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‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ Review: Tragedy, Triumph, Cartoons

‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot’ Review: Tragedy, Triumph, Cartoons
On the surface, it sounds like one of those true-life, triumph-over-adversity tearjerkers that Hollywood spoon-feeds folks with numbing frequency. But thankfully, Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot approaches the cliff of sentiment without going over the edge. Based on the 1989 memoir by Portland, Oregon cartoonist John Callahan, the film traces what happens when this party-hard, skirt-chasing boozehound is rendered a wheelchair-bound quadriplegic by an alcohol-fueled car accident. His journey from wallowing in despair to becoming a successful satirical cartoonist makes the usual stops at physical therapy sessions and work-the-program meetings,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Serbia, Norway projects among winners at When East Meets West co-pro forum

Winners include Dusan Milic’s latest feature Darkling and Hans Lukas Hansen’s ‘docu-fantasy’ The Quest For Tonewood.

Source: Facebook/Katja Goljat, Matjaz Rust

When East Meets West 2018 prize presentation

Projects from Serbia, Norway and the Czech Republic were among the winners at the 8th edition of the When East Meets West (Wemw) co-production forum held during this week’s Trieste Film Festival.

The three-day event ended on Tuesday evening with the presentation of Cannes Producers Network Award of free accreditation for Serbian writer-director Dusan Milic’s latest feature Darkling, which he describes as “arthouse with a touch of psychological horror”, and for Norwegian documentary filmmaker Hans Lukas Hansen’s “docu-fantasy” The Quest For Tonewood about the quest for the magical wood to make the finest violins in the world.

In addition, a Hot Docs Industry Pass was awarded to award-winning Serbian documentary filmmaker Srdjan Sarenac for his new project Prison Beauty Contest, which follows the staging
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Young and the Restless Spoilers: Dr. Harris and Victor Locate Chloe and Kevin

Young and the Restless fans are so caught up in so many story lines right now it’s hard to figure out where things are going, who is where, and what is going on to be honest. With that said, we’ve decided we want to focus on Dr. Harris and Chloe for the moment. When she and Kevin escape from the good doctor and his bad news, we are going to find out that there is a big situation going on. Dr. Harris makes a call almost immediately to Victor and he finds them. It takes no time. They actually make

Young and the Restless Spoilers: Dr. Harris and Victor Locate Chloe and Kevin
See full article at TVovermind.com »

The Young and the Restless Spoilers: Kevin’s Life is In Danger

Young and the Restless spoilers are a little bit heavy on Kevin today. We know that Dr. Harris is not happy with his presence in his home, and that he is not happy to have him there ruining all he’s worked for with Victor. So we know now that Harris is planning on turning against Kevin to plot against him. We don’t know if he plans on killing Kevin or if he merely plans on making his enemy go away. We don’t know, but we do know that there is a chance someone is getting hurt here. That’s not

The Young and the Restless Spoilers: Kevin’s Life is In Danger
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Young and the Restless: Whose Side is Dr. Harris On?

Young and the Restless fans are dying to know what Dr. Harris is doing. He’s got so much going on, and we can’t figure it out. With Kevin and Chloe standing there pointing guns in his face and arguing with him, it’s amazing to us he didn’t just let them run off and deal with Victor later. They are coming up with a plan, and we hear said plan involves Kevin bringing Bella to the doctor’s house to live with Chloe in secret while he treats her. The plan is to say nothing to Victor about any of it –

Young and the Restless: Whose Side is Dr. Harris On?
See full article at TVovermind.com »

The underrated film acting performances of 2016

Mark Harrison Jan 6, 2017

Viola Davis, John Goodman, Bryce Dallas Howard and more, in our rundown of 2016's underrated movie acting work.

This article contains minor spoilers for Pete's Dragon, Suicide Squad and Warcraft: The Beginning.

Nobody is likely to look back on 2016 fondly, whether because of global political instability, celebrity deaths or the rejection of Boaty McBoatface as a suitable name for a research vessel. In the world of film, we note that a lot of the contenders in this year's awards season haven't even been released in UK cinemas yet, and it was hardly a banner year for blockbuster cinema either.

On the plus side, there were some exemplary smaller films, of the kind that awards bodies tend to overlook, released in the last 12 months. Without any apparent genre contenders, like The Martian or Mad Max: Fury Road in 2015, this is a year in which performers are more likely
See full article at Den of Geek »

Moby Dick

I have a back file of reader notes asking for a Blu-ray for John Huston’s Moby Dick, and more pointedly, wondering what will be done with its strange color scheme. I wasn’t expecting miracles, but this new Twilight Time disc should make the purists happy – it has approximated the film’s original, heavily muted color scheme.

Moby Dick

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1956 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 116 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring Gregory Peck, Richard Basehart, Leo Genn, James Robertson Justice,

Harry Andrews, Orson Welles, Bernard Miles, Mervyn Johns, Noel Purcell, Frederick Ledebur

Cinematography Oswald Morris

Art Direction Ralph W. Brinton

Film Editor Russell Lloyd

Original Music Philip Sainton

Writing credits Ray Bradbury and John Huston

Produced and Directed by John Huston

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Talk about a picture with a renewed reputation… in its day John Huston’s Moby Dick was not considered a success,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘When We Rise’ Trailer: Gus Van Sant and Dustin Lance Black Reunite for Lgbtq Miniseries Starring Guy Pearce

  • Indiewire
‘When We Rise’ Trailer: Gus Van Sant and Dustin Lance Black Reunite for Lgbtq Miniseries Starring Guy Pearce
Gus Van Sant’s last few movies haven’t been met with especially warm receptions: “Sea of Trees” was perhaps the most derided film to premiere at Cannes last year, and neither “Promised Land” nor “Restless” fared especially well either. For his next effort, he’s moving to the small screen with “When We Rise,” a docudrama miniseries coming to ABC next year. Watch its first trailer below.

Read More: Why A24 Picked Up Gus Van Sant’s Critical Dud ‘The Sea of Trees

Van Sant will direct the first two hours of the seven-part series, with Dee Rees, Thomas Schlamme and Dustin Lance Black (who also wrote and created) also onboard as directors. “When We Rise” begins in 1971, just two years after the Stonewall riots — whose most recent cinematic depiction came courtesy of Roland Emmerich and wasn’t any more well received than “Sea of Trees” — and continues from there.
See full article at Indiewire »

Despite Some Missteps, ‘The Free World’ Starring Elisabeth Moss & Boyd Holbrook Is An Admirable Indie Drama [Review]

This is a reprint of our review from the 2016 Sundance Film Festival.

Actor and writer Jason Lew, the screenwriter behind Gus Van Sant‘s “Restless,” makes his feature directorial debut with “The Free World,” a sometimes-curious picture that takes on a big story with an intimate execution. “Curious” only because “The Free World” ends up in a place vastly different from where it starts, genre-hopping and taking unexpected turns.

Continue reading Despite Some Missteps, ‘The Free World’ Starring Elisabeth Moss & Boyd Holbrook Is An Admirable Indie Drama [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Elisabeth Moss And Boyd Holbrook Fight For The Free World In First Trailer For Abuse Drama

Two weeks out from its bow in select theaters, IFC Films has dropped the first trailer for Jason Lew’s (Restless) poignant drama The Free World, which sees Elisabeth Moss and Boyd Holbrook fighting two very different forms of abuse.

Holbrook, for instance, plays ex-con Mo who takes the defining first steps towards starting a new life by working in an animal shelter, overseeing the protection of wounded or stray pets under the guidance of Octavia Spencer’s character. Meanwhile, Doris (Elisabeth Moss) has her own cross to carry, symbolizing a pain that so often originates from her abusive relationship with her hothead police officer of a husband.

Those two paths cross when Doris pays a visit to Mo’s animal shelter, but will their budding friendship help or hinder each respective predicament? Today’s first trailer hints that it could well be the latter.

Jason Lew will beckon viewers
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Elisabeth Moss and Boyd Holbrook Journey to ‘The Free World’ in First Trailer

Premiering at Sundance earlier this year, The Free World marks the directorial debut from Jason Lew (Restless), and IFC Films has now released the first trailer. The film begins as a study of rehabilitation as ex-con Mo (Boyd Holbrook) works at an animal shelter under the tutelage of Linda (Octavia Spencer), clearing cages and shows a tender care for the battered animals brought in. One day, Doris (Elisabeth Moss) brings in her dog Charlie, seemingly beaten by her aggressive hothead police officer husband. Things then start to spiral downhill for our characters from there.

I said in my review, “The greatest southern gothic tales feature richly detailed atmosphere dripping with a strong sense of location. Night of the Hunter and other classics certainly fit the category, and the fairly recent Sundance drama Ain’t Them Bodies Saints was a fine example, featuring characters that, whether in a doomed romance or not,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Matthew McConaughey and Ken Watanabe Search ‘The Sea of Trees’ In New Trailer for Gus Van Sant Drama

Every couple of weeks, I’ll wonder what happened to Gus Van Sant, that thought process always along the lines of, “So there was Restless in 2010, Promised Land in 2012, and nothing since then? What could he be doing?” And then I remember The Sea of Trees, the cause celebre (read: laughingstock) of last year’s Cannes Film Festival, and suddenly grow a bit sadder.

We already got a glimpse of the film ahead of its Japanese release; now the French opening has offered another preview. (Roadside Attractions will bring it to the U.S., but no word yet on when that might be.) While I’m willing to believe the reaction was overcooked and liked what’s shown herein — Matthew McConaughey! Naomi Watts! Ken Watanabe! beautiful locations! — that reaction also connects to our review in a rather uncomfortable way. As we said, “The genuinely captivating ambiguity of these early moments
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tribeca ‘16: First wave unveils split Narrative competition and record breaking female directors

The first wave of films screening at the 15th Tribeca Film Festival have been announced and this year, the Narrative program has been split into two separate sections: the Us Narrative competition which celebrates the works of American filmmakers and the International Narrative competition which will showcase cinematic works spanning five continents.

With one third of the Festival’s feature films being directed by women – the highest percentage in history – the Festival is becoming renown for its discovery of new and distinct voices.

“In our 15th year we wanted to deepen our support of American narrative filmmakers and have opened our competition to separately showcase the Us and International films,” said Genna Terranova, Festival Director. “We are very impressed by the films this year and inspired to see new voices transcending traditions and taking risks by telling their stories their own way. We are excited to share with audiences how
See full article at The Hollywood News »

[Sundance Review] The Free World

The greatest southern gothic tales feature richly detailed atmosphere dripping with a strong sense of location. Night of the Hunter and other classics certainly fit the category, and the fairly recent Sundance drama Ain’t Them Bodies Saints was a fine example, featuring characters that, whether in a doomed romance or not, feel destined for one another. On paper, The Free World seemingly has all the necessary ingredients, yet the drama stumbles out of the gate with cliche after cliche, even when it tries to change things up with a sharp dramatic turn.

Beginning as a study of rehabilitation, Mo (Boyd Holbrook) recently got out of a prison stint in which he became defined as the toughest inmate, earning the nickname “Cyclops.” Working at an animal shelter under the tutelage of Linda (Octavia Spencer), he cleans cages and shows a tender care for the battered animals brought in. One day,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Sundance Review: 'The Free World' Starring Boyd Holbrook, Elisabeth Moss & Octavia Spencer

Actor and writer Jason Lew, the screenwriter behind Gus Van Sant's "Restless," makes his feature directorial debut with “The Free World,” a sometimes-curious picture that takes on a big story with an intimate execution. “Curious” only because “The Free World” ends up in a place vastly different from where it starts, genre-hopping and taking unexpected turns. At times it feels as though the story might exceed the scope of the film, but it manages to stretch to contain it, and pushes the boundaries of what a “Sundance film” might be. The film opens with a look inside the very small world of Mo (Boyd Holbrook). He’s a recently released felon working in an animal shelter for Linda (Octavia Spencer), who seems to have knowledge of “the inside” as well. He has a sparse life, an apartment with no furniture and no car. As we come to find out through snippets of conversation,
See full article at The Playlist »

Our 25 Most-Anticipated Films of Sundance Film Festival 2016

Comprising a considerable amount of our top 50 films of last year, Sundance Film Festival has proven to yield the first genuine look at what the year in cinema will bring. Now in its 38th iteration, we’ll be heading back to Park City this week, but before we do, it’s time to highlight the films we’re most looking forward to, including documentaries and narrative features from all around the world.

While much of the joy found in the festival comes from surprises throughout the event, below one will find our 25 most-anticipated titles off the bat, which doesn’t include some of the ones we’ve already seen and admired, notably Cemetery of Splendour, The Lobster and Rams. Check out everything below and for updates straight from the festival, make sure to follow us on Twitter (@TheFilmStage, @jpraup, @djmecca and @DanSchindel), and stay tuned to all of our coverage here.
See full article at The Film Stage »

2016 Sundance Film Festival Predictions: Jason Lew’s The Free World

Best known as the writer for the Gus Van Sant directed Restless back in 2011 and he also moonlights as an actor, Jason Lew originally mounted this directorial debut with major starlets in Cillian Murphy and Bryce Dallas Howard but it ended up being American indie players Boyd Holbrook and Elizabeth Moss who would transition into the roles of Mo and Doris. A film of broken spirits and strays (this includes a pooch) with criminal backgrounds, production on The Free World began this past July in New Orleans.

Gist: Mo (Holbrook) has finished serving his time for a brutal crime he did not commit—the murder of two young girls. In prison, his fellow inmates named him “The Cyclops” for his violent behaviour he called himself Mohamed, in homage to the prophet. Not entirely prepared for his new freedom and under constant suspicion by the small town community, he finds solace
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Chin Han Joins Independence Day 2

Another day, another new face added to the burgeoning cast of Independence Day 2 – today brings word that Chin Han, the up-and-comer who appeared in Netflix’s Marco Polo and had a small part in The Dark Knight, has joined the blockbuster sci-fi sequel in a key role.

Han, who worked with ID2 director Roland Emmerich on disaster epic 2012, will play the leader of the Chinese Space Squadron, an invaluable asset in combatting a new extraterrestrial threat. His other projects have included Contagion, Restless and IFC’s The Spoils Before Dying.

The actor joins a cast that currently includes franchise newbies Maika Monroe (The Guest, It Follows), Jessie Usher (Starz’s Survivor’s Remorse), Liam Hemsworth (The Hunger Games), Sela Ward (The Day After Tomorrow), Travis Tope (The Town That Dreaded Sundown), Garrett Wareing (Boychoir), William Fichtner (Drive Angry) and Charlotte Gainsbourg (Nymphomaniac) alongside returning actors Judd Hirsch, Bill Pullman, Vivica A. Fox and Jeff Goldblum.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

2015 Cannes Critics’ Panel Day 4: Sea of Trees “Gerry”manders Critics

A film that explores the suicide theme might have become the first Croisette casualty, hara-kiri style. He has had a lengthy, healthy career moving between micro indie and studio projects, Sea of Trees follows in the footsteps of Milk, Restless (Un Certain Regard selection) and Promised Land. Palme d’Or winner back in 2003 for Elephant, Gus Van Sant‘s fourth film to appear in the Main Competition got an early screening the day before, and the response is reminiscent of how Even Cowgirls Get the Blues was critically received. Starring Matthew McConaughey who plays an American who travels to Japan’s “suicide forest” after the death of his wife (Naomi Watts) this also features Ken Watanabe.

Check back with us twice daily for the latest grades and make sure to click on the grid below for a larger version.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes: Gus Van Sant and Matthew McConaughey Tackle 'The Sea of Trees' Takedowns

Cannes: Gus Van Sant and Matthew McConaughey Tackle 'The Sea of Trees' Takedowns
Read More: The Indiewire 2015 Cannes Bible Many people — Indiewire included — came to the 2015 Cannes Film Festival hoping for a major comeback from Gus Van Sant, who is in competition for this year's Palme d'Or for his drama "The Sea of Trees," written by "Buried" scribe Chris Sparling. Van Sant, an indie icon and Palme d'Or winner for 2003's "Elephant," has in recent years misfired with the tepidly received dramas "Restless" and "Promised Land." Unfortunately, as Indiewire's Eric Kohn put it bluntly in his scathing review following last night's first screening, "The Sea of Trees" is the filmmaker's "worst" yet. Kohn is not alone; the solemn drama was met with the first loud boos of the festival. (This writer sat next to a man who hissed as the credits rolled!) "Anyone has as much right to boo as they do to ovate," said "Sea of Trees" star...
See full article at Indiewire »
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