6.5/10
45
2 user 4 critic

Full Signal (2010)

Not Rated | | Documentary, History | 19 February 2010 (USA)
Trailer
1:33 | Trailer
'Full Signal' captures a battle to take on the mobile phone companies. This crafted documentary cracks open the debate surrounding the global health risk they pose.

Director:

Talal Jabari
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3 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Samira Azzam Samira Azzam ... Self
Johann Bosman Johann Bosman ... Self
David Carpenter David Carpenter ... Self
Leonore Gordon Leonore Gordon ... Self
Rigmor Granlund-Lind Rigmor Granlund-Lind ... Self
Evie Hantzopolous Evie Hantzopolous ... Self
Olle Johansson ... Self
Blake Levitt Blake Levitt ... Self
Sleiman Abu Rukun Sleiman Abu Rukun ... Self
Leif Salford Leif Salford ... Self
Michael Scott Michael Scott ... Self
Sue Scott Sue Scott ... Self
Chris Seelbach Chris Seelbach ... Self
Whitney Seymour Jr. Whitney Seymour Jr. ... Self
Gabriel Seymour Gabriel Seymour ... Self
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Storyline

With over 3.5 billion cell phone users around the world, thousands of cell phone towers popping up in people's neighborhoods, children's schools and neighbor's rooftops, people are starting to feel the effects. Full Signal talks to scientists, lawmakers, lawyers and everyday people to investigate the truths and myths behind the impact of cellular technology. Written by Anonymous

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Plot Keywords:

independent film | See All (1) »


Certificate:

Not Rated
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Prof. Olle Johansson (Head, Experimental Dermatology Unit, Dept. of Neuroscience - Karolinska Institute): We did a double-blind exposure-test with people with electro-hypersensitivity in 1994 already. That was the very first study using mobile phones. And one of these people in the study was able to 100% of the time pick out the presence or not of such a mobile phone.
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User Reviews

 
Very important documentary about the health dangers of cell phones
25 September 2017 | by robert-temple-1See all my reviews

Although this film is now seven years old, and since then things have become much worse, this documentary is 'must' viewing for anyone not wanting to die of a brain tumour. The hazards of electro-pollution to human health are almost never mentioned, due to commercial pressures and the bought silence of those who should be warning us. But what the tobacco industry did to us is nothing compared to what the telecoms industry is doing. Studies show that anyone who has used a cell phone regularly prior to the age of 20 has a five times higher chance of developing a brain tumour than any other age group. The greatest danger is to children. The idiot parents who hand their little darlings cute cell phones with which to chat mindlessly to their friends are in fact handing them death certificates with the dates left blank. There is often a 20 year delay before you die. So that's all right then. The situation is even worse now with the spread of wi fi, which studies now suggest is contributing to the 60% drop in male fertility (this is more recent than this film and is not covered in it). When will the stupid population wake up and realize that being drenched in electromagnetic radiation is killing people? Or is it more important to chat than to live?


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

Palestine | USA

Release Date:

19 February 2010 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Sweden See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Capture Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
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