Mad Men (2007–2015)
8.5/10
1,344
3 user 7 critic

Seven Twenty Three 

As Don secures an account with Conrad Hilton, Sterling and Cooper try to strong-arm Don into signing a contract. Meanwhile, Betty meets with her acquaintance from the governor's office, and Duck tries to get Peggy to leave Sterling Cooper.

Writers:

Matthew Weiner (created by), André Jacquemetton | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Jon Hamm ... Don Draper
Elisabeth Moss ... Peggy Olson
Vincent Kartheiser ... Pete Campbell
January Jones ... Betty Draper
Christina Hendricks ... Joan Harris (credit only)
Bryan Batt ... Salvatore Romano
Michael Gladis ... Paul Kinsey
Aaron Staton ... Ken Cosgrove (credit only)
Rich Sommer ... Harry Crane
Robert Morse ... Bertram Cooper
John Slattery ... Roger Sterling
Jared Harris ... Lane Pryce
Mark Moses ... Duck Phillips
Kiernan Shipka ... Sally Draper
Chelcie Ross ... Connie
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Storyline

Don's acquaintance, Connie, better known to the rest of the world as Conrad Hilton, stops by the office on an unexpected visit. As a start, he wants to transfer the advertising business of his New York hotels to Sterling Cooper. Don is reluctant to specify the nature of Connie's visit to the staff, who are all abuzz about Don even knowing the powerful Hilton, let alone the possibility of working on a campaign for Hilton Hotels. On the pretense of the new Hilton account, Bertram, Roger and Lane discuss an administrative issue with Don. Betty gets caught in the middle of the battle between Don and the partners. Don himself gets caught up in two other unusual incidents, the first with Sally's teacher Miss Farrell, and the second with a couple he picks up who are hitchhiking to Niagara Falls. Both incidents make him ponder his future. At the office, Pete has definitely made up his mind not to accept Duck's offer for a position at Gray Advertising, especially with the possibility of the ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 September 2009 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Peggy mentions she's read Conrad Hilton's book, she's referring to his 1959 autobiography, "Be My Guest." See more »

Goofs

As Draper signs his contract (with the date 7/23/1963, the number referenced in the episode title), the last part of the company name can be seen in the signatory section, and it ends with "L.L.C." Limited Liability Companies weren't in common use in the US until the late 1970s, and prior to that many states had no laws governing their existence. See more »

Quotes

Peggy Olson: What do you want from me?
Herman 'Duck' Phillips: I wanna take you in that bedroom, lock the door, take your clothes off with my teeth, throw you on the bed and give you a go-around like you've never had.
See more »

Soundtracks

Sixteen Tons
Written by Merle Travis (uncredited), also claimed by George S. Davis
Performed by Tennessee Ernie Ford
[Closing credits]
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User Reviews

 
Back to Mad Men
12 August 2016 | by borowiecsminusSee all my reviews

Ah, I almost forgot what Mad Men usually feels like. Relaxed and masterful. The previous episode was anything but, it was unusually dramatic and felt like a very different, but still good, show. This episode is more typical of Mad Men.

I think the writers knew that "Guy Walks" was not really what Mad Men is usually like, so they needed to slow things down in the next episode to give the viewers a chance to breathe. And, they really slowed things down.

This is a great episode, but think for a moment about what it's really about. There are three main plots. The first is the company trying to get Don to sign the contract. The second is Duck pursuing Peggy Olson. The final is Betty deciding what to do with her living room. That's right. The only one even close to exciting is Peggy's.

And yet, the episode still works. Sure, it's slow, even for Mad Men, but is skillful. It's precise. The writers and director really examined what they had to do, and you can tell they settled for nothing less that perfection. Now, if the show can apply this level of skill to a more interesting plot (rather than it being one or the other usually), then we'll have some real magnificent episodes on our hands.

It's not as good as the one before it, but that's one hell of a tough act to follow.


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