Columbo (1971) - News Poster

(1971–2003)

News

‘Wild Wild Country’: Mark Duplass and Filmmakers On Sheela’s Regrets, and If She’s a Psychopath — Turn It On Podcast

‘Wild Wild Country’: Mark Duplass and Filmmakers On Sheela’s Regrets, and If She’s a Psychopath — Turn It On Podcast
Mark Duplass admits that he can identify a bit with Ma Anand Sheela, the focus of Netflix’s buzzworthy docuseries “Wild Wild Country.”

The personal secretary to cult leader Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, Sheela didn’t initially come to Oregon in the early 1980s to cause trouble. But after her attempts to build Rajneeshpuram — a multi-million dollar utopia in a remote part of the state — were met with resistance, she went on the offensive.

For Duplass, who executive produced “Wild Wild Country,” Sheela’s resolve kind of reminds him of his early days in filmmaking.

“Sheela started with ideological love and excitement to build this community, which is very similar to how I came into independent cinema,” Duplass told IndieWire’s Turn It On podcast. “I just want to make my creative stuff and make it good. But then Sheela started to get threatened and she accidentally realized that she was
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘Spinning Man’

Film Review: ‘Spinning Man’
In an alternate universe, Guy Pearce plays sleazeheads, killers, cutthroats with attitude, and various other magnetically bent souls — in other words, just what he plays now — only he does it in movies that aren’t semi-off-the-radar hipster curios and genre throwaways. He does it with the stardom that “L.A. Confidential” and “Memento” promised. “Spinning Man” is one more halfway interesting, not-fully-realized-enough low-budget “dark” thriller that gives Pearce the chance to strut his chops. For a while, he’s quite good as a suave, confident weasel — a philosophy professor who becomes the chief suspect in the case of a high-school cheerleader who disappeared.

Did he make contact with her at the local lake, lure her into his car, do things that he shouldn’t have, and — in the end — kill her? It sure looks that way. “Spinning Man” loads up an accusatory pile of circumstantial evidence against its main character, making him seem guilty enough,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Emmys flashback: How Steven Bochco was ‘conned’ into thinking he would win for ‘Columbo’ [Watch]

Emmys flashback: How Steven Bochco was ‘conned’ into thinking he would win for ‘Columbo’ [Watch]
Long before he won 10 Emmys for three of the most iconic shows of all time, Steven Bochco, who died Sunday at 74 after a long battle with leukemia, received his first nomination for penning a 1971 episode of “Columbo” — and was “conned” into believing he would win.

Besides Bochco, “Murder by the Book,” the Season 1 premiere, boasted another burgeoning titan, Steven Spielberg, who directed it. The episode was up for Best Drama Writing in a three-nominee field against two other “Columbo” hours: “Suitable for Framing” by Jackson Gillis, and “Death Lends a Hand” by creators Richard Levinson and William Link. It was Levinson who kept reassuring Bochco that he would win, Bochco told the Archive of American Television in 2012.

See In Memoriam 2018: Remember the stars we lost this year

“He kept saying to me, ‘You’re going to win. Yours is the best one. Yours is the best, you’re going to win,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Steven Bochco: the cop show pioneer who paved the way for The Wire

With its swaggering, chaotic style, Bochco’s hit drama Hill Street Blues revolutionised TV and inspired a generation of showrunners

Steven Bochco, Hill Street Blues and NYPD Blue creator, dies at 74

Steven Bochco, who has died aged 74, enjoyed a career which spanned almost half a century of American TV drama. He began his working life at Universal Pictures in his mid-20s, working on such staple procedural fare as Ironside and McMillan & Wife, as well as writing the Columbo episode Murder by the Book in 1971 (directed by Steven Spielberg). His last major TV work was Murder in the First, which he wrote and executive produced between 2014 and 2016. This was cancelled – Bochco did not always have the Midas touch. Other flops included Bay City Blues, whose dismal ratings saw him lose his job at Mary Tyler Moore Enterprises, and the spectacularly bizarre Cop Rock, a police drama-cum-musical, a monument to ambition if nothing else,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Steven Bochco, 'Hill Street Blues,' 'NYPD Blue' Co-Creator, Dead at 74

Steven Bochco, 'Hill Street Blues,' 'NYPD Blue' Co-Creator, Dead at 74
Steven Bochco, the visionary television producer who co-created pioneering series like Hill Street Blues, NYPD Blue and L.A. Law, died Sunday following a long battle with leukemia. Bochco was 74.

"Steven fought cancer with strength, courage, grace and his unsurpassed sense of humor," Bochco's spokesman said in a statement. "He died peacefully in his sleep [at home] with his family close by."

Bochco, the winner of 10 Primetime Emmy Awards over the course of his groundbreaking career, started off in Hollywood as a screenwriter (The Twilight Zone, Colombo, the 1972 film Silent Running) before joining
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Steven Spielberg On His Friendship With Steven Bochco That Spanned 47 Years

It was 1971. Both Steven Spielberg and Steven Bochco were in their 20s, just starting out and yet to make their mark as icons of film and TV. Spielberg was largely an episodic director in television a few years away from his first blockbuster, Jaws. Future 10-time Emmy winner Bochco had co-created his first series, the 1969 NBC medical drama The Bold Ones: The New Doctors and had just landed a writing job on the hit NBC detective drama Columbo starring Peter Falk. The…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Appreciation: Steven Bochco Fought the Good Fight for Television

Appreciation: Steven Bochco Fought the Good Fight for Television
Steven Bochco was a true TV tough guy.

The producer behind such groundbreaking series as “Hill Street Blues,” “NYPD Blue,” and “L.A. Law” reveled in pushing boundaries and challenging the status quo. Behind the scenes, Bochco, who died Sunday at age 74, expertly leveraged his status as an A-list showrunner. In 1987 he commanded a still-unprecedented six-year, 10-series deal with ABC.

Bochco in his prime helped usher in the contemporary Golden Age of TV dramas by insisting that “NYPD Blue,” which ran from 1993 to 2005 on ABC, move the needle on the content restrictions that had traditionally defined broadcast TV. Bochco often used
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Entertainment Industry Remembers Steven Bochco: ‘He Changed Television Forever’

Entertainment Industry Remembers Steven Bochco: ‘He Changed Television Forever’
Innovative producer Steven Bochco died Sunday at the age of 74 after a long battle with leukemia. He was the creative force behind influential TV dramas like “Hill Street Blues,” “NYPD Blue,” and “L.A. Law.”

Longtime friends and colleagues such as Steven Spielberg hailed Bochco’s long run and legacy in the industry.

“Steve was a friend and a colleague starting with the first episode of ‘Columbo’ that he wrote and I directed,” Spielberg said in a statement. “We have supported and inspired each other ever since and through many deep mutual friendships we have stayed connected for 47 years. I will miss Steve terribly.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Steven Bochco, Innovative Co-Creator of ‘NYPD Blue,’ ‘Hill Street Blues,’ Dies at 74

Steven Bochco, Innovative Co-Creator of ‘NYPD Blue,’ ‘Hill Street Blues,’ Dies at 74
Steven Bochco, a producer whose boundary-pushing series such as “Hill Street Blues” and “NYPD Blue” helped define the modern TV drama, has died. He was 74.

Bochco had been battling a rare form of leukemia for several years. He had a transplant in late 2014 that was credited with prolonging his life. A family spokesman told the Associated Press that he died in his sleep on Sunday after a battle with cancer, but did not release details of a memorial service.

Working with different collaborators, Bochco co-created some of TV’s most popular series for more than 20 years while helping to create
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Why the New 'Roseanne' Reboot Just Plain Sucks

Let's be real for a second: The real Roseanne reboot had already happened long before this past Tuesday, and it was called Lady Bird. Darlene was now going to Catholic school; Aunt Jackie was playing the mom. But otherwise, Greta Gerwig's film had all the tropes that made the original Roseanne great: grit, compassion, family fireworks, blue-collar heart, feminist soul, a lovable lunk of a dad and Laurie Metcalf's sarcastic sneer. In other words, it had everything that's missing from ABC's new reboot version. Gerwig made a
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82
Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award winning film editor Edward Abroms died on Feb. 13 of heart failure in Thousand Oaks, Ca. He was 82.

He received an Academy Award nomination in 1983 with Frank Moriss for “Blue Thunder.” Abroms won Emmys for “My Sweet Charlie” in 1970 and for “Columbo” in 1972.

His TV credits include “Ironside,” “Murder She Wrote,” “Kojak,” “Police Story,” “CHiPs,” “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “Hawaii Five-o.”

Abroms worked with director Steven Spielberg on the pilot for “Night Gallery” in 1969 and on Spielberg’s first feature film “The Sugarland Express.” He was also an editor on “Jewel of the Nile.”

Abroms broke into the entertainment industry with a job at the mailroom at Republic Studios, then went to work at Technicolor where he met his wife Colleen. He began working as an apprentice at Review Productions to assistant editor and dialog editor on the series “Tarzan.”

In 1969 he teamed up with director Lamont Johnson on the television movie “Deadlock
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82

Oscar-Nominated Film Editor Edward Abroms Dies at 82
Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award winning film editor Edward Abroms died on Feb. 13 of heart failure in Thousand Oaks, Ca. He was 82.

He received an Academy Award nomination in 1983 with Frank Moriss for “Blue Thunder.” Abroms won Emmys for “My Sweet Charlie” in 1970 and for “Columbo” in 1972.

His TV credits include “Ironside,” “Murder She Wrote,” “Kojak,” “Police Story,” “CHiPs,” “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “Hawaii Five-o.”

Abroms worked with director Steven Spielberg on the pilot for “Night Gallery” in 1969 and on Spielberg’s first feature film “The Sugarland Express.” He was also an editor on “Jewel of the Nile.”

Abroms broke into the entertainment industry with a job at the mailroom at Republic Studios, then went to work at Technicolor where he met his wife Colleen. He began working as an apprentice at Review Productions to assistant editor and dialog editor on the series “Tarzan.”

In 1969 he teamed up with director Lamont Johnson on the television movie “Deadlock
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Edward Abroms, Steven Spielberg's First Film Editor, Dies at 82

Edward Abroms, the film editor who worked with a young Steven Spielberg on Night Gallery and The Sugarland Express and received an Oscar nomination for cutting John Badham's Blue Thunder, has died. He was 82.

Abroms died Tuesday of heart failure in Los Angeles, daughter Lynn Abroms told The Hollywood Reporter. He was the recipient of the American Cinema Editors' Career Achievement Award in 2006.

As a film editor and director on the long-running NBC hit Columbo, Abroms won the second of his two career Emmy Awards for cutting an episode in 1972. He landed a second nom that year...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Edward Abroms, Steven Spielberg's First Film Editor, Dies at 82

Edward Abroms, Steven Spielberg's First Film Editor, Dies at 82
Edward Abroms, the film editor who worked with a young Steven Spielberg on Night Gallery and The Sugarland Express and received an Oscar nomination for cutting John Badham's Blue Thunder, has died. He was 82.

Abroms died Tuesday of heart failure in Los Angeles, daughter Lynn Abroms told The Hollywood Reporter. He was the recipient of the American Cinema Editors' Career Achievement Award in 2006.

As a film editor and director on the long-running NBC hit Columbo, Abroms won the second of his two career Emmy Awards for cutting an episode in 1972. He landed a second nom that year...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

ADG Awards 2018: ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Coco,’ ‘Logan’ Take Production Design

ADG Awards 2018: ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Coco,’ ‘Logan’ Take Production Design
As expected, “Blade Runner 2049” and “The Shape of Water” were the big production design winners for fantasy and period at the 22nd Art Directors Guild Awards on Saturday at Hollywood and Highland. “Logan” was the surprising contemporary winner (production designed by Francois Audouy), but Pixar’s “Coco” made history as the Adg’s first animation honoree (earned by production designer Harley Jessup).

Production designers Dennis Gassner and Paul Austerberry will square off for the Oscar. Gassner, the favorite, created a harsh and brutalistic dystopia for Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner” sequel, while Austerberry’s brought noir and water motifs to Guillermo del Toro’s period fantasy-romance.

For TV, “Game of Thrones,” (period or fantasy), “The Handmaid’s Tale” (contemporary), “Black Mirror” (limited series), “Glow” (half-hour series), and “Will & Grace” (multi-camera series) were the big winners.

Adg honors went to Lucasfilm president and “Star Wars” franchise producer Kathleen Kennedy
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Columbo’ Architects Sue Universal Over Unpaid Profits From Detective Drama

Remember when episodes of Columbo would start with a cleverly planned and, er, executed killing in which the perp took great pains in trying to throw the cops off his trail? Well, the creators of that iconic NBC crime drama starring Peter Falk are suing Universal over what they claim is not deliberate elusiveness but merely choosing not to pay them what was owed. In a 15-page complaint filed today in Los Angeles Superior Court through their loanout companies (read it <a href="https://pmcdeadline2.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/columbo-complaint-wm.pdf" target="_blank"…
See full article at Deadline TV »

'Columbo' Creators Sue Universal Over Profits from 1970s Show

Columbo may no longer be on network television, but there's another case to solve, thanks to a lawsuit filed Tuesday against Universal City Studios.

Suing through loan-out companies, Columbo producers William Link and the heirs of Richard Levinson (who died in 1987) allege being shortchanged on profits from the detective series that starred Peter Falk and aired on NBC in the 1970s.

"The television studios are notoriously greedy," states a complaint lodged in Los Angeles Superior Court. "This case involves outright and obviously intentional dishonesty perpetrated against two iconic talents. Here, Universal decided it just wasn't going to account to Plaintiffs...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Canon Of Film: ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ (1974)

In this week’s edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look Sidney Lumet‘s hypnotic ‘Murder on the Orient Express‘ just in time for the release of Kenneth Branagh‘s remake of the same name. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Murder On The Orient Express (1974)

Director: Sidney Lumet

Screenplay: Paul Dehn based on the novel by Agatha Christie (uncredited)

Strangely, the detective story is actually a fairly newer genre when compared to others, in terms of literary history, it is, and the inventor of the genre is not who you’d think it’d be either, it was Edgar Allen Poe, with his trilogy of C. Auguste Dupin stories, ‘The Murder of the Rue Morgue‘, ‘The Mystery of Marie Roget,’ and my favorite, ‘The Purloined Letter‘ back in the 1840s. I’m not sure why this genre didn’t pick up until then,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary

10 Things We Learned From HBO's 'Spielberg' Documentary
Susan Lacy's documentary Spielberg debuts October 7th on HBO, trots out an all-star team of interviewees – from film critics to famous friends, the Toms (Cruise and Hanks) to God herself, a.k.a. Oprah Winfrey. The voices film buffs will undoubtedly want to hear from the most, however, belong to his fellow "movie brats": Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, George Lucas and Martin Scorsese, who all talk at length about their heady New Hollywood days alongside Spielberg in the early Seventies. All of them partied together, bounced
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Pyx (1973)

  • DailyDead
Redemption can be a hard ticket to punch, in real life let alone on film. An arc has to be convincing in a short space of time and make us believe our protagonist’s journey. Thanks to a brilliant performance by Karen Black and a meticulously unfurled plot, The Pyx (1973) offers sorrow and resolution in a gripping package.

Released in September by Cinepix Film Properties in our home and native land, Canada, and by Cinerama Releasing Corporation in the States the following month, The Pyx used Canadian shelter funds not to tell an exploitive tale, but rather a somber character study dressed up as a neo-noir with an occult twist. Not an easy sell to be sure, but does it really matter? At the end of the day, The Pyx is another noble attempt to infuse the genre with unusual strands regardless of the box office receipts. (I mean, my
See full article at DailyDead »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

External Sites