7.3/10
2,349
31 user 60 critic

Alamar (2009)

Trailer
2:21 | Trailer
Before their inevitable farewell, Jorge, a young man of Mayan roots, and Natan, his half-Italian son, spend time together living off the Banco Chinchorro coral reef.

Writer:

Pedro González-Rubio (screenplay)
11 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Jorge Machado Jorge Machado ... Jorge
Roberta Palombini Roberta Palombini ... Roberta
Natan Machado Palombini Natan Machado Palombini ... Natan
Nestór Marín Nestór Marín ... Matraca
Garza Silvestre Garza Silvestre ... Blanquita
Edit

Storyline

Before their inevitable farewell, Jorge, a young man of Mayan roots, and Natan, his half-Italian son, spend time together living off the Banco Chinchorro coral reef.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

sea | mexico | holiday | crocodile | egret | See All (12) »

Genres:

Documentary | Drama

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Tired of the repeated question about whether his movie is fictional or documentary, director 'Pedro Gonzalez-Rubio' finally explained to one festival audience: "It's a film". See more »

Quotes

Jorge: Me neither, I drink my coffee every night before going to bed
Matraca: Me too, when I'm with my buddies we always have coffee. But we drink it during daytime
Jorge: With the old guys
Matraca: With my buddies, the young guys
Jorge: What do you mean by young guys. Are they your age. If they are your age than that's not young anymore. You have lived many spring times, you're not that young any more
Matraca: Well, I'm still young at heart. I don't feel old...
Jorge: One thing is to feel and another is to be old
Matraca: ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

The cast list includes a credit for Garza Silvestre playing the role of Blanquita, the egret that appears in the film. "Garza Silvestre" means "wild heron" in Spanish. See more »

User Reviews

 
A lyrical film of rare natural beauty
1 May 2011 | by howard.schumannSee all my reviews

The unconditional love of a father for his young son is paramount in Pedro Gonzales-Rubio's cinematic tone poem, Alamar, a lyrical film of rare natural beauty. Set in the Banco Chinchorro, the largest atoll in Mexico and the habitat of hundreds of different species, director Rubio's 73-minute part fiction and part documentary film is imbued with a love of the sea and respect for the environment. According to the director, "By photographing and developing a story based on the current relation between man and his habitat in Chinchorro (declared in 1996 a Natural Reserve of the Biosphere by UNESCO), I intend to portray my love for this region and the admiration and respect I have towards the lives of its fishermen." Though the young boy, Natan (Natan Machado Palombini), will soon leave for Rome, Italy to live with his Italian mother Roberta (Roberta Palombini), she agrees to let him spend time with his father Jorge (Jorge Machado), a spear fisherman, but it will not be for an extended stay. "We'll be gone for a while, and when we come back, you'll go with Mommy," he tells Natan sadly. Jorge lives with his own father, Matraca (Nestor Martin), in a house built on stilts in the middle of the water and their simple life is in harmony with nature. Together they show the young boy the way to reel in a fish, how to spear lobster and barracudas, and how to scale and clean fish for consumption.

Initially seasick, Jorge holds Natan lovingly until his sickness disappears and they are free to navigate the luminous blue-green waters. Together, Jorge, Natan, and Matraca dive under the water where, according to a travel guide for the Costa Maya region of Mexico, "the diving is spectacular with large blue sponges, many fish, turtles, sea walls full of life, and a clear sunlit scenario that includes many sunken ships." What soon becomes evident, beyond the simple satisfaction in life that they experience, is the bond between Jorge and Natan that develops between sleeping in hammocks, drinking strong coffee, and engaging in playful wrestling matches. Natan's new world is far from the challenges of living in a big city. Here there are no I-pods, cell phones, or high-definition TV, only the stark beauty of unspoiled nature.

Important lessons about life are also learned. Natan has his first experience of loss and impermanence when the white bird they named Blanquita which they have been feeding every day, suddenly disappears. Alamar is a hypnotic and poetic film that is a welcome change from the never-ending assembly line of films about social dysfunction of one kind or another. An ode to fatherly love, it is a poignant reminder of the phrase of the Roman poet Ovid who said, "Everything changes, nothing dies." Joy turns to tears, which again turns to joy in an endless cycle, yet, though circumstances change, love is a constant that endures.


12 of 14 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 31 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site [France]

Country:

Mexico

Language:

Spanish | Italian

Release Date:

14 July 2010 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

To the Sea See more »

Filming Locations:

Quintana Roo, Mexico

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,668, 18 July 2010

Gross USA:

$61,613

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$303,574
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed