Woodstock 99: Peace Love and Rage (2021) Poster

User Reviews

Review this title
75 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
3/10
My Wife and I are now 70 years old and attended the 1969 and 1999 Festivals
Watson998 August 2021
My wife and I discussed the things that were most memorable. The positive - great music and everyone was pleasant with the exception of a small percentage of attendees that decided to wreck the place! Yes...the music was energizing and that is why we attended.

The negative - horrible port-o-cans! We took showers and we drank the free water. What they do not mention and we were there, unlike the "journalists" who were not, is that the locals and people that did not pay for tickets were the ones that started tearing down the poster wall. They had been outside the walls for hours and were doing their best to disrupt the event because they could not gain entry without tickets. Yes, there was violence just as there was in 1969, which was not all about love, peace and music despite the "memories" they try to project. 500,000 attendees and possibly 50 were starting fires and 150 were breaking things. Woodstock 1969 was a far worse experience than 1999!
42 out of 51 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
Interesting, but Flawed
acrotinger26 July 2021
Even though I was only 6 years old at the time of Woodstock '99, I've always been interested in learning why exactly the festival failed so spectacularly.

Color me shocked that the root of all evil was aggressive white men and not the total failure of the event promoters to provide an adequate venue and supplies for attendees.

Going to a rock concert is a great place to let out your aggressions but when you're greeted with 100+ degree heat, no easy access to water or shade, and limited staff over a three day period, is a recipe for disaster.

This documentary felt like it was paid for by the Woodstock promoters to point the blame everywhere else but at themselves.

Side note, Moby is the second most pretentious interviewee in this doc right after New York Times journalist Wesley Morris.
67 out of 85 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
This could have been a very interesting documentary.
duane-weaver1627 July 2021
This could have been a very interesting documentary, unfortunately it was polluted with commentary from a bunch of egotistical, self-righteous nitwits with their psychobabble nonsense.

And Moby, stop crying because your name wasn't on the wood sign with the names of the other acts.
88 out of 117 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
Had potential...
asachse-0995631 July 2021
It started off interesting, I was engaged for a while. Then it suddenly veered off into a cultural critique of the late 90s using very progressive morals of today (I am saying this as someone who is a progressive). I pretty quickly lost interest as it wasn't what I thought it'd be and turned it off after about an hour.

If you're looking for an expose on what went wrong at Woodstock 99 this isn't it. If you're looking for a progressive cultural critique that contradicts itself over and over then you've found it. It's a shame as it seemed like an interesting idea.
77 out of 102 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
Disjointed mess just like the concert
chris-6862027 July 2021
The documentary is kind of all over the place. It starts to talk about certain subjects gets halfway to the point they're trying to make and then switches gears to another subject to only do the same thing. Spends a lot of time talking about how it's all white frat males and has a couple of the attendees talking about their experiences there, but then leaves it up to the women and the black male to try and explain what the white males were all about in the 90's and what their mindset was.
85 out of 114 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Great if you cut out all the commentators who weren't there
RaeGal-446118 August 2021
Why ruin this by bringing up current issues. This experience literally has thousands of white people supporting black people and you still find fault. If this documentary really focused on the music it would have been so much better. This woke garbage needs to end. It's bad enough we have to hear it today, let's go back to the past and analyze the history that doesn't fit the narrative.

How about wyclif and jimmy both playing the star spangled banner?? Let's look at that. Everything is ruined by politics and I am over it.
39 out of 52 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
The perfect end to Woodstock!
jjpalmer9024 July 2021
There is such irony in the ideology that brought about the original Woodstock that lead to this. The whole "do what feels good" lifestyle that lead from peace and free love to groping random women at a 90's rock concert. The documentary is certainly entertaining to watch and quite comprehensive. I will say that it is worth a watch. However, listening to a bunch of ideologues who spend the whole time trying to place the blame for this mess on everything from racism to corporate greed gets annoying over time. Woodstock '99 was exactly what it should've been. Like every social experiment that failed, the hippy philosophy went exactly where it should have. One other disappointing aspect was the use of the past tense to describe the generation involved in this as if society today is any better. You can look at the political riots of last year to remind you that this mess continues. However this ends, is anybody's guess, but the story certainly isn't over. I only wish that someone had actually learned something from Woodstock '99. Maybe after watching this, some people will re-evaluate their values.
87 out of 124 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
Enjoyable But Focused on the Wrong Aspects
cbrueggemeyer26 July 2021
I thought that this was an enjoyable and entertaining documentary but it watched more like a college film thesis then a true-to-form found footage documentary. While it is always important to highlight the social and cultural ramifications of an event such as this, I felt the filmmakers spent too much time trying to explain what happened during the festival and compare it to modern events.

This is an insanely entertaining and bewildering story to tell and there is real footage of everything that happened - show it to us! I thought this documentary had a very loose and unstructured feeling: it didn't know what it wanted to say but it tired to hard to say something.

