7.8/10
118
2 user 5 critic

Cheng zhe guang ying lu xing (2009)

Reviews

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Pickle is a night security guard at a bronze statue factory. His colleague, Belly Bottom, works as a recycling collector during the day, and Pickle's biggest pleasure in life is flicking ... See full summary »

Director: Hsin-yao Huang
Stars: Cres Chuang, Bamboo Chu-Sheng Chen, Leon Dai
1987 (2017)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

In 1987 Korea under an oppressive military regime, the unlawful interrogation and death of a college student ignite ordinary citizens to fight for the truth and bring about justice.

Director: Joon-Hwan Jang
Stars: Yoon-Seok Kim, Jung-woo Ha, Hae-jin Yoo
Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Madame Tang colludes and mediates between the government and the private businesses for the benefits of her all-female family. One case does not go according to plan, and an entire family ... See full summary »

Director: Ya-che Yang
Stars: Kara Wai, Ke-Xi Wu, Vicky Chen
Crime | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

Based on a true story, primarily on a conflict between two youth gangs, a 14-year-old boy's girlfriend conflicts with the head of one gang for an unclear reason, until finally the conflict comes to a violent climax.

Director: Edward Yang
Stars: Chen Chang, Lisa Yang, Kuo-Chu Chang
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A mentally ill stockbroker struggles to reconcile with his estranged father and his perturbed ex-fiancée.

Director: Chun Wong
Stars: Shawn Yue, Eric Tsang, Elaine Jin
Action | Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

In 1905, revolutionist Sun Yat-Sen visits Hong Kong to discuss plans with Tongmenghui members to overthrow the Qing dynasty. But when they find out that assassins have been sent to kill him, they assemble a group of protectors to prevent any attacks.

Director: Teddy Chan
Stars: Xueqi Wang, Tony Ka Fai Leung, Jun Hu
Old Beast (2017)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Lao Yang is an Erdosian businessman well in his 60s. He was broke years ago due to local economy decline. One day, he misappropriates a sum of money his children gathered for his wife's ... See full summary »

Director: Ziyang Zhou
Stars: Tumen, Chaobei Wang, Danna Yi
Duo sang (1994)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Autobiographical story about the life of a poor family in the Taiwanese countryside during the 1940s and 1950s as the Japanese rule of the island ends and nationalist forces of Kwomintang arrive when the Communists take the mainland.

Director: Nien-Jen Wu
Stars: Akio Chen, Jun Fu, Yung-Feng Lee
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

The ethereally beautiful Vicky recalls her romances with Hao Hao and Jack in the neon-lit clubs of Taipei.

Director: Hsiao-Hsien Hou
Stars: Qi Shu, Jack Kao, Chun-hao Tuan
Yi Yi (2000)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

Each member of a middle class Taipei family seeks to reconcile past and present relationships within their daily lives.

Director: Edward Yang
Stars: Nien-Jen Wu, Elaine Jin, Issei Ogata
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  
Director: Hirokazu Koreeda
Stars: Cocco
Documentary | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

An elementary school in Japan begins an experimental program that frames the students' curriculum around one single project: the raising of a calf from adolescence to adulthood. Through ... See full summary »

Director: Hirokazu Koreeda
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Ping Bin Lee ... Himself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
... Himself
... Herself
... Himself
... Himself
... Himself
... Himself
... Herself
Duu-Chih Tu ... Himself
... Himself (as Kar Wai Wong)
... Herself
Isao Yukisada ... Himself
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

| | |

Release Date:

30 April 2010 (Hong Kong)  »

Also Known As:

Let the Wind Carry Me  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A great cinematographer from Taiwan
17 April 2011 | by See all my reviews

