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Oliver Stone’s ‘The Putin Interviews’ Picked Up Internationally, Including in Russia

Oliver Stone’s ‘The Putin Interviews’ Picked Up Internationally, Including in Russia
Oliver Stone’s televised interviews with Vladimir Putin will be seen in the Russian president’s homeland and in other countries around the world where broadcasters have snapped up the four-part series.

The Putin Interviews” went out on Showtime in the U.S. earlier this month over four nights and was simulcast on Sky in Britain and Germany. National Geographic has now taken rights across Southeast Asia and the Middle East, as well as for Belgium and the Netherlands. Channel One will show the interviews in Russia.

Im Global Television is distributing the series and has also sold it to Sbs in Australia. In Europe, Dr has it in Denmark, Iti in Poland, and Ftv in Czech Republic. In Spain, it will air on pay-tv, on the Movistar+ platform.

The Putin Interviews” was produced by Fernando Sulichin (“The Untold History of the United States”), New Element Media and Rob Wilson. The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oliver Stone’s ‘The Putin Interviews’: Why the Showtime Series Could Help the Legendary Filmmaker Get His Mojo Back

Oliver Stone’s ‘The Putin Interviews’: Why the Showtime Series Could Help the Legendary Filmmaker Get His Mojo Back
Oliver Stone and Vladimir Putin are a match made in heaven. Stone’s upcoming documentary series “The Putin Interviews” could be just the project to give the filmmaker’s career the shot in the arm in desperately needs. The director of iconic films like “Platoon” and “JFK” has never wavered from tackling challenging political stories, both documentaries and narrative features, but the results as of late have been lackluster.

Read More: Michael Moore on Broadway: 5 Things You Should Know About His Attack on Trump

“The Putin Interviews,” a four-night series airing on Showtime this June, could change all that. While Stone has always been an outspoken critic of governments around the world, the recent rise of issues like surveillance, hacking and cyberwarfare have made him even more energized, and concerned, about current events.

“What’s going on right now is pretty shocking,” Stone said at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival.
See full article at Indiewire »

Oliver Stone Interviews Vladimir Putin, Uncensored, in Showtime’s New Documentary Series ‘The Putin Interviews’

Oliver Stone Interviews Vladimir Putin, Uncensored, in Showtime’s New Documentary Series ‘The Putin Interviews’
Oliver Stone has interviewed Russian president Vladimir Putin more than a dozen times over the past two years. Now, Stone and his documentary producer Fernando Sulichin have turned those chats into “The Putin Interviews,” a four-hour documentary series airing over four nights this June on Showtime.

Check out a first look at “The Putin Interviews” below. Stone most recently interviewed Putin in February, after the U.S. presidential elections (in which Putin and Russia are believed to have actively influenced). Showtime compares “The Putin Interviews” to David Frost’s famed conversations with Richard Nixon in 1977.

Stone and Sulichin were granted wide access to Putin’s personal and professional lives. “It’s not a documentary as much as a question and answer session,” Stone told the Sydney Morning Herald. “”It opens up a whole viewpoint that we as Americans haven’t heard… He talks pretty straight. I think we did him
See full article at Indiewire »

Oliver Stone’s Vladimir Putin Interviews to Air on Showtime as Four-Hour Documentary

Oliver Stone’s Vladimir Putin Interviews to Air on Showtime as Four-Hour Documentary
Snagging an interview with Russian President Vladimir Putin has stood as a Holy Grail for several news organizations. ABC NewsGeorge Stephanopoulos has been pursuing just such a “get,” and the idea has surfaced elsewhere as well. Premium cable network Showtime appears to have gotten the scoop.

The CBS Corp.-owned pay-cable network will over four consecutive nights in June air “The Putin Interviews,” a series of conversations between filmmaker Oliver Stone and the Russian chief of state. The documentary program will debut on Monday, June 12, at 9 p.m. eastern, with three more segments slated to appear over the next three nights.

“If Vladimir Putin is indeed the great enemy of the United States, then at least we should try to understand him,” Stone said in a prepared statement.