I think with a documentary such as this if you just gave a thorough detailing of events with background from performers and attendees then that would be enough. We don't need New York Times writers hypothesizing about why they thought people were angry in the late 90s or concert attendees giving us their "woke" take 20 years after the fact about what happened.

The sheer absurdity of this event is enough to make a compelling and honest documentary. For me, this came down to too much speculation and opinion and not enough objective footage of the event itself (the subject of the documentary).
52 out of 72 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Blame every one except for the promoter
dwpaintitup8 August 2021
First of all I was there.they caged people up and treated them like dogs.everything was crazy expensive.if you wanted to eat and drink clean water it cost you easily $120-150 a day.porta johns were disgusting day 1 before the music even began.by day 2 there was a water shortage.a bag of ice was $35.if you bought a beer there you "weren't allowed to leave the "beer garden" so you couldn't even enjoy music while you drank.not the promoters fault though. This docu is somewhat correct about the conditions but all the blaming what happened on the bands or people there is straight b.s. They got everything they deserved after treating everyone like dogs.
22 out of 28 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Beware the Jabberwocky
bokonon8225 July 2021
I mean white boys.

Jesus, this documentary doesn't know what it wants to say. On one hand it seems to portray '69 and '94 as utopia. On the other, it briefly recognizes '69 was NOT anything like utopia. What problems were grunge bands fighting against? That was a very nihilistic genre, imho. Also, grunge didn't die with Kurt. Pearl Jam still had 3 great albums to come (vitology, no code, yield) and several ok albums.

The WATER was the reason for the riot and frankly, they were somewhat justified.

Nu Metal as a genre was sort of a lower middle class "white trash" form of hip hop. The 90s were the era of NAFTA and major destruction of the unions. These guys had plenty to be angry about.
79 out of 114 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
ITS ALL ABOUT HOW WHITE MEN ARE BAD & MAD
vnyjwymhyb26 July 2021
They have 2 NY Times Journalists and a couple white bald guys talking about "white privilege" and how "evil" white men are.
112 out of 166 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
White Privilege!! Haha
biggumby-5807226 July 2021
White Privilege!! Come on. I'm not white and there was no white privilege going on there. This Doc is a Joke.
109 out of 163 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Millennials - yawn
jsavtqbm6 August 2021
Made by Millennials for the viewership of Millennials and the dollars that the current outrage culture will get the producers. Cool story bro.
41 out of 58 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
Making a 20yr old music event Woke
jamiesbeck24 July 2021
The movie was very informal and insightful. However it all goes wrong by bringing the current woke narrative of 2020 to something that happened in the past. The points could have still been made without the heavy overtones. It is 100% more cancel culture, cancel history.
135 out of 214 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
2/10
2/10. A 2 hour hit job
wham-7344724 July 2021
This documentary was a 2 hour hit job on the event.... They must have reference ' angry white males' 20 times then showing a metallica moshpit or everyone jumping up and down at the nightly ravevshows- THEY looked like they were having fun- not angry.... Then there was the 20 something female journalist telling us all the girls voluntarily and happily pulling their tops off were victims of a this male culture that sexualizes women.- the guys are 20...yes its what they think about!.. .. And finally they went after kid rot fo appropriating rap into his rock(because he is conservative)..But loved how korm did it...
111 out of 177 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
A good laugh if you're looking for one.
alwaysarcadefiring29 July 2021
I think my favorite part was all the men talking about how disgusting misogyny is - while making sure that the documentary utilized every topless female video they could get their hands on from Woodstock 1999. I'm a woman, just stating my impression of it.

It seemed like a group of individuals trying to backpedal on their participation in this event over two decades ago. I don't even feel like Woodstock 1999 was the main point of the film, it was just hours of interviews of people complaining. In addition, almost all interviewees were white men, talking about how evil all the white men involved were.

Odd to watch, gave me a lot of good laughs, so at least it did that.

Cheers to giving it your all in this cash grab!
35 out of 52 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
I was expecting better/more out of this documentary.
laythrom14 August 2021
I'm not exactly sure what the filmmakers were trying to do with this documentary (other than portray the dark side of the festival) but it's construction is haphazard at best.

To sum up the overall feel of it, it is similar to a film student project that spends more time jumping around from point to point rather than breaking up those points into segments and holding them to a "beginning, middle, and an end" model. The overall documentary may have been more enjoyable if it were not so disjointed.

It literally jumps from angst against MTV and teen pop music, to the N-word usage by white people during DMX's set (where the word is frequently used), to the hyper sexualization and sexual assaults/female trophies/breast exposure, to the lack of water/water access and gross conditions, to white impersonation of blacks in regards to the Nu Metal movement, back to feminism and into Columbine and back to the disgusting conditions all within the span of roughly 15-20 minutes. Yes, these items are all connected in some way, shape or form, and they tie into the overall story of what happened, but the manner in which it was presented is problematic.

I think that the overall idea of showing the dark side of the festival is/was important but they could have did a much, much better job in doing so.
7 out of 8 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
Money can't buy the unpredictable... nor avoid it.
jjr-7647412 August 2021
That sums up Woodstock 99. Greedy promoters dreamt of cashing in on ambient nostalgia with line up of already conceited and conventional so called rabble rousers... and it failed, miserably.

This also sums up this documentary.

Greedy filmmakers tried to make money out of a festival fiasco with a line up of convenient but shallow social commentators, and it failed.

The fact that an abused crowd of young party-goers can devolve in a mob of wild.vandals and looters is nothing new, it's usually called spring break.

The fact that an majority of young white people had access to a star studded event where they were allowed to be unpleasant and disrespectful isn't new either, it's called every concert but for a block party.

The facts that women are abused in a drug and alcohol laden event is unfortunately not new at all, it is essentially known as frat parties.

So trying to make a symbol out of a mismanaged money cow event whose milk turned sour, has zero meaningfulness or relevance.

Plus any documentary about a music festival with that little music should be banned anyways. Avoid it.
9 out of 11 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
Status Quo
codymurphy275 August 2021
People quite frankly cant get enough of documentaries in the Netflix era, and this is another heap thrown together to put on the streamed screen.

I was excited to see this, 99 being the time I was growing up and this music meant a lot to me. This documentary leans far too much on accounts from random attendees or other irrelevant people, not enough artist interviews (but too much of Moby), and the fact that they allowed John Scher to say what he did on camera and then put it in the film...its maddening in hindsight.

The positive, ironically, is the negative but necessary light shone on the "white frat boy culture" that reigned at the festival. Truly despicable. It needs to be put out there no matter how grotesque it is to view and hear about. Its hard to shake the feeling that mankind is barreling down towards its ultimate demise, but at the same time watching this makes you realize how immature we are and how far we still need to come as a society, even 22 years later.

Its not like I didn't already feel shame for having liked Limp Bizkit as a 12 year old, but most of all what this documentary showed me was that them having the success they did and winding up in the middle of that ill fated festival was roughly the equivalent of you-know-who entering the 2016 presidential race and winning in spite of a complete lack of competence. And the results being about the same, on a smaller scale.
9 out of 11 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
2/10
Stop with the woke trash!!!
brendonmorgan25 July 2021
This documentary had potential until virtue signaling woke trash started commenting on it. So easy to sit in your lefty tower and judge a music festival. Ugh!
78 out of 128 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
Can we escape wokeness anywhere?
justinmaikranz27 July 2021
They spent 10 minutes critizing the deplorable, bad Caucasian crowd for singing the lyrics of a song, DMX was wanting them to sing... when will it stop. His head will spin if he goes through videos of all rap concerts with the exact same thing, the last 30 years. The destruction and sexual assault were the real crimes here. But everyone' wants to be a part of the victims I guess.
46 out of 73 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Finger pointing, race baiting
hootie-5087928 July 2021
The "film" has nothing that has not already been documented about the problems made worse by lack of organization, lack of resources, and poor environmental conditions.

The amount of finger pointing to whose fault it was and why is ridiculous. The fault is solely at the feet of the promoters who, even know, show no remorse. The constant mention race being a major or motivating factor is absolutely a product of today's race baiting environment. Blaming this disaster because it was an event attended by a large number of white males and not because it was a group of price gouged, inebriated, overwhelmed, and medically vulnerable young people is laughable. Any amount of people put in these conditions would have rioted, revolted, or protested the conditions created by the promoters. Any large group of people will break down as a result.

It is easy with hindsight to frame your film to any narrative you choose but we have seen these festival deteriorate before or at the very least been on the verge of deteriorating being a result of greed and/or poor planning. Even the original Woodstock.

It is sad that Bill Simmons' name is associated with this project.

This film adds NOTHING that could not be found in other multiple sources.
39 out of 61 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
What a joke of a documentary
laserbiz25 July 2021
Trying to force a narrative from today on to an event from twenty years ago. From Woodstock 69 to 94 to 99 (not to mention the US festival of 83) all were great events but to assign white kids as the problem with 99 is like the woke assigning blame for slavery to the white race of today...GET REAL!
70 out of 116 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Complete Trash
mlcrawford-8081326 July 2021
Should be rated a -10. This film is 90% about the angry white man, and only 10% about what happened. Just complete liberal trash.
64 out of 106 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
3/10
WOKE HISTORY
thawk-4436828 August 2021
You know how they have that show Drunk History? Well this "documentary" should be retitled "Woke History - Episode 1". Just imagine if every moment in history was retold through the eyes of a self righteous group of woke individuals who basically spent every chance they got on a soap box using confounding logic to boil down every ill of society to one root cause, white male privilege.

Would you watch that show? If you would, then this documentary is for you. Go see it!

Unfortunately, i feel like this could've been a good documentary. But the criticisms are misguided and cringe worthy at too many points in the movie. I had to turn it off after about an hour.
10 out of 13 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews


Recently Viewed