately for the planet, more opportunities were coming up, that the bleaching was only scheduled to continue, and that’s what
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Oscar Underdogs Who Stand the Best Chance at Gold

10 Oscar Underdogs Who Stand the Best Chance at Gold
Ten months into the year, it’s hard out here for an Oscar contender. Being worthy of remembering, or being watched by Academy members, demands a warm film-festival reception, rave reviews, effective marketing and distribution, strong theater attendance, and word of mouth. Check out this curated (alphabetical) selection of long-shot performers who are worthy of Oscar consideration, but may see their movies get lost in the intense competitive awards shuffle.

1. Bryan Cranston

Category: Best Actor

Awards: Nominated for Best Actor by SAG and the Oscars for “Trumbo,” Cranston won three Best Actor in a Drama Emmys for playing Walter White in “Breaking Bad” and won SAG Best Actor in TV movie as Lbj in “All the Way.”

Last Hit: “Why Him?” ($60 million domestic)

Title: “Last Flag Flying” (Amazon Studios)

Bottom Line: This layered New York Film Festival opener stars Cranston in one of his signature large, colorful, entertaining performances as Sal,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

10 Oscar Underdogs Who Stand the Best Chance at Gold

10 Oscar Underdogs Who Stand the Best Chance at Gold
Ten months into the year, it’s hard out here for an Oscar contender. Being worthy of remembering, or being watched by Academy members, demands a warm film-festival reception, rave reviews, effective marketing and distribution, strong theater attendance, and word of mouth. Check out this curated (alphabetical) selection of long-shot performers who are worthy of Oscar consideration, but may see their movies get lost in the intense competitive awards shuffle.

1. Bryan Cranston

Category: Best Actor

Awards: Nominated for Best Actor by SAG and the Oscars for “Trumbo,” Cranston won three Best Actor in a Drama Emmys for playing Walter White in “Breaking Bad” and won SAG Best Actor in TV movie as Lbj in “All the Way.”

Last Hit: “Why Him?” ($60 million domestic)

Title: “Last Flag Flying” (Amazon Studios)

Bottom Line: This layered New York Film Festival opener stars Cranston in one of his signature large, colorful, entertaining performances as Sal,
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese
Netflix is adding two new documentaries to its crowded 2017 roster: “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.” and “Voyeur,” both of which will premiere at the 55th New York Film Festival and launch globally on Netflix later this year.

Read More:Documentary, Now: Three Rock Stars Who Run The Fast-Changing Nonfiction World

Author Joan Didion’s nephew, actor-director-producer Griffin Dunne, has been laboring on this portrait of his aunt for years. The film spans more than 50 years of essays, novels, screenplays, and criticism, as Didion chronicled America’s cultural and political tides, from the literati scene of New York in the 1950s and early ’60s to her home state of California, where she wrote “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” and “The White Album” and such film scripts as “The Panic in Needle Park.”

Dunne unearths a trove of archival footage and interviews his aunt at length about the many people she met and
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese

Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese
Netflix is adding two new documentaries to its crowded 2017 roster: “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.” and “Voyeur,” both of which will premiere at the 55th New York Film Festival and launch globally on Netflix later this year.

Read More:Documentary, Now: Three Rock Stars Who Run The Fast-Changing Nonfiction World

Author Joan Didion’s nephew, actor-director-producer Griffin Dunne, has been laboring on this portrait of his aunt for years. The film spans more than 50 years of essays, novels, screenplays, and criticism, as Didion chronicled America’s cultural and political tides, from the literati scene of New York in the 1950s and early ’60s to her home state of California, where she wrote “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” and “The White Album” and such film scripts as “The Panic in Needle Park.”

Dunne unearths a trove of archival footage and interviews his aunt at length about the many people she met and
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Chasing Coral’ Review: Environmental Doc Exposes Oceanic Crisis

‘Chasing Coral’ Review: Environmental Doc Exposes Oceanic Crisis
Jeff Orlowski is chronicling change. In “Chasing Ice,” he followed National Geographic photographer James Balog as he set out to capture shifting glaciers. Orlowski’s latest, “Chasing Coral,” sees the director diving headfirst into another obsession: the vanishing act of the world’s coral reefs. Our entry point into the abyss is a team of motivated and knowledgeable divers, photographers and scientists. Collectively, they’ve decided to embark on a mission to understand why these reefs are disintegrating. It is, from the get-go, a somber pursuit. Many of the team members are fully aware of how our coral reefs got to this place,
See full article at The Wrap »

Movie Review: Seeing is believing in the wrenchingly illustrative climate doc Chasing Coral

Scientists overwhelmingly agree that humanity’s enormous carbon footprint is potentially disastrous, but reading peer-reviewed papers with titles like “Attributing Physical And Biological Impacts To Anthropogenic Climate Change” doesn’t exactly stir the blood. Even Al Gore’s PowerPoint lecture in An Inconvenient Truth (which has a sequel forthcoming in just a few weeks), with its onslaught of facts and figures, skews a little dry. Seeking to provide a more visceral sense of the danger, documentary filmmaker Jeff Orlowski has spent much of the past decade training cameras on natural phenomena that are vanishing at an alarming rate. His first feature, 2012’s Chasing Ice, employed time-lapse photography to show the speedy disappearance of various Arctic glaciers, and was almost as visually stunning as it was disturbing. Now, Orlowski has made a sequel of sorts, Chasing Coral, which offers a similarly majestic/bleak look at the effect of rising ocean ...
See full article at The AV Club »

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Documentary Feature

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Documentary Feature
Getting out early can be an advantage in the documentary race, which is often front loaded at January’s Sundance Film Festival. While a raft of movies made their mark, the question is which ones can sustain support through the end of the year.

Among that festival’s breakouts were three Syria documentaries. Daring and timely “City of Ghosts” (July 14, A & E/Amazon Studios), which is Matthew Heineman’s follow-up to his Oscar-nominated border drug war thriller “Cartel Land,” will get a major push. Any footage from Syria came from the fearless Raqqa journalists he tracked through Turkey and Germany, where they discover that they are not necessarily safe — anywhere.

It remains to be seen if there will be room for more than one Syrian documentary. HBO Documentary Films is forgoing Emmy consideration for “Winter on Fire” nominee Evgeny Afineevsky’s harrowing “Cries From Syria” (March 10, HBO), planning an Oscar push this fall.
See full article at Indiewire »

Must Watch: Official Trailer for Powerful Documentary 'Chasing Coral'

"Our oceans are dramatically changing and we are losing coral reefs on a global scale." So sad. Netflix has debuted the official trailer for the extraordinary documentary Chasing Coral, in celebration of World Oceans Day today. This amazing doc is the follow-up to Chasing Ice, also profiling the devastating effects of climate change. This time filmmaker Jeff Orlowski dives underwater to show use firsthand what's happening to the coral reefs on this planet. He spent three years with "divers, underwater photographers, and experts to reveal the majesty of our oceans, and the rapidly changing reality we're facing." I saw this at its premiere at Sundance and totally fell for it (read my glowing review). It made me cry with tears of frustration, and happiness, because it's a beautifully-made film - the best climate doc I've seen in years (I've seen them all). Here's the official trailer (+ poster) for Jeff Orlowski's documentary Chasing Coral,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

'Chasing Coral', 'Icarus' directors on why they struck deals with Netflix

'Chasing Coral', 'Icarus' directors on why they struck deals with Netflix
Bryan Fogel and Jeff Orlowski explain the appeal of Netflix for doc-makers.

Documentary-makers heading to Sheffield Doc/Fest this weekend with Netflix-backed films have said there is “no silver bullet” to quell distribution dilemmas casting a shadow over factual programming.

The distribution landscape for non-fiction docs and series has transformed radically in the past five years due to SVoD entrants flush with cash, leaving many directors with issue-driven projects struggling to identify the best outlets.

Speaking at a Sundance London event last week, directors Bryan Fogel (Icarus) and Jeff Orlowski (Chasing Coral) both said they “laboured over” selling their films to Netflix in lieu of traditional broadcast deals.

“I wanted the film to be truly seen,” said Fogel. “Netflix presses a button and it’s in 190 countries. You know that literally millions of people will see your film.”

Netflix’s reported $5m (£3.85m) deal for Icarus is at the top end of what it will pay for
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Chasing Coral', 'Icarius' directors on why they struck deals with Netflix

'Chasing Coral', 'Icarius' directors on why they struck deals with Netflix
Bryan Fogel and Jeff Orlowski explain the appeal of Netflix for doc-makers.

Documentary-makers heading to Sheffield Doc/Fest this weekend with Netflix-backed films have said there is “no silver bullet” to quell distribution dilemmas casting a shadow over factual programming.

The distribution landscape for non-fiction docs and series has transformed radically in the past five years due to SVoD entrants flush with cash, leaving many directors with issue-driven projects struggling to identify the best outlets.

Speaking at a Sundance London event last week, directors Bryan Fogel (Icarus) and Jeff Orlowski (Chasing Coral) both said they “laboured over” selling their films to Netflix in lieu of traditional broadcast deals.

“I wanted the film to be truly seen,” said Fogel. “Netflix presses a button and it’s in 190 countries. You know that literally millions of people will see your film.”

Netflix’s reported $5m (£3.85m) deal for Icarus is at the top end of what it will pay for
See full article at ScreenDaily »

2018 Oscar Predictions

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Picture

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Director

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Actor

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Actress

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Supporting Actress

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Supporting Actress

It’s early days yet, we know. But awards season 2018 got started at Sundance, and will continue at Cannes.

Check out our early speculation, based on credible filmmakers, promising ensembles and Oscar-savvy distributors, of what might be in store when the next award season rolls around in the fall of 2017.

Sundance introduced the first potential feature contenders: Michael Showalter’s big Amazon Studios sale, “The Big Sick,” a true romance starring writer-actor Kumail Nanjani, as well as Geremy Jasper’s New Jersey rap musical “Patti Cake$” (Fox Searchlight), starring breakout Australian actress Danielle MacDonald and returning veteran Cathy Moriarty (“Raging Bull”), Sony Pictures Classics’ elegiac gay romance “Call Me By Your Name” , directed by Luca Guadagnino and starring Armie Hammer, “Homeland” breakout Timothée Chalamet,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Chasing Coral’ Review: Gorgeous Underwater Exploration is ‘The War Room’ for Environmental Advocacy Docs — Sundance 2017

‘Chasing Coral’ Review: Gorgeous Underwater Exploration is ‘The War Room’ for Environmental Advocacy Docs — Sundance 2017
Coral has a branding problem, if you will. Like a beautiful sunset over a pollution-choked city, some of the most striking images of underwater ecosystems stem from environmental mistreatment. If you’ve ever seen an ocean shot of pristine white reefs contrasting the blue of the water, you might be looking at an impending graveyard. “Chasing Coral” (which follows director Jeff Orlowski’s glacier erosion chronicle, “Chasing Ice”) takes that optics problem head on. In the process, his environmental film becomes something akin to a behind-the-scenes look at a political campaign. How do you meld the larger cause with individual efforts to sway the public into action?

Like other conservation docs (this year’s Sundance has an entire program devoted to climate), “Chasing Coral” features a heavy dose of natural majesty. In addition to the hi-res footage you’d expect from a ocean-centric portrait (clownfish and anemone fans will be
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Chasing Coral’ Director Jeff Orlowski On “Very Real” Dangers Of Climate Change – Sundance Studio

‘Chasing Coral’ Director Jeff Orlowski On “Very Real” Dangers Of Climate Change – Sundance Studio
The inaugural Sundance Institute Discovery Impact Fellow for environmental filmmaking, Chasing Coral helmer Jeff Orlowski saw his last documentary, Chasing Ice, receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song, and screen for Congress, the White House and the Un. Chasing Coral, his "thematic sequel" to that film, has been acquired by Netflix and employs world-class photographic technology to capture the rapid disappearance of coral reefs across the…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Sundance 2017: Heartbreaking, Urgent Documentary 'Chasing Coral'

I didn't think watching amazing footage of coral dying would make me so emotional, but it did. I was wiping away tears through this fantastic documentary, Chasing Coral, the follow-up to Jeff Orlowski's Chasing Ice. Orlowski is a very passionate, extremely talented filmmaker who not only dives deep into his projects, but knows how to make an engaging and encouraging documentary. Chasing Coral documents Orlowski's mission to capture time-lapse footage of coral in the ocean being bleached due to rising water temperature, which is caused by the excessive amount of fossil fuels we're burning. Not only does he get the footage, he crafts a gripping narrative around chasing coral and ends with a enthusiastic call for action. Go see this doc. I've seen pretty much every last climate documentary made over the last few years, and many of them are too depressing or don't have enough hope in them
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Sundance: Netflix acquires 'Chasing Coral'

The streaming giant is acquiring worldwide rights from Submarine to Jeff Orlowski’s U.S. Documentary Competition selection following its premiere on Saturday.

Netflix plans a release later this year on the Exposure Labs production that marks Orlowski’s second feature after Sundance 2012 documentary Chasing Ice.

Chasing Coral centres on the collaboration between an ad man, a coral expert, cutting-edge camera designers and renowned marine biologists as they invent the first time-lapse camera to record coral bleaching events.

The group battles technical malfunctions and nature in pursuit of their goal.

The documentary was produced in association with Argent Pictures and The Kendeda Fund and in partnership with The Ocean Agency and View Into the Blue. David J. Cornfield, Linda A. Cornfield, Ryan W. Ahrens, and Jill K. Ahrens served as executive producers.

Chasing Coral is a stunning cinematic achievement,” said Lisa Nishimura, Netflix’s vice-president of original documentaries. “Jeff has captured a beautiful view under the ocean
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Netflix Acquires Climate Change Documentary ‘Chasing Coral’ — Sundance 2017

  • Indiewire
Netflix has acquired the worldwide rights to the documentary “Chasing Coral.” The film focuses on the destruction of coral reefs as a result of climate change, and is the second doc centered on the effects of global warming for filmmaker Jeff Orlowski, whose previous film was 2012’s “Chasing Ice.”

Read More: Sundance Film Festival Box Office Suffers Cyberattack

Chasing Coral” follows a team of divers, photographers and scientists who set out on an ocean adventure and invent the first time-lapse camera to record coral bleaching events as they happen. The purchase comes the same day as the doc’s premiere Saturday in Sundance’s U.S. Documentary Competition, and two days after the premiere of “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power,” the follow-up to former vice president Al Gore’s 2006’s “An Inconvenient Truth.” Netflix plans to release “Chasing Coral” later this year.

“Jeff has captured a beautiful view under the ocean seldom seen,
See full article at Indiewire »
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