Kaboom (2010) - News Poster

(2010)

News

Steven Soderbergh and Gregg Araki team for Now Apocalypse

Variety is reporting that filmmakers Gregg Araki (Mysterious Skin) and Steven Soderbergh (Mosaic) are set to executive produce the new half-hour comedy series Now Apocalypse, which has received a ten-episode straight-to-series order from premium cable network Starz.

Created by Araki and co-written by Vogue sex columnist Karley Sciortino, the show is said to be a surreal, coming of age comedy which “follows Ulysses and his friends Carly, Ford and Severine, who are on various quests pursing love, sex and fame in Los Angeles. Between sexual and romantic dating app adventures, Ulysses grows increasingly troubled as foreboding premonitory dreams make him wonder if some kind of dark and monstrous conspiracy going on, or is he just smoking too much weed?”

“If this isn’t the craziest thing I’ve ever read, it’s tied for first,” said Soderbergh, who also executive produces The Girlfriend Experience for Starz. “We will not be
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Steven Soderbergh is Producing a Crazy Comedy Series For Starz Called Now Apocalypse

Steven Soderbergh is currently developing a comedy for Starz called Now Apocalypse. The cable network has already picked up the series for 10 half-hour episodes. The show was created by Gregg Araki (Kaboom), and it's described as a coming-of-age comedy that is said to have a "flipside of mythic, dreamlike creepiness."

The story follows "Ulysses and his friends Carly, Ford and Severine, who are on various quests pursuing love, sex and fame. Now Apocalypse explores identity, sexuality and artistry while navigating the strange and oftentimes bewildering city of Los Angeles. Between sexual and romantic dating app adventures, Ulysses grows increasingly troubled as foreboding premonitory dreams make him wonder — is some kind of dark and monstrous conspiracy going on, or is he just smoking too much weed?"

Araki will co-write the series with Karley Sciortino (Slutever), and he will direct all ten episodes with Soderbergh executive producing. Soderbergh had this to say
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Gregg Araki, Steven Soderbergh to collaborate on 'Now Apocalypse' for Starz

Lionsgate to handle international and North American distribution and home entertainment.

Gregg Araki and Steven Soderbergh, whose thriller Unsane opened at number 11 at the North American box office over the weekend, will collaborate on the half-hour comedy series Now Apocalypse for Starz.

Series creator Araki will co-write and direct all 10 episodes of the coming-of-age comedy about four friends pursuing love, sex and fame in Los Angeles.

Author and Vogue.com sex columnist Karley Sciortino (creator of Viceland’s Slutever) will co-write and serve as a consulting producer. Soderbergh is on board as executive producer with Araki and Gregory Jacobs.

Starz
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Gregg Araki And Steven Soderbergh Team Up For Starz Series ‘Now Apocalypse’

Starz just announced a new series, and judging by the talent involved, the show is shaping up to be unlike anything else on TV.

Executive produced by Steven Soderbergh, who had previously worked with Starz on “The Girlfriend Experience” and “Now Apocalypse,” was just given a 10-episode straight-to-series order from the network. Filmmaker Gregg Araki, best known for films “Kaboom” and “Mysterious Skin,” is also on board the series, where he will co-write and direct every episode.
See full article at The Playlist »

Starz Orders Steven Soderbergh Comedy 'Now Apocalypse'

Steven Soderbergh is expanding his relationship with Starz.

The premium cable network has handed out a 10-episode, straight-to-series order for the half-hour comedy Now Apocalypse, which hails from the Girlfriend Experience executive producer.