Kwan Pun-leung and Chiang Hsiu-chiung have made a documentary that celebrates one of the most significant cinematographers today, Mark Lee Ping Bing, who has worked extensively with Hou Hsiao-hsien, Wong Kar- wai, and other great Asian directors like Tran Anh Hung and Hirakazu Koreeda, as well as some European ones. Mark Lee's passion for light and color emerges as rapidly as does his striking appearance. He's a gnarly, beaded, handsome, macho guy but wait... there's something not right, because he's such a workaholic he completely neglects his wife and kids, and only occasionally has done justice to his beautiful, smiling, youthful mother, now 80, who raised him after his father died young. Mark Lee is admired and beloved, but he is a solitary wanderer, perpetually on the road, who when he received notice that he had won his native Taiwan's highest cultural honor, was terrified that the 20 phone messages meant something dire had happened to his family, and kept the great news of his honor when he opened the messages to himself. What kind of man is this? Well, an artist, certainly, maybe a great one, who is as subtle and dedicated as he is open and willing to share his secrets with newcomers to the craft he represents so impressively -- but whose dedication takes its toll on his personal life. We never see Lee's California-based wife at all, and we see his son Jason telling how when as a boy he saw his dad getting an award on TV, he went and turned the set off, because he was angry to be reminded his father was always away. "Now that I'm older I understand better," he says. But this kind of father takes a lifetime to come to terms with. At another time fires endangered his family in California, but Lee knew little about it.

Lee is in almost every frame of this film, describing his formation and his passions, and we see images from Hou's A Time to Live and a Time to Die, Goodbye South, Goodbye and Three Times as well as Flowers of Shanghai. Hou's and Lee's battle over the lighting of the latter was a turning point, Lee says. Lee fought to have an enhanced version of candlelight, while Hou wanted scenes simply to be shrouded in darkness. Lee's concern is always to celebrate light in a natural way, but light, not darkness. His sense of nature has a Taoist quality. He goes with the flow (one subtitle actually has him say that) and if it rains when they meant to shoot in sunlight, they must change the scene to rain. If it snows in the desert, they must capture that -- the story behind a striking sequence in Jiang Wen's "The Sun Also Rises,. The movement of leaves in the wind can have a special grace (in Tran Anh Hung's atmospheric and beautiful The Vertical Ray of the Sun). Nature always comes through, Lee says.

Somehow things became easier in the ongoing combative relationship between Hou and Lee after Flowers of Shanghai, and they went on to make Millennium Mambo and Flight of the Red Balloon together. There are sequences showing the shooting of Red Balloon in Paris, and a lot of the interview footage was shot there (allowing several French contributors to come in, including Romain Duris, Grégoire Colin, and a French director, scenes of Lee partying with film crews and reminiscing about his early days, and Lee's endless rambling, which entertains, but blurs a sense of the chronology of his career.

Director Silvia Chang describes Lee's apprenticeship years in Taiwan as teaching him to be fast and accurate. Wong Kar-wai speaks only briefly, though with great admiration. The word "stability" occurs more than once. It's quality the Chinese crews look for and that Lee supplies. He's solid, reliable, quietly passionate. Wong suggests that if Christopher Doyle, his most famous cinematographer collaborator, is a sailor, Lee is a soldier. There's some focus on In the Mood for Love, particularly the final sequence. Wong says when Lee is given wide open spaces to shoot, he is in his element.

This is a documentary drenched in cinematic charisma, but not a technical treatise. The nature of Lee's style as a cinematographer is only suggested by comments and clips. His talk of color and light is fascinating, and we can appreciate what he means when he says he learned emotion from Hou. Unfortunately though there are clips of some of the most known of the 50-odd films Lee has worked on, Variety reviewer Russell Edwards notes that many are not sampled at all, and "the poor quality of some of the clips betrays poor Asian archiving standards and suggests limited access to original prints..." The film arouses mixed emotions. It evokes awe at the Asian cinematic greatness of the Eighties and Nineties to which Lee significantly contributed, but there is doubt about where things are going now, and this seems only a fragment of a larger survey. Edwards concludes: "Lee may have been responsible for some of Asia's best-looking cinema of the past 20 years, but the presentation proves Quentin Tarantino's adage that "the projectionist gets final cut."


2 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 2 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial