7.5/10
10,619
106 user 99 critic

Waiting for 'Superman' (2010)

Trailer
2:35 | Trailer
An examination of the current state of education in America today.

Director:

Davis Guggenheim
16 wins & 28 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Credited cast:
Charles Adams Charles Adams ... Self
Jonathan Alter ... Self
Robert Balfanz Robert Balfanz ... Self
Harriet Ball Harriet Ball ... Self
Steve Barr Steve Barr ... Self
Ms. Celeste Bell Ms. Celeste Bell ... Self
The Black & McGee Family The Black & McGee Family ... Themselves
Geoffrey Canada ... Self
James Carter III James Carter III ... Self
Todd Dickson Todd Dickson ... Self
The Esparza Family The Esparza Family ... Themselves
Mike Feinberg Mike Feinberg ... Self
Adrian M. Fenty Adrian M. Fenty ... Self (as Adrian Fenty)
Howard Fuller Howard Fuller ... Self
The Garcia Regalado Family The Garcia Regalado Family ... Themselves
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Storyline

Filmmaker Davis Guggenheim reminds us that education "statistics" have names: Anthony, Francisco, Bianca, Daisy, and Emily, whose stories make up the engrossing foundation of WAITING FOR SUPERMAN. As he follows a handful of promising kids through a system that inhibits, rather than encourages, academic growth, Guggenheim undertakes an exhaustive review of public education, surveying "drop-out factories" and "academic sinkholes," methodically dissecting the system and its seemingly intractable problems. Written by Sundance Film Festival

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The fate of our country won't be decided on a battlefield, it will be determined in a classroom.

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some thematic material, mild language and incidental smoking | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There is a scene in which Bianca, one of the little girls, is reading from a book about someone taking apples and bringing them into the city to sell. The book she is reading is called "The Giving Tree" written by Shel Silverstein. See more »

Quotes

Geoffrey Canada: I was like what do you mean he's not real. And she thought I was crying because it's like Santa Claus is not real and I was crying because there was no one coming with enough power to save us.
See more »

Connections

Features Leave It to Beaver (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

Gonna Get Along Without Ya Now
Written by Russell Alan Wier
Performed by Patience & Prudence
Courtesy of Capitol Records
Under license from EMI Film & Television Music
See more »

User Reviews

 
This stirring documentary sends out shock-waves of injustice
24 September 2010 | by DoveFoundationSee all my reviews

This stirring documentary sends out shock-waves of injustice and even a bit of a sense of futility when it explores the state of America's public schools. Interviews with education specialists, school superintendents and even Bill Gates add up to an impressive assembly of informed adults who know what the problem is, but haven't figured out a way to fix it on a large scale.

Washington, D.C. schools superintendent Michelle Rhee says it well when she summarizes the basic problem: "Public schools fail when children's education becomes about the adults." The adults who fail these children are not limited to public officials and government bureaucrats, though; a large portion of the blame is reserved for ineffective teachers and the teachers' unions who ensure that those teachers receive tenure and cannot be removed from schools. The documentary focuses on five public school children who represent inner-city kids with broken families and day-to-day financial struggles (except for a student of middle-class parents in the Silicon Valley). With that one exception, all are enrolled in failing public elementary schools and have little chance of graduating high school if they move on to the assigned secondary schools in their districts. The tear-jerking climax sees each of the kids attending a lottery drawing for limited spaces at public charter schools and rare, effective public schools within or outside of their district. Witnessing the academic chances for these kids being decided by such a random, impersonal process is heart-breaking and calls into question the very nature of American values like "Protestant work ethic," "equality," "freedom" and "the ability to pull oneself up by one's bootstraps" and make the future brighter.

The language is limited to a few expletives. The film deals with a tangled web of adult issues that make a child's education more difficult, which probably puts it outside the spectrum of interest for most kids under age 12. However, when watched with parents, it could create some valuable family discussions on the importance of education and may even activate a family to become advocates for change. We award "Waiting for Superman" the Dove Family-Approved Seal for audiences over age 12 and praise the filmmakers for presenting many teachable moments.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

29 October 2010 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Waiting for 'Superman' See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$139,033, 26 September 2010

Gross USA:

$6,417,135

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$6,433,688
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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