Father Knows Best (1954–1960)
7.5/10
15
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Betty Goes Steady 

At college, Betty is enjoying the social life and is going steady with a casual acquaintance. Bud works on the school paper and brings home Mr. Beekman, the paper's adviser. Mr. Beekman tells Betty there is more to life than parties.

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(characters), (story and teleplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Jim Anderson
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Betty Anderson
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Kathy Anderson
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Mr. Beekman
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Dotty Snow
Ken Clayton ...
Roger Kohlhoff
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Bookstacker in library
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Storyline

At college, Betty is enjoying the social life and is going steady with a casual acquaintance. Bud works on the school paper and brings home Mr. Beekman, the paper's adviser. Mr. Beekman tells Betty there is more to life than parties.

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Genres:

Comedy | Family

Certificate:

TV-G
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Release Date:

5 December 1956 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Beware of the In Crowd
11 April 2016 | by See all my reviews

"Father Knows Best" is often dismissed as nothing but typical 1950s conformist fare -- but in more than one episode, the series actually questioned the then-current status quo in small but telling ways.

In this episode, college girl Betty is happy to follow the social rules for acceptance by the college's "In Crowd" that dictates who's acceptable & who's not. And as more than one character exclaims in horror, anyone who flouts those rules "might as well be dead!" Betty's complacency is challenged by Mr. Beekman, a fellow student who also teaches some high school classes for Betty's brother Bud. He encourages asking "Why?" of anyone or anything that demands unquestioning obedience. This doesn't sit well with Betty, whose own conscience is fighting her complacency. And then -- but watch the episode.

All in all, for what's considered a lightweight 1950s sitcom, this is reasonably thoughtful stuff. I'd imagine that more than one viewer might have been inspired to read Emerson, whose essay "Self-Reliance" is mentioned & quoted more than once, after watching this half-hour episode.


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