Created and exec produced by Gregg Araki (Kaboom), the coming-of-age comedy follows Ulysses and his friends Carly, Ford and Severine, who are on various quests pursing love, sex and fame. Now Apocalypse explores identity, sexuality and artistry while navigating the strange and oftentimes bewildering city of Los Angeles. Between sexual and romantic dating app adventures, Ulysses grows increasingly troubled as foreboding premonitory dreams make him wonder — is some...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Starz Greenlights ‘Now Apocalypse’ Comedy Series From ‘Kaboom’s Gregg Araki & Steven Soderbergh

Starz Greenlights ‘Now Apocalypse’ Comedy Series From ‘Kaboom’s Gregg Araki & Steven Soderbergh
Starz has given the green light to half-hour comedy series Now Apocalypse from Gregg Araki (Kaboom, Mysterious Skin) and Steven Soderbergh (The Knick). Co-written by Araki, who also directs, and Vogue.com sex columnist Karley Sciortino, Now Apocalypse is described as a sexy, vibrant and fast-moving series that has a flipside of mythic, dreamlike creepiness. The 10-episode half-hour surreal, coming-of-age comedy series follows Ulysses and his friends Carly, Ford and…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Starz Greenlights Comedy Series ‘Now Apocalypse’ From Gregg Araki, Steven Soderbergh

Starz has ordered a new comedy series titled “Now Apocalypse,” the premium cabler announced Monday.

The half-hour comedy will be created and executive produced by Gregg Araki, with Steven Soderbergh also set to executive produce. The series is described as a surreal, coming-of-age comedy that follows Ulysses and his friends Carly, Ford and Severine, who are on various quests pursing love, sex and fame in Los Angeles. Between sexual and romantic dating app adventures, Ulysses grows increasingly troubled as foreboding premonitory dreams make him wonder if some kind of dark and monstrous conspiracy going on, or is he just smoking too much weed?
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Deadpool Creator Rob Liefeld Teams Up With Netflix To Adapt His Extreme Universe

Rob Liefeld, who has created some badass comic book characters over the years including Deadpool and X-Force, has teamed up with Netflix. Together they will adapt his Extreme Universe comic book characters into a series of feature films. All of these feature films will have a connective tissue, so it seems like this will be a cinematic universe of sorts.

Netflix has also hired screenwriter Akiva Goldsman to set up and oversee a "high-end writers room" much like he did with the Transformers film series, but hopefully, this ends up being better than Transformers.

For those of you not familiar with Liefeld's Extreme Universe, there are six different comic books that include over 50 characters. Some of those characters include Brigade, Bloodstrike, Cybrid, Re-Gex, Bloodwulf and Kaboom.

Netflix hopes that the edgy and subversive style of these characters will find success much like the kind Deadpool has seen. Netflix feature film chief Scott Stuber,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Haley Bennett

Haley Bennett is an actress and singer who was born in Florida on January 7, 1988. She began her professional acting career in 2007 when she made her film debut in ‘Music and Lyrics’ playing the role of Cora Corman. She starred alongside Hugh Grant and Drew Barrymore in this movie. Other films for which she is well-known include ‘The Girl on the Train’, ‘College’, ‘Kaboom’, ‘The Hole’, ‘The Equalizer’, ‘The Haunting of Molly Hartley’, ‘Hardcore Henry’, and ‘The Magnificent Seven’. Despite having roles in so many hit movies, there are many things you probably do not know about this

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Haley Bennett
See full article at TVovermind.com »

’13 Reasons Why’ Stars On How Tom McCarthy and Gregg Araki Set the Tone for Netflix’s Gripping Teen Suicide Drama

’13 Reasons Why’ Stars On How Tom McCarthy and Gregg Araki Set the Tone for Netflix’s Gripping Teen Suicide Drama
It sounds like an unenviable task: Make a show about suicide that handles the subject matter sensitively, while also being entertaining. Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why” strikes that delicate balance, and according to its young stars Dylan Minnette (“Prisoners”) and Katherine Langford, all credit goes to the powerhouse creative team behind this gripping drama.

Based on Jay Asher’s young adult novel and created by Tony-winning playwright Brian Yorkey (“Next to Normal”), with “Spotlight” director Tom McCarthy as executive producer, “13 Reasons Why” tells the story of 16-year-old Hannah Baker (Langford), a vibrant young girl who shocks everyone who knew her when she takes her own life. In lieu of a suicide note, Hannah leaves behind 13 cassette tapes, with each side detailing a reason and person who led her to suicide. As the tapes get passed around to the people named, a shy boy named Clay Jensen (Minnette), who had a crush on Hannah,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Ordinary World of Netflix’s ‘13 Reasons Why’

We chat with the show’s production designer about everything from ‘The Leftovers’ to Andy Warhol.

