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Dionne Warwick Doc in the Works

Dionne Warwick: Live in Concert”

“I Say a Little Prayer,” “Walk on By,” “Do You Know the Way to San Jose” — these are the kinds of songs that inspire strangers to sing together, with or without alcohol. And these are just three of Dionne Warwick’s many hits. “Don’t Make Me Over,” a new documentary film about the legendary songstress, is in the works. Variety reports that “David Garrett’s Mister Smith Entertainment will launch sales on the film and present select footage to international buyers at next month’s Cannes Market.”

Between 1962 and 1998, 69 of Warwick’s singles made the Billboard Hot 100. She is the second most-charted female vocalist of all time (Aretha Franklin holds the record). While millions are familiar with Warwick’s music, the icon is notoriously private. “Don’t Make Me Over” “brings to life the real Dionne Warwick, an African-American woman who broke racial and gender barriers, a dedicated humanitarian fighting injustice worldwide, and a singer whose music became the soundtrack for generations,” a statement promises.

The doc is co-directed and co-produced by David Heilbroner (“Stonewall Uprising”) and Dave Wooley and includes untold stories from Gladys Knight, Cissy Houston, Smokey Robinson, and more.

“While the world knows her many hits, Dionne has quietly guarded her astonishing, inspiring personal journey,” said Heilbroner. “We are both honored and thrilled to bring this great artist’s life and legacy to the screen.”

The Advocate has described Warwick as “one of the most famous allies Lgbt people have ever known.” Warwick participated in a number of of charity events benefiting the fight against AIDS during the 1980s, and in 1985 she enlisted Knight, Elton John, and others to record a cover of “That’s What Friends are For” to raise money for amFAR, an organization dedicated to AIDS research. “The song wound up in Billboard’s number 1 spot, where it sat for weeks, raising more than $3 million,” The Advocate writes.

Dionne Warwick Doc in the Works was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Upcoming Bam Exhibition Celebrates Black Women’s Cinema

Daughters of the Dust”: Bam

Cinephiles, your February just became a whole lot busier. Brooklyn Academy of Music (Bam) recently announced its “One Way or Another: Black Women’s Cinema, 1970–1991” exhibition, which commemorates the theatrical and Blu-ray re-release of Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust” with screenings of films from black women directors. According to the exhibit’s website, this event was designed to honor the “black women directors who blazed the trail for that landmark film.”

“One Way or Another” features a variety of film (long-form, short-form, documentary, narrative, and animation) and explores a wide cross-section of topics, especially those specific to black women’s culture, including body image, identity, the role church plays, the complexities of black hair, colorism, representation in the media, Zora Neale Hurston’s work, and black feminism.

Screenings of “Daughters of the Dust” will kick-off the event on February 3. Other films to screen include Dash’s shorts (“Standing at the Scratch Line,” “Four Women,” “Illusions,” and “Praise House”), Debra J. Robinson’s “I Be Done Was Is,” Liz White’s “Othello,” Cheryl Chisholm’s “On Becoming a Woman,” Elena Featherstone’s “Visions of the Spirit: A Portrait of Alice Walker,” and Euzhan Palcy’s “Sugar Cane Alley.”

Below is the full list of films that will screen at “One Way or Another,” courtesy of Bam. Visit the Bam website to buy tickets or find out more. The exhibit will run from February 3–23.

Daughters of the Dust” — Directed By Julie Dash

Feb 3 — Feb 5, 2017

Julie Dash’s shimmering, dreamlike evocation of early-20th century Gullah life (which was a key influence on Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade”) is a sumptuous celebration of folk traditions and black womanhood.

Losing Ground” — Directed By Kathleen Collins

Feb 3 — Feb 5, 2017

A married couple experience a reawakening on a summer idyll in upstate New York. This revelatory comedic drama is one of the first films to explore sexuality from the perspective of a black female director.

“I Be Done Was Is ”— Directed By Debra J. Robinson

Feb 4 — Feb 9, 2017

Director Debra Robinson profiles four black female comedians, offering insight into what it means to be a sharp-witted woman navigating the male-dominated world of stand-up.

Julie Dash Shorts

Feb 5 — Feb 6, 2017

This program surveys Julie Dash’s (“Daughters of the Dust”) remarkable career from the 1970s to the present, including her breakthrough work, “Illusions,” which explores black representation in 1940s Hollywood.

“Standing at the Scratch Line”

A look at the history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Four Women

A dance film set to the music of Nina Simone.

Illusions

Explores African-American representation in 1940s Hollywood via the story of a black studio executive passing as white.

Praise House

A performance piece made with Urban Bush Women founder Jawole Willa Jo Zollar.

Camille Billops Program

Feb 6 — Feb 15, 2017

The films of Camille Billops are heartrending, fearlessly personal meditations on a range of emotionally charged subjects. This program brings together a cross section of Billops’ documentary work.

“Suzanne, Suzanne”

A harrowing portrait of a woman processing her abusive father and her own drug addiction.

Finding Christa

An autobiographical record of the filmmaker’s reunion with the daughter she gave up for adoption.

Take Your Bags

Billops’ examination of slavery and cultural theft.

“Zora is My Name! ”— Directed By Neema Barnette

Feb 7, 2017

The great Ruby Dee scripted and stars in this tribute to visionary writer and folklorist Zora Neale Hurston.

Performers and Artists

Feb 7, 2017

This shorts program spotlights several extraordinary black women artists, including dancers Syvilla Fort and Thelma Hill; sculptor Valerie Maynard; and drag king and activist Stormé DeLarverie.

“Valerie” — Directed by Monica J Freeman

Monica J. Freeman’s 1975 portrait of sculptor Valerie Maynard.

“Water Ritual #1: An Urban Rite of Purification ”— Directed by Barbara McCullough

An experimental performance film by Barbara McCullough, inspired by Afro-diasporic ceremonies.

“Syvilla: They Dance to Her Drum” — Directed by Ayoka Chenzira

Ayoka Chenzira’s 1979 tribute to dancer-choreographer Syvilla Fort.

“Remembering Thelma” — Directed by Kathe Sandler

Kathe Sandler’s 1981 portrait of dancer Thelma Hill, a founding member of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

“Storme: The Lady of the Jewel Box” — Directed by Michelle Parkerson

Michelle Parkerson’s 1987 profile of Stormé DeLarverie, a drag king, gay rights activist, and heroine of the Stonewall uprising.

“Visions of the Spirit: A Portrait of Alice Walker ”— Directed By Elena Featherstone

Feb 8, 2017

This revealing portrait of Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Alice Walker offers essential insight into the experiences that shaped her perspective as an outspoken black feminist.

Twice as Nice + A Minor Altercation

Feb 8, 2017

Jackie Shearer’s 1977 docudrama, about two girls during the desegregation of Boston’s public schools, screens alongside Jessie Maple’s portrait of twin college basketball players.

“Twice as Nice” — Directed by Jessie Maple

Jessie Maple, who made history as the first black woman admitted to New York’s camera operators union, explores the bond between twin college basketball players, scripted by S. Pearl Sharp.

“A Minor Altercation ”— Directed by Jackie Shearer

Jackie Shearer’s docudrama catching the tensions between two girls — one black, one white — during the desegregation of Boston’s public schools.

A Different Image + Perfect Image?

Feb 9, 2017

Two shorts, by Alile Sharon Larkin and Maureen Blackwood, about black women grappling with questions of identity, beauty, and societal norms.

A Different Image” — Directed by Alile Sharon Larkin

An art student sets out to reclaim her body and self-worth from Western patriarchal norms.

“Perfect Image?” — Directed by Maureen Blackwood

Two actresses, one light skinned, one dark skinned, in a series of freewheeling, sometimes musical, sketches exploring black beauty standards

Othello” — Directed By Liz White

Feb 13, 2017

Created by an entirely black cast and crew, including Yaphet Kotto in the title role, Liz White’s rarely screened adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy offers incisive commentary on the play’s racial dimensions.

Grey Area + 2 By Fronza Woods

Feb 13, 2017

These psychologically rich films are fully realized portraits of black female consciousness, offering unusually complex depictions of the experiences and inner-thoughts of African-American women.

Grey Area” — Directed by Monona Wali

The film revolves around an African-American woman reporter for a local television station who must seemingly compromise her political principles to keep her job, just as a former Black Panther Party member gets out of prison, only to realize that the old comrades in the struggle have moved on with their lives. It is also a plea for community development in Watts and other black L.A. neighborhoods, a concern that connects many of the L.A. Rebellion projects.

“Killing Time” — Directed by Fronza Woods

An offbeat, wryly humorous look at the dilemma of a would-be suicide unable to find the right outfit to die in, examines the personal habits, socialization, and complexities of life that keep us going.

“Fannie’s Film ”— Directed by Fronza Woods

A 65-year-old cleaning woman for a professional dancers’ exercise studio performs her job while telling us in voiceover about her life, hopes, goals, and feelings. A challenge to mainstream media’s ongoing stereotypes of women of color who earn their living as domestic workers, this seemingly simple documentary achieves a quiet revolution: the expressive portrait of a fully realized individual.

Sky Captain

Feb 15, 2017

Two heartrending portraits of black childhood: a hip-hop-infused South Bronx fantasy about teen suicide and a young girl’s perspective on her struggling single mother.

Sky Captain ”— Directed by Neema Barnette

Neema Barnette’s hip-hop-infused South Bronx fantasy that tackles the issue of teen suicide with a surplus of cinematic imagination.

“Your Children Come Back to You” — Directed by Alile Sharon Larkin

Alile Sharon Larkin’s first film is a contemporary allegory about values and assimilation. The film literalizes the meaning of a “mother country” by means of the story of a young girl, Tovi, torn between two surrogate mothers: one comfortably bourgeois, the other nationalist.

Cycles + On Becoming a Woman

Feb 16, 2017

Two films exploring the relationships of black women to their bodies: a woman performs Caribbean folk rituals in Zeinabu Irene Davis’ “Cycles” and Cheryl Chisholm addresses reproductive rights in “Becoming A Woman.”

Cycles” — Directed by Zeinabu Irene Davis

Rasheeda Allen is waiting for her period, a state of anticipation familiar to all women. Drawing on Caribbean folklore, this exuberant experimental drama uses animation and live action to discover a film language unique to African American women. The multilayered soundtrack combines a chorus of women’s voices with the music of Africa and the diaspora — including Miriam Makeba, acappella singers from Haiti, and trumpetiste Clora Bryant.

“On Becoming a Woman ”— Directed by Cheryl Chisholm

This documentary provides rare insights into some important health issues for African American women. Filmed primarily during the National Black Women’s Health Project workshop sessions, this historic film also demonstrates models for trust and communication between mothers and daughters.

I Am Somebody + The Maids

Feb 16, 2017

This program mines the complicated relationship between black women, capitalism, and the workplace as documented by a 1969 hospital workers’ strike in Charleston and the history of domestic service.

I Am Somebody” — Directed by Madeline Anderson With Coretta Scott King

This civil rights documentary tells the story of black female hospital workers going on strike to demand union recognition and a wage increase.

“The Maids” — Directed by Muriel Jackson

Offering a sophisticated analysis of the racial and sexual division of labor in this country, this intriguing and articulate documentary looks at the history of domestic work since slavery and the ambivalence felt by African American women towards it.

“One Way or Another (De Cierta Manera)” — Directed By Sara Gómez

Feb 18, 2017

Pioneering Afro-Cuban filmmaker Sara Gómez’s radical narrative-documentary hybrid delivers a complex critique of regressive machismo in a post-revolutionary Cuba.

A Dream is What You Wake Up From

Feb 18, 2017

This program of films about black families, neighborhoods, and home life in the 1970s includes portraits of African-American communities in Harlem and Hamilton Heights.

“A Dream is What You Wake Up From”— Directed by Larry Bullard and Carolyn Johnson

The everyday lives of three Black families with different approaches to their struggle for survival in the United States are represented through a mix of fiction and documentary scenes, a docudrama style inspired by the work of Cuban filmmaker Sara Gómez. Filmmakers Larry Bullard and Carolyn Y. Johnson relied on a mix of documentary and drama to record families engaged in their day to day activities at home, at work and in school.

“A Sense of Pride: Hamilton Heights”— Directed by Monica J. Freeman

Monica J. Freeman’s serene portrait of Hamilton Heights at the peak of its brownstone revival is a testament to the cohesion and spirit of an African-American middle class fighting hard for its place in a depressed city, and, in the process, returning a grand old neighborhood to its rightful splendor.

“Black Faces ”— Directed by Young Filmmakers Foundation

A montage of faces from the Harlem community in early the 1970s.

Animation Program

Feb 19, 2017

The contributions of black women to the art of animation are celebrated in this program of shorts about African-American hair, identity, love, and more.

“Hair Piece: A Film for Nappy-Headed People”— Directed by Ayoka Chenzira

A musical satire on the politically charged subject of African-American hair.

“Zajota and the Boogie Spirit”— Directed by Ayoka Chenzira

A rhythmic celebration of African dance with a score by Mino Cinelu.

Picking Tribes” — Directed by S. Pearl Sharp

A young girl navigates her identity as a black Native American.

A Powerful Thang”— Directed by Zeinabu irene Davis

An inventive mix of live-action and animation exploring sex, love, and relationships.

“Namibia: Independence Now!”— Directed By Pearl Bowser and Christine Choy

Feb 20, 2017

This urgent, eye-opening documentary, shot inside refugee camps in Zambia and Angola, is an essential record of the role that women played in the struggle for South-West African liberation.

The Cruz Brothers and Miss Malloy — Directed By Kathleen Collins

Feb 21, 2017

This lost treasure from Kathleen Collins, whose 1982 film “Losing Ground” was one of the major rediscoveries of 2015, is a magical realist tale of three Puerto Rican brothers and their father’s ghost.

Sugar Cane Alley”— Directed By Euzhan Palcy

Feb 23, 2017

A teenage orphan sets out to make something of himself in acclaimed director Euzhan Palcy’s gorgeous vision of black life in French colonial Martinique.

Upcoming Bam Exhibition Celebrates Black Women’s Cinema was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

President Obama Names Historic Lgbt Bar Stonewall Inn a National Monument

  • PEOPLE.com
President Obama Names Historic Lgbt Bar Stonewall Inn a National Monument
Nearly one year after the historic Supreme Court decision allowed same-sex couples to legally get married in the United States, President Barack Obama is honoring a landmark in Lgbt history. The Stonewall Inn in New York City's West Village neighborhood is now a national monument, the White House announced. "Today, President Obama will designate a new national monument at the historic site of the Stonewall Uprising in New York City to honor the broad movement for Lgbt equality," the White House said in a statement on Friday. "The new Stonewall National Monument will protect the area where, on June 28, 1969, a
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Judy Garland's Daughter Lorna Luft Sings 'Over the Rainbow' for the First Time in Tribute to Orlando, Stonewall and Her Late Mother

  • PEOPLE.com
Judy Garland's Daughter Lorna Luft Sings 'Over the Rainbow' for the First Time in Tribute to Orlando, Stonewall and Her Late Mother
Lorna Luft, daughter of the late Judy Garland, gave an emotional performance of her mother's signature tune "Over the Rainbow" at New York City's Feinstein's/54 Below on Wednesday night - the first she's ever given of the song, she says. "I've never sung this song," Luft told concertgoers before the performance. "Not because it was too hard for me emotionally, but because I always felt you can't improve on perfect. But I thought to myself, if I'm ever going to sing this, now is the time." The emotional moment came 47 years to the day after Garland died at the age
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Judy Garland's Daughter Lorna Luft Sings 'Over the Rainbow' for the First Time in Tribute to Orlando, Stonewall and Her Late Mother

  • PEOPLE.com
Judy Garland's Daughter Lorna Luft Sings 'Over the Rainbow' for the First Time in Tribute to Orlando, Stonewall and Her Late Mother
Lorna Luft, daughter of the late Judy Garland, gave an emotional performance of her mother's signature tune "Over the Rainbow" at New York City's Feinstein's/54 Below on Wednesday night - the first she's ever given of the song, she says. "I've never sung this song," Luft told concertgoers before the performance. "Not because it was too hard for me emotionally, but because I always felt you can't improve on perfect. But I thought to myself, if I'm ever going to sing this, now is the time." The emotional moment came 47 years to the day after Garland died at the age
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Ninth Annual QFest St. Louis – Lgbtq Film Festival Begins Friday at The Hi-Pointe Backlot

Come get your Q on starting this Friday! The Ninth Annual QFest St. Louis, presented by Cinema St. Louis, runs April 24-28 at the Hi-Pointe Backlot Theatre. The St. Louis-based Lgbtq film festival, QFest will present an eclectic slate of 28 films – 13 features (seven narratives and six documentaries) and 15 short subjects. The participating filmmakers represent a wide variety of voices in contemporary queer world cinema. The mission of the film festival is to use the art of contemporary gay cinema to spotlight the lives of Lgbtq people and to celebrate queer culture.

The 2016 QFest St. Louis begins on Sunday, April 24, and runs through Thursday, April 28. Tickets are on sale now for all shows. Cost is $12 each or $10 for students and Cinema St. Louis members with valid and current IDs. All screenings will be held at the Hi-Pointe Backlot Theatre, located at 1002 Hi Pointe Place, directly behind the Hi-Pointe Theatre. Advance sales
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Ninth Annual Qfest St. Louis – Lgbtq Film Festival Runs April 24-28th at The Hi-Pointe Backlot

It’s almost time to get your Q on, St. Louis!! The Ninth Annual QFest St. Louis, presented byCinema St. Louis, runs April 24-28th at The Hi-Pointe Backlot (1002 Hi Pointe Place)

The St. Louis-based Lgbtq film festival, QFest will present an eclectic slate of films from filmmakers that represent a wide variety of voices in contemporary queer world cinema. The mission of the film festival is to use the art of contemporary gay cinema to illustrate the diversity of the Lgbtq community and to explore the complexities of living an alternative lifestyle.

All screenings at the Hi-Pointe Backlot, 1002 Hi Pointe Place, St. Louis, Mo 63117. Individual tickets are $12 for general admission, $10 for students and Cinema St. Louis members with valid and current photo IDs.

Advance tickets may be purchased at the Hi-Pointe Backlot box office or website. For more info, visit the Cinema St. Louis site Here

http://www.cinemastlouis.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Before 'Scandal,' Guillermo Diaz was a real drag in 'Stonewall'

Before 'Scandal,' Guillermo Diaz was a real drag in 'Stonewall'
Fans of Scandal know Guillermo Díaz as torture-addicted Gladiator Huck, who’s been known to lick his colleague-turned-enemy-turned-lover Quinn (Katie Lowes) and do unspeakable things to her in parking garages. Nearly 20 years ago, though, Díaz was an emerging actor who’d just starred opposite Parker Posey in Party Girl and was looking for a breakout gig. Enter Stonewall.

Díaz booked his first leading role as La Miranda, a larger-than-life drag queen (and I’m not just talking about her hair), in Nigel Finch’s fictionalized account of the days leading up to the birth of the modern Lgbt rights movement
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

HBO Documentary Films Seizes ‘Newburgh Sting’ Before Its Tribeca Premiere

HBO Documentary Films has picked up doc “The Newburgh Sting” ahead of the movie’s world premiere at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival.

Film by Kate Davis and David Heilbroner — the duo behind docs “Southern Comfort,” “The Stonewall Uprising” and “The Cheshire Murders” — investigates the case of the “Newburgh Four,” a quartet of street criminals from impoverished backgrounds who were drawn into a bombing plot by a Pakistani FBI informant. The 2009 arrest has since been alternately lauded as a triumph in the war on terror or criticized as entrapment.

Deal was pacted with HBO by Dan Cogan on behalf of film funder Impact Partners and the filmmakers. HBO will air the doc in July following its April 20 screening at Tribeca.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Briefs: “Glee” Loses Four Original Cast Members, Gandalf Calls It A Day, and Bert & Ernie Fallout

Here is last week’s caption pic winner. This week’s caption pic is at the bottom of the page.

Thanks to everyone for participating! The winner is …

“Alvin, there are some things you just can’t tuck”

Thanks to Rob for this week’s winning caption!

Weekend Birthdays! Ed Westwick (above) is 26, Kathy Bates is 65, John Cusack is 47, Lizzy Caplan is 31, and Brian Bloom is 43 (more with him on page two).

And 3 … 2 … 1 … Prestigious New Yorker magazine irresponsibly promotes child endangerment.

Tyler Coates isn’t too happy with the cover, either.

Will Supreme Court Rulings GiveThe Front Runner Film Momentum?

TV Line is reporting that Heather Morris, Mark Salling, Harry Shum Jr. and Amber Riley will not be returning to Glee as regular cast members, but may make occasional appearances. Well, considering that Mark, Harry, and Amber were basically guest stars last season, the only real difference this year will be Heather.
See full article at The Backlot »

Your Winter Indie Film Preview: Anywhere But a Movie Theater

  • IFC
If it's too cold to leave the house for your local theater, there's plenty of options if you stay inside online, on demand and on DVD. What follows is your guide to all the new releases coming your way between now and April.

Online and On Demand

My French Film Festival

Thanks to bids for Oscar consideration, the winter is traditionally one of the rare times foreign films get plenty of attention in the States, particularly at West Coast festivals such as Palm Springs and Santa Barbara. However, Francophiles in particular will be excited to know you won't have to go to California or New York -- or even Paris for that matter -- to be able to catch some of the most recent cinema from France since uniFrance is unveiling My French Film Festival, which is being billed as the "first exclusively online film festival celebrating French talent" that
See full article at IFC »

Stonewall Uprising Poster Takes You Back To June 28, 1969

  • ShockYa
Stonewall Uprising Poster Takes You Back To June 28, 1969
Submitting to or running from oppressive cops was the norm for the gay community in New York City back in the 50’s and 60’s, but, like Stonewall Uprising’s new poster’s tagline says, “on June 28th, 1969, everything changed.” When a small group of officers raided the Stonewall Inn, not only did the patrons fight back, but a massive crowd formed in front of the establishment. The arrival of more cops only added fuel to the fire and the riot continued through the night, the following two nights and eventually gave rise to what is now known as the Gay Pride Parade. Is this news to you? Then checking out Kate Davis [...]
See full article at ShockYa »

Liberation's Forge: Kate Davis & David Heilbroner on Stonewall Uprising

Liberation's Forge: Kate Davis & David Heilbroner on Stonewall Uprising
And so now we catch up on a couple of very good films that opened last week, but because there's only so much podcasting I can do before my ears start to bleed, I had to wait a week to be covered. In the case of the film featured in this episode, Stonewall Uprising, the delay turns out not to be too bad: we're still in the midst of Pride Week, after all, so this documentary remains relevant. This is from Kate Davis and David Heilbroner, whom we met earlier this year with the release of their black metal documentary Waiting for Armageddon. There are fewer church burnings in Stonewall, but that doesn't mean the event depicted -- a 1969 NYC riot sparked when the police raided a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn and the patrons decided they'd had...
See full article at Huffington Post »

"Stonewall Uprising" Chronicles the Reason We Have Pride

This Sunday, when millions of people, gay and straight, congregate on the streets and sidewalks of New York City for the NYC Pride March to watch gyrating Altoids guys and floats sponsored by multinational corporations glide by, few are likely to think about — or know about — the origins of the march. The annual march has transformed into a joyous and glitzy affair embraced by corporations, politicians and the public, but it originated from a three day rebellion against the NYPD in front of the Stonewall Inn in NYC’s Greenwich Village 41 years ago by a motley group of down-on-their-luck queer street kids with nothing, and therefore nothing to lose.

The new documentary Stonewall Uprising by Kate Davis and David Heilbroner focuses in on the Stonewall Rebellion of June 28, 1969, its aftermath, and the cultural context in which it occurred. The documentary includes first hand accounts of those who witnessed the riots,
See full article at The Backlot »

Stonewall Uprising at Film Forum

Stonewall Uprising at Film Forum
While we grapple with such problems as whether or not the recently out but obviously gay Sean Hayes is believable as a heterosexual in love with Kristen Chenowith in the delightful Broadway revival of Promises Promises, it is good to remember this privileged debate is hard won. Going back to a time when same sex coupling was a crime, marriage unthinkable, a new documentary, Stonewall Uprising, directed by Kate Davis and David Heilbroner, closely following David Carter's book, Stonewall: The Riots that Sparked the Gay Revolution, has now opened at Film Forum and tells the amazing story of this evolution in human rights. Tracing the untoward history of gay liberation in America, from what it was like in the 'sixties, a fairly recent past, when homosexuality was demonized, and thought to be a disease that might be cured with electric...
See full article at Huffington Post »

Where riots led to rights

June 28 will mark the 41st anniversary of what has become known as the Stonewall Uprising. On that night, the NYPD raided the Stonewall Inn, a raunchy, mob-run gay bar on Christopher Street in the West Village that served stolen, watered-down booze. Much to the surprise of cops, the patrons refused to go quietly, leading to three days of street disturbances. Those events serve as the jumping-off point for "Stonewall Uprising," a documentary directed by Kate Davis and David Heilbroner. The film
See full article at New York Post »

Film Forum Sets Summer Schedule

Film Forum Sets Summer Schedule
Celebrating its 40th anniversary, New York's Film Forum has announced its summer 2010 slate, which includes Dover Kosashvili's "Anton Chekov's The Duel," Jessica Oreck's "Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo," Emmanuel Laurent's "Two In The Wave," Johan Grimonprez's "Double Take," Kate Davis & David Heilbroner's "Stonewall Uprising," Pedro Gonzalez-Rubio's "Alamar," Vikram Jayanti's "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector," Tamra Davis's "Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child," Marco Amenta's "The Sicilian Girl," and ...
See full article at Indiewire »

See also

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