Stone and his longtime documentary producer Fernando Sulichin, interviewed the Russian leader more than a dozen times over the course of two years, Showtime
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oliver Stone headed to Zurich fest with 'Snowden'

  • ScreenDaily
Oliver Stone headed to Zurich fest with 'Snowden'
Stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Shailene Woodley also set to attend.

Zurich Film Festival (Sept 22-Oct 2) has landed one of the first screenings of Oliver Stone’s whistleblower drama Snowden and will host the film’s director as well as stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Shailene Woodley.

The gala screening - the first to be announced for this year’s festival - will take place on Sept 24, just weeks after its world premiere at Toronto (Snowden debuted to an invite-only screening at Comic-Con last week).

It marks the fourth visit to Zff for Stone, who was previously the subject of a tribute strand and most recently screened his film Savages as the festival’s opening night gala in 2012.

In Stone’s latest film, Gordon-Levitt stars as Edward J. Snowden, the former National Security Agency (Nsa) employee who blew the whistle on the Us’s mass global surveillance programmes. The cast also includes Woodley, Melissa Leo and [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

San Sebastian's Zabaltegi gets competitive; changes name

  • ScreenDaily
San Sebastian's Zabaltegi gets competitive; changes name
Jury of three to award $22,000 prize in the “open zone” strand.

The 64th San Sebastian Film Festival (Sept 16-24) is to make its Zabaltegi strand competitive and has changed the name of the section to Zabaltegi - Tabakalera.

At the upcoming edition, films will compete for the Zabaltegi - Tabakalera Award and a €20,000 ($22,000) prize, of which €6,000 ($6,600) will go to the director of the winning film and the remaining €14,000 ($15,000) to the distributor of the film in Spain.

The winner will be decided by a jury of at least three professionals from the world of film and culture.

The competition has been established following a pact between the festival and the Tabakalera - International Centre for Contemporary Culture.

The previously non-competitive strand was considered an “open zone” for a variety of films, documentaries, shorts and television - “works with no limitations as regards format or subject matter”.

Zabaltegi has included works by Alexander Sokurov, Laurie Anderson, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Watch: First Trailer For Oliver Stone’s ‘Snowden’ Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Shailene Woodley & Nicolas Cage

Has filmmaker Oliver Stone ever met a political controversy he didn’t want to make into a movie? Though to be fair, the director’s been somewhat inactive in the world of mainstream movies in recent years, focusing on documentaries about the late, former Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. Stone’s last two dramatic features were 2010’s “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,” and 2012’s “Savages,” two forgettable movies that both critics and audiences didn’t really care for. And Stone’s interests seemed to take him elsewhere (“Mi Amigo Hugo” and the 10-part "The Untold History of the United States," the latter of which premiered on Showtime), but the Edward Snowden story seemed to reinvigorate his passion for topical political drama and the project came together really fast. Shot earlier this year in May and due, with a quick turn around, by year’s end, “Snowden” focuses on what else, the
See full article at The Playlist »

Oliver Stone to Tackle an Edward Snowden Movie

Well, I guess this was just a matter of time... But The Guardian UK is reporting that Oliver Stone, the Oscar-winning director of such conspiratorially minded gems as "JFK" and his bafflingly overlooked documentary series "The Untold History of the United States," is set to bring the story of Nsa whistleblower to the big screen in "The Snowden Files," an adaptation of the book written by Luke Harding.

The thriller will, according to the Guardian's report, follow Snowden, an Nsa contractor who decided to leak thousands of classified documents to a former Guardian columnist in June, 2013, causing the government (and everyone else) to seriously reassess the widespread use of surveillance in the United States and elsewhere. (Snowden is in Russia currently seeking asylum and faces a 30-year prison sentence should he ever re-enter the United States.)

This seems like perfect material for Stone, who has built his career around historical
See full article at Moviefone »

Silver screen to small screen: why film directors are taking over TV

After the success of True Detective, award-winning film-makers are being lured to TV with the promise of more creative control, Does this herald a new golden age for viewers?

There was a time when American movie stars and big-ticket directors wouldn't touch TV. Now, thanks to hit series such as True Detective, not only movie actors but major Hollywood directors are flocking to the small screen.

The critical and commercial success of the series starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson – currently on its fourth of eight episodes in Britain – heralds a potential TV revolution in which a series is created in one "block" by a single feature film director – in this case Cary Fukunaga, maker of the 2011 adaptation of Jane Eyre, starring Michael Fassbender.

"Movie directors have flirted with TV for years, but they've typically only done the first episode," explains producer Richard Brown. "TV is made fast, but often lacks the tools of cinema.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Silver screen to small screen: why film directors are taking over TV

After the success of True Detective, award-winning film-makers are being lured to TV with the promise of more creative control, Does this herald a new golden age for viewers?

There was a time when American movie stars and big-ticket directors wouldn't touch TV. Now, thanks to hit series such as True Detective, not only movie actors but major Hollywood directors are flocking to the small screen.

The critical and commercial success of the series starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson – currently on its fourth of eight episodes in Britain – heralds a potential TV revolution in which a series is created in one "block" by a single feature film director – in this case Cary Fukunaga, maker of the 2011 adaptation of Jane Eyre, starring Michael Fassbender.

"Movie directors have flirted with TV for years, but they've typically only done the first episode," explains producer Richard Brown. "TV is made fast, but often lacks the tools of cinema.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Cuba Journal 2: U.S., Revolution and the Caribbean

The first day of the Havana Film Festival I was at the Hotel Nacional, registering for the festival, seeing familiar faces from Cuba and the Caribbean and old friends from the USA: Oleg Vidov and his wife Joan Borsten were there as Oleg who had starred in 3 Soviet films made in Cuba was an honored guest. Havana regulars were there: Marlene Dermer, director of Laliff and Laurie Anne Schag, VP of International Documentary Association. Laurie Anne not only gives tours of Cuba with her colleague Geo Darder, but this year she also screened her film at the festival, the documentary Oshun’s 11 about a tour of the Yoruba Orisha religion in Cuba.

Harlan Jacobson of Talk Cinema and Sarah Miller brought in tours as well and we went together to the Acapulco theater to see the Puerto Rican romantic heist movie Hope, Despair (La Espera Desespera) by writer/ director Coraly Santaliz Perez (♀) . Im Global’s Bonnie Voland the VP of Marketing was there with with Stuart Ford and his friend. Bonnie gave a great presentation on marketing which I will report on in these pages soon. Im Global and Mundial, their their new joint venture with Gael Garcia Bernal, showed The Butler and Bolivar: The Liberator. This new Mundial title was oddly programmed at the same time as the Venezuelan version of the exact same story, Bolivar, el hombre de las dificultades by Luis Alberto Lamata, a Venezuelan-Cuban-Spanish co-production. I wonder if both cinemas were packed or if one was more popular than the other. Publicity and marketing at this festival is a strange and unknown process, though I know Caroline Libresco-produced and Grace Lee-directed American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs brought in audience after a radio interview with Caroline and Grace had aired.

Ruby Rich was also here giving a very interesting presentation on Queer Cinema whose historical roots (Todd Haynes, Derek Jarman) were mostly unknown to the young Cuban audience. She is an old hand in Havana, having attended the festival in the heady days of the 1970s. The theme of homosexuality was prevalent in many of the films this year. A government Institute of Human Sexuality has been established under the leadership of the daughter of Raul Castro, and Cuba has apologized for its past treatment of homosexuality. This reversal has opened the doors of freedom. Filmmaker Enrique Pineda Barnet, the writer of Soy Cuba, the great Russian-Cuban epic, used to have to work underground with his personal homosexual films (After his fame was established with La Bella del Alhambra he was “allowed” to work underground). He is now able to be officially accepted with his works like Verde, Verde which showed in the Festival. Venezuelan Miguel Ferrari’s Azul y no tan rosa was feted for his treatment of this little-discussed issues in his home country.

Enrique Pineda Barnet’s meditation on what it means to be gay in Havana (Verde, Verde) marks his first film in years to be accepted into the official festival.

The U.S. invitees who give workshops here and at the international film school Eictv makes me wonder who is making the connections and how. Last year Hawk Koch and Annette Benning were here and created a support mechanism of AMPAS with the festival. This year, aside from Oleg Vidov Bonnie Voland and Ruby Rich, other American invitees giving workshops included Robert Kraft (Avatar, Titanic, Moulin Rouge) on film music was obviously brought in by the Academy. Mike S. Ryan, an independent filmmaker from New York was the big surprise as we never knew his role as producer of such films as Todd Solondz’s Palindromes and Life During Wartime, Kelly Reichardt’s Old Joy and Ira Sach’s Forty Shades of Blue, Hal Hartley’s Fay Grim and many more including Liberty Kid, the winner of HBO’s Latino Film Festival 2007 and Bela Tarr’s final film, The Turin Horse. His newly finished film is Last Weekend starring Patricia Clarkson and Zachary Booth. This Independent Spirit “Producer of the Year” winner was here working with filmmakers at Eictv, the international film school and also did a presentation in the festival conference series.

Im Global’s Stuart Ford and friend with Bonnie Voland at the Hotel Nacional

Oliver Stone, a favorite of Cuba since his HBO films Comandante and Persona Non Grata, brought in a History Channel doc series called The Untold History of the United States, made up basically of interviews with key people in the eras of World War II: Roosevelt, Truman and Wallace [sic],The Bomb, Cold War: Truman, Wallace [sic], Stalin, Churchill and the Bomb, The 1950s: Eisenhower, The Bomb and The Third World.

A fruit vendor on our walk to the Infanta Theater

Laurie Anne Schag secured radio promotion for Caroline Libresco of Sundance Institute and Grace Lee, here as a producer and director to show their new film: American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs. The audience at the Infanta Theater was mainly brought in by the radio show but also included us, the friends, and the Trinidad + Tobago delegation. The Q&A sessions were informed and informative as the Cubans and Americans discussed the notion of Revolution as put forward by Grace Lee Boggs a 90+ year old community organizer who came out of Barnard College in the 40s to Detroit and has never abandoned her Marxist Socialist standards but recognizes that social revolution can only succeed if the people themselves are revolutionized from grassroots action and within the individuals carrying out the action. Without transformation from within, action to change the government is only a rebellion. So what about the Cuban Revolution? The discussions were very enlightening and the audience felt that this film was new and interesting.

I attended the first of four screenings of Caribbean films hosted by ttff (Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival) at the Infanta Theater. My readers know from my blogs of last November how astonished and moved I was by the population makeup of Trinidad + Tobago and of the Caribbean in general. This area of small islands, formerly colonized by Spanish, French, German and Dutch has created a particular island culture society whose film culture is taking the next evolutionary step. Forming a marketplace and a place of cultural exchange among its constituents, ttff’s director Bruce Paddington is working with Cuba’s national film organization, Icaic’s Luis Notario to develop a real film market for Caribbean film. Apropos, Bruce was also showing his documentary on the Revolution in Grenada, called Foreward Ever: The Killing of a Revolution, which was the motto of Maurice Bishop the elected president who was forcefully removed and murdered by the opposition when the U.S. army under the Commander-in-Chief, President Ronald Reagan sent in forces presumably to protect the American medical students attending medical school there in 1983.

Twenty-five Cubans were also killed in the fighting which ensued on this otherwise always peaceful island where now a reconciliation among neighbors is still in process.

The other four screenings of ttff were varied and interesting in their unique Caribbean points of view. The opening film, Poetry is an Island: Derek Walcott was a portrait of the St. Lucia poet and Nobel Prize winner for literature. The short film, Passage, by Kareem Mortimer, a filmmaker I have known for many years from the Bahamas and Trinidad, was astounding in its recall of one of the most degrading aspects of the slave trade, as black Haitians huddled in the tiny hold of a decrepit fishing boat as they were smuggled into Florida from Haiti. Another short, Auntie, from the Barbados by Lisa Harewood told of a current social issue in which “Aunts” take care of young children while their single mothers go abroad to earn money for their care. As the child in this movie reaches her teen years, her mother sends for her which leaves a grieving single woman “Auntie” alone with no thanks and no child to care for in her older years. Other shorts included The Gardener by Jo Henriquez from Aruba and One Good Deed by Juliette McCawley from Trinidad + Tobago.

The window on Caribbean issues was opened wide. The Barbados comedy Payday in which two friends decide to leave their job as security guards and open their own business was made on a shoe string but gave a picture of how the youth are living today with ganga, grinding dancing, sexy encounters told with a sweet mischievous naughtiness. Songs of Redemption, by Miquel Galofre and Amanda Sans, winner of ttff’s Jury Prize and the Audience Award goes inside what had been Kingston Jamaica’s worst prison until the new prison director introduced classes to educate the prisoners, including a music rehabilition program which goes beyond all expectation… Truly redeeming.

Trinidad + Tobago filmmakers Karim Mortimer from Bahamas, Lisa Harewood from Barbaddos, Alex (Egyptian/ Austrian / Bahamanian business partner of Karim, Shakira Bourne

The film program was suspended for a full day in which all cultural and entertainment events throughout Cuba were cancelled to observe a national day of mourning for Nelson Mandela.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Oliver Stone Speaks at Sliff on the 50th Anniversary of the JFK Assassination

“Back, and to the left… back, and to the left… back, and to the left”

It was the hottest ticket in town on the 50th anniversary of one the most tragic events of the 20th century! Director Oliver Stone, who made the historically dubious, but entertaining as hell JFK in 1991 spent the 50th anniversary of the JFK Assassination here in St. Louis as part of The St. Louis International Film Festival. The event was last night at The Tivoli. The sold-out crowd was treated to a speech by Stone reflecting on the historic date. This was followed by a clip reel highlighting his 40-year Hollywood career (but not a single clip from Seizure!) and a 15-minute segment from his Showtime documentary series ‘The Untold History of the United States‘. After receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award from Cinema St. Louis, Stone took to the stage for an interview moderated by St.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Blu-ray Review: Glorious ‘JFK 50th Commemorative Ultimate Collector’s Edition’

Chicago – Oliver Stone reached the peak of his fascination with controversy, history, and epic productions when he made 1991’s “JFK,” arguably the masterpiece of the director of “Platoon,” “Natural Born Killers,” “Nixon,” and many more beloved films. “JFK” is a remarkable cinematic achievement, a movie that has lost none of its power 22 years after its release, looking like something that could come out today, especially now that we’re in the peak of Kennedy mania as we approach the 50th anniversary of his assassination, one of the most important events in American history.

Rating: 5.0/5.0

Whether or not you believe Stone’s conspiracy-based version of events or not, “JFK” is a masterful film in terms of acting, directing, and every technical element. It is a major accomplishment treated as such in this collector’s edition that includes three other discs besides the Director’s Cut of the film, all feature-length, along with unique physical collectibles.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Sliff 2013: Oliver Stone Headlines the 22nd Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival

The highlight of the 22nd Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival (Sliff), held Nov. 14- 24, (aside from the Ray Harryhausen Tribute November 15th) is an appearance by famed writer/director Oliver Stone. A three-time Academy Award® winner, Stone has written and directed more than 20 feature films, among them some of the most influential and iconic films of the last decades. Stone will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22, at the Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Blvd. Directors who have previously been honored with a Sliff Lifetime Achievement Award include Paul Schrader, John Sayles, Michael Apted, and Joe Dante.

Held on the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, the program will feature a screening of the director’s cut of Stone’s “JFK.” The evening will begin with a clip reel surveying Stone’s career, the presentation of the award, and a conversation between Stone and St.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oliver Stone Looks Back at 'JFK'

Oliver Stone Looks Back at 'JFK'
Ever since President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed on November 22, 1963, many people have wondered: What actually transpired on that Friday in Dallas? Did Lee Harvey Oswald act alone? What about the Cubans and the Mafia? Did our government have something to do with it? 28 years later, filmmaker Oliver Stone created the award-winning movie JFK to illustrate his very personal point of view.

What Are Oliver Stone's 10 Best Movies?

JFK chronicles an investigation by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin Costner) and the subsequent conspiracy case he
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Oliver Stone: “Perfection is the Enemy of Good”

A lot of film fans had their eyes opened by the trippy blur of David Lynch, who showed them that movies need not be literal or especially concerned with losing audience members for one or two or all the moments. For me, such a cinematic shakeup didn’t come from Lynch, but Oliver Stone. Much like his underdog characters, he continually challenges the norms of his field. Throughout his career, Stone has been able to shift between yarns spun with either a calm eye or full-on bombast, whether he’s showing modern gladiators in Any Given Sunday, the fractured life of Richard Nixon, or hell’s dirty underbelly as depicted in U-Turn. It’s also obvious that Stone is a history nut, and, with The Untold History of The United States, he spent these past four years crafting a project he’s called his most “ambitious.” It’s a comprehensive, warts-and-all
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Stack: Before Midnight, Much Ado About Nothing, Night Tide, And More

This week's show is a little light on Halloween goodness but what's there is, is choice. Night Tide is an early Dennis Hopper vehicle full of sea siren sideshows and tragic surrealism. The Purge is one of the better home invasion movies in recent times. Also appearing for the first time on stateside Blu-ray are High Plains Drifter, in which Clint Eastwood may or may not be a ghost, the shorts compilation Chilling Visions (go Emily M. Hagins), and the scary no matter how you look at it The Untold History of the United States from Oliver Stone. You can watch the entire video below. Bat Country shirt by Harebrained ...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Michel Gondry Premiere Animates Doc NYC Slate

Michel Gondry Premiere Animates Doc NYC Slate
Doc NYC, the Gotham documentary festival that launched in 2010, has lined up a broad slate with 11 world premieres, including the debut of Michel Gondry’s doc “Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy? An Animated Conversation with Noam Chomsky.”

Film, in which Gondry interviews linguist Chomsky and illustrates his ideas with animation, will close the fourth annual festival, which launches this year with the New York City bow of Errol MorrisDonald Rumsfeld pic “The Unknown Known.” Doc NYC lineup will encompass 72 features and 39 shorts, which fest organizers bill as the largest documentary festival in country.

Other titles screening as galas during Doc NYC include John Maloof and Charlie Siskel’s “Finding Vivian Maier,” about a little-known photographer, and “Marvin Hamlisch: What He Did For Love,” Dori Berinstein’s look at the late songsmith of “A Chorus Line.”

Festival slate is divided into about a dozen sections including two juried,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oliver Stone slams 'Breaking Bad' finale, 'Superman vs. 'Batman' and Michael Bay movies

  • Pop2it
While promoting his Showtime docu-series, "The Untold History of the United States," multiple Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone went off on a pretty major rant about the state of American movies and the "joke" that was the "Breaking Bad" finale.

Stone, who admittedly does "not watch ['Breaking Bad'] very much," but "happened to tune in" to the series finale, tells the press the series ending was "the most ridiculous 15 minutes of a movie -- it would be laughed off the screen." 

[Note: Major spoilers ahead for those still hoarding the finale on their Dvrs.]

Regarding Walter White's (Bryan Cranston) approach to the gang who kidnapped Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Stone says, "Nobody could park his car right then and there, and could have a machine gun that could go off perfectly and kill all of the bad guys! It would be a joke." 

He then seques into slamming the current crop of DC Comics films. "It's only in the movies that you find this kind of fantasy violence.
See full article at Pop2it »

Oliver Stone slams 'Breaking Bad' finale for That scene

Oliver Stone slams 'Breaking Bad' finale for That scene
Oliver Stone still knows how to get people rankled. The Platoon, Savages and Natural Born Killers director reportedly slammed the finale of AMC’s Breaking Bad while promoting his documentary series The Untold History of the United States.

Stone took issue with Breaking Bad as part of a larger critique of cinema violence having become less realistic and more cartoonish over the years. “There’s too much violence in our movies – and it’s all unreal to me,” he said. “I don’t know if you saw the denouement [of Breaking Bad], I happen to not watch the series very much, but I
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »
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