Brian Yorkey’s 13 Reasons Why begins in a high school hallway but doesn’t stay there. Its branches can be felt in every inch of the Northern California suburban town. Adapting Jay Asher’s bestselling Thirteen Reasons Why into a 13-episode series that Netflix dropped last weekend, the series explores the world surrounding Hannah, a teenager (Katherine Langford) who kills herself, and Clay (Dylan Minnette), a friend whose relationship to the deceased is among the show’s central ambiguities.

To some, framing what feels like a Twin Peaks-esque murder-mystery around an issue like suicide comes off as dangerous. Hank Stuever, of the Washington Post, called it “an especially cruel experience.” But suicide, the third leading cause of death for young people aged 15 to 24, has long been a fixture in teen literature, from Sharon Draper’s award-winner Tears of a Tiger
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

‘The Girl On The Train’ Review: Paula Hawkins’ Blockbuster Novel Derails On Its Way To The Screen

‘The Girl On The Train’ Review: Paula Hawkins’ Blockbuster Novel Derails On Its Way To The Screen
Imagine if “Gone Girl” had been developed as a toothless network television pilot — if it had been stripped of its subversive approach to gender dynamics, bludgeoned free of its sadistic gallows humor and shot like a very special episode of “NCIS: Suburbia.” Imagine if it hadn’t been directed by a filmmaker who’s drawn to trash the way that most people are to perfume, someone who genuinely believes you can learn as much about marriage and misogyny from the novels sold at an airport bookstore as you can from those taught in a college classroom. Imagine instead that it had been directed by the guy who made “The Help.”

Adapted from Paula Hawkins’ explosively popular novel of the same name, “The Girl on the Train” is nothing if not a story that’s stuck on rails. Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt) spends most of her time speaking in voiceover, if
See full article at Indiewire »

Joshua Reviews Stephen Cone’s Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party [Theatrical Review]

Making your way into theaters in the very start of a new year doesn’t help boost anticipation. Over the last handful of years, the months of January and February have become the dumping ground for pictures from major studios, that those executives either have little to no faith in or simply don’t know what else to do with. Focusing much of their attention on the awards fodder that begins to expand over the first few weeks of a new year (like The Revenant, opening in wide release this very weekend), studios relegate comedies or even horror to these weeks at the front end of the year, only to see them die a relatively quick death. And then there are the art house distributors, who have turned this part of the year into something far more important.

As more small, boutique distributors begin using this slow period to release
See full article at CriterionCast »

A Movie Guide to Your Never-Ending Twenties

An avid student of the depiction of youth in movies, I’ve taken to calling the twenties, as we live them nowadays, the benties, after the British word “bent,” for messed up. And, while I realize not everyone will have found this decade of late adolescence / imposed maturity as disconcerting as all that, I know for a fact that most Millennials will be hard-pressed to argue this point. It’s why we’re called the Me-Me-Me Generation after all: for us, the top-down pressure to grow up, move out and settle down rarely takes before the big 3-0 starts looming large. Perhaps, with a little less “luck” on our side, we too might look to the extraordinary lives of, say, Kelly Reichardt’s young female characters, and strive to fight adversity to heroic results. But, for the purposes of this list, we’ll concern ourselves with the simpler, not necessarily brighter,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

White Bird in a Blizzard | Review

Skin Deep: Araki Weathers a 4th Decade in Filmmaking

Gregg Araki’s latest ode to youthful alienation, White Bird in a Blizzard, is his most restrained and grounded work to date. It’s a quiet and astute film that derives its mystery from the err of human assumption and like most, or arguably all, of Araki’s work, this posits a naïve protagonist trying to come to terms with an unthinkably harsh world.

Unraveling slowly as 17-year-old Kat Connor (Shailene Woodley) dissects and rationalizes the world and the people around her following the disappearance of her mother, Eve (Eva Green). Kat is at a precipice, literally escaping the baby fat that marginalized and repressed her in early adolescence to emerge into an adult world unprepared, grappling with a sexuality she’s not entirely comfortable with or certain of. She’s also indirectly trying to relate this to her relationship
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Edward Snowden Documentary ‘Citizenfour’, Sweden’s ‘Force Majeure': Specialty Box Office Preview

Edward Snowden Documentary ‘Citizenfour’, Sweden’s ‘Force Majeure': Specialty Box Office Preview
Last year, RADiUS scored at the box office and in Awards Season with its documentary 20 Feet From Stardom (nearly $4.95 million and Best Documentary Feature Oscar win). This year, it may have another non-fiction awards behemoth, hitting theaters this weekend.

Citizenfour, directed by journalist and filmmaker Laura Poitras, tells the story of Nsa leaker Edward Snowden as he disclosed massive domestic U.S. government spying. The film unfolds in real time as Poitras and Guardian colleague Glenn Greenwald, working on a long-term project about government surveillance, were contacted online by a mysterious source calling himself “Citizenfour.” The film, completed in secret while Poitras was in self-imposed virtual exile, alleges even more Nsa overreaching at home and abroad than just what came out of the massive pile of U.S. documents Snowden leaked.

Another potential awards contender also arrives in U.S. theaters this weekend: Sweden’s entry for Foreign Language Oscar,
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

8 Things You Should Know About Shailene Woodley's 'White Bird in a Blizzard'

8 Things You Should Know About Shailene Woodley's 'White Bird in a Blizzard'
At the end of "White Bird in a Blizzard," I felt sad and dirty and lost. Call it the Gregg Araki effect. The writer/director's beautifully told films make you feel warm and fuzzy, with bubblegum candy colors and likable young characters, before revealing a latent darkness that leaves you unsafe and unsettled. And these warring sensibilities have never felt more at odds (or at home) with each other than in the campy, creeping dread of "White Bird." Foremost the director of "The Living End," "The Doom Generation" and "Mysterious Skin" (this is his first film since 2010 pratfall "Kaboom"), Araki sheds his new queer cinema roots for this Shailene Woodley vehicle about a 17-year-old girl named Kat whose sexual awakening is sparked by the spooky disappearance of her down-in-the-doldrums alcoholic mother, played with wicked malaise and malice by an out-of-place (but never out-of-step) Eva Green. Then there's Kat's stiff,...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Shailene Woodley and Eva Green are Depressed in White Bird in a Blizzard

Shailene Woodley and Eva Green are Depressed in White Bird in a Blizzard
After a pair of characteristically way-out works (Smiley Face, Kaboom), New Queer Cinema provocateur Gregg Araki returns to the somber tenor of Mysterious Skin with White Bird in a Blizzard. Like Skin, which starred Joseph Gordon-Levitt, White Bird finds Araki adapting a novel with the help of a talented young performer. Set in a California suburb as the 1980s became the '90s, White Bird follows 17-year-old Kat Connor (Shailene Woodley, in Depeche Mode T-shirts and Converse kicks) as she deals with the sudden disappearance of her belligerent mother (Eva Green). Recruiting the vamp-like Green to play Woodley's long-depressed mom (the actresses are only 12 years apart in age) isn't Araki's only idiosyncratic casting: Gabourey Sidi...
See full article at Village Voice »

Trailer Watch: Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard

Here we have the first official trailer from Magnolia Pictures for Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard, his first film since 2010′s old-school-wacky Kaboom. By all accounts White Bird is a return to the more somberly melodramatic terrain of teen sexuality and lingering trauma of his 2004 apex Mysterious Skin. The film film hits on demand/iTunes on September 25th, with theatrical release following on October 24th. You can also take this opportunity to catch up with Brandon Harris’ 2011 interview with Araki.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Trailer Watch: Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard

Here we have the first official trailer from Magnolia Pictures for Gregg Araki’s White Bird in a Blizzard, his first film since 2010′s old-school-wacky Kaboom. By all accounts White Bird is a return to the more somberly melodramatic terrain of teen sexuality and lingering trauma of his 2004 apex Mysterious Skin. The film film hits on demand/iTunes on September 25th, with theatrical release following on October 24th. You can also take this opportunity to catch up with Brandon Harris’ 2011 interview with Araki.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites