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Emmys 2018: The Good, The Bad & The Proposal

Emmys 2018: The Good, The Bad & The Proposal
This year’s 70th Primetime Emmy Awards ceremony, presided over by Saturday Night Live‘s ‘Weekend Update” anchors Colin Jost and Michael Che, set out to celebrate the most diverse list of nominees in Emmy history, opening with the production number “We Solved It”:

We solved it

We got with the times

There’s room for all our voices

but mostly Shonda Rhimes’.

Some of the ceremony’s participants did not get that memo, and went memorably off-point:

Best Marriage Proposal

Glenn Weiss, winning the Emmy for Best Director of a Variety Special for his work on the Oscars, upstaged the diversity celebration when he thanked his girlfriend for her support, adding, “You wonder why I don’t like to call you my girlfriend? Because I want to call you my wife.” As Emmy-goers erupted, the camera swung to Jan Svendsen, who blew her cue, saying “yes” though, as Weiss stage-directed her,
See full article at Deadline »

Robert Redford would make Oscar history with win for ‘The Old Man and the Gun’

Robert Redford would make Oscar history with win for ‘The Old Man and the Gun’
Robert Redford has recently announced that his appearance in the upcoming film “The Old Man and the Gun” will mark his retirement from acting. Since then, this Hollywood icon has been rising up the ranks on our Oscars prediction chart for Best Actor. Should he take home the Academy Award next February, Redford would, at age 82, become the oldest-ever winner of that race.

His new movie is based on the true story of an elderly ex-con who robs a number of banks and becomes a folk hero. The role makes a fitting bookend to a career that was launched into the stratosphere by “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” fifty years ago. This new film by David Lowery boasts an exceptional supporting cast including Oscar winners Sissy Spacek, Casey Affleck and Keith Carradine as well as Emmy champ Elisabeth Moss and screen veteran Danny Glover.

Redford lost his only bid
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmy speeches 2018: The evening’s best (and worst) acceptance speeches included Glenn Weiss, Alex Borstein …

Emmy speeches 2018: The evening’s best (and worst) acceptance speeches included Glenn Weiss, Alex Borstein …
The 2018 Emmy Awards honored a plethora of the season’s best television programs. And the ceremony itself did not disappoint when it came to memorable acceptance speeches. Some were poignant and inspiring, while others went for gut-busting laughs. There were also, however, the occasional speeches that didn’t quite hit the mark. With the ceremony now behind us, let’s take a look back at a handful of the best and worst acceptance speeches from the 2018 Emmys. And check out the complete list of winners here.

SEEEmmy winners 2018: Full list of winners and nominees at the 70th Emmy Awards The Best:

Movie/Mini Actress: Regina King (“Seven Seconds”)

King was visibly shocked, as were presenters Leslie Jones and RuPaul, when she pulled off one of the evening’s biggest upsets for her portrayal of grieving mother Latrice Butler on “Seven Seconds,” a series which, despite critical acclaim, was cancelled by Netflix after one season.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Amazon’s ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Dominates Comedy Field at Emmys

  • Variety
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” got off to a marvelous start Monday at the 70th annual Primetime Emmy Awards.

The Amazon series dominated the comedy categories, which were stacked at the top of the show. Rachel Brosnahan won the award for best actress in a comedy series, following up on her win in the same category at the Golden Globe Awards earlier this year. “Maisel,” Brosnahan said, is “about a woman finding her voice anew.” She then struck a political note, adding, “One of the ways that we can find our voices is to vote,” urging viewers to register.

Brosnahan’s win followed back-to-back victories for series creator Amy Sherman-Palladino, for best writing in a comedy series, then for best directing in a comedy series. When she picked up the latter award, Sherman-Palladino was still clutching her writing Emmy. Alex Borstein won for best comedy supporting actress, the first win of the night for “Maisel.
See full article at Variety »

The Coen Brothers Head Out West With ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Trailer

With True Grit, The Coen Brothers proved that the Western genre was an absolute fit, and Western tinged flicks like O Brother, Where Art Thou? and No Country For Old Men cements that very fact. With The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, however, the filmmakers traverse new territory in the streaming world, as this flick will make [...]

The post The Coen Brothers Head Out West With ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Trailer appeared first on Hollywood Outbreak.
See full article at Hollywood Outbreak »

‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Trailer: Coen Brothers Bring Their Venice-Winning Western to Netflix

‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Trailer: Coen Brothers Bring Their Venice-Winning Western to Netflix
Joel and Ethan Coen have had tremendous success in the western genre over the last several years. Their 2007 neo-western “No Country for Old Men” won them the Oscars for best picture, best director, and best adapted screenplay, while the more traditional “True Grit” earned an impressive 10 Oscar nominations in 2011, including best picture. The brothers are returning to the genre, albeit with an anthology twist, for the upcoming “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.”

Originally announced a limited television series, “Buster Scruggs” was revealed to be a feature film when it was confirmed as an official competition entry for the 2018 Venice Film Festival. The Western tells six different stories and features an ensemble cast that includes “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” star Tim Blake Nelson, Zoe Kazan, James Franco, Liam Neeson, and Tom Waits.

Unlike the Coen brothers’ other Western films, “Buster Scruggs” is not shot by cinematographer Roger Deakins. The filmmakers
See full article at Indiewire »

eOne Names Dora Candelaria To Head Global Film Marketing

  • Deadline
Exclusive: Entertainment One has hired Dora Candelaria to lead its global film marketing. The former Paramount executive is joining as Evp, Marketing, Film and will oversee marketing and publicity of all eOne film content, working closely with the company’s senior leadership, key film partners and local territories to create and implement global strategy and initiatives. She’ll be based in La.

Candelaria was previously at Paramount Pictures where she held various roles since 2007, most recently as Svp of International Publicity. During her tenure at the studio, she led overseas campaigns for recent smashes Mission: Impossible- Fallout and A Quiet Place. She also worked across the Mission, Transformers and Star Trek franchises and on comedies Daddy’s Home 1 & 2, thriller Jack Reacher and Oscar winner The Big Short. Domestically, Candelaria executed publicity campaigns for films such as the first two Iron Man movies the Paranormal Activity franchise, True Grit and Justin Bieber: Never Say Never.
See full article at Deadline »

The Western Gallops Into Oscar Season With ‘Sisters Brothers’ and ‘Buster Scruggs’

  • Variety
The Western Gallops Into Oscar Season With ‘Sisters Brothers’ and ‘Buster Scruggs’
The western remains, thankfully, alive and well, and two films dropping at the Venice Film Festival this week remind us there is still plenty to explore in the genre.

In Jacques Audiard’s “The Sisters Brothers,” actor John C. Reilly — who developed the project with his wife — offers one of his finest portrayals opposite Joaquin Phoenix as one half of a bounty-hunting duo. It’s a performance reflective of the movie itself, one of both hard-bitten toughness and unexpected tenderness.

In a recent interview with Variety, Reilly said he didn’t want a cliched or romanticized version of the west or mythic anti-heroes of that realm. He wanted to reflect the reality, particularly the multi-cultural one. “There were Chinese people and French people and Hungarians and Russians and all these people coming from all over the world in this mad search for opportunity or a freer life,” he said, also
See full article at Variety »

Venice Review: ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Isn’t Classic Coen Brothers, Still a Fine Western Anthology

Eyebrows were raised when the venerable contributors of Sight & Sound named Twin Peaks: The Return the second-best “film” of 2017 despite the fact that only a niche selection of theaters had offered to screen it in its near 18-hour entirety. We can rest assured there will be significantly less fussing about what exactly to call The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, a project that began life as a six-part anthology series at Netflix and is now being presented as that rarest of beasts: a feature-length portmanteau.

Scruggs is, of course, the latest work from brothers Joel and Ethan Coen, and represents a ravishing if wildly uneven addition to their catalogue. It also marks their first foray into the odd waters of the portmanteau subgenre, which is perhaps a little surprising when considering the duo’s dexterity with so many cinematic modes, not to mention their signature ability to switch between such a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Venice 2018: Parables to Contemplate in 'The Ballad of Buster Scruggs'

Gather 'round everyone, take a seat by the fire, for Joel & Ethan Coen have some fun new tales to tell. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs is a six-part Western anthology film, the latest feature from the Coen Brothers. They've made Westerns before (most notably True Grit in 2010) but this is something else entirely - six different stories, each with their own unique characters, and locations, and ideas to consider. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs is as intelligent, contemplative, comedic, and as beautiful as everything from the Coens, but it goes beyond that. These six stories are actually parables about humanity and the way people cheat, lie, deceive each other, and the way men are greedy, confused, ambitious, unsure, and careless. And they're all gorgeously filmed, captivating to watch, which is no surprise considering the Coens are filmmaking masters. Originally intended to be a mini-series for Netflix, the Coen Brothers' The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Review: Coen Brothers’ Netflix Anthology Western Is a Messy Collage of Their Best Motifs

‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Review: Coen Brothers’ Netflix Anthology Western Is a Messy Collage of Their Best Motifs
The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” is bookended by two of the strangest vignettes of Joel and Ethan Coen’s careers; beyond that, it’s a bit of a crapshoot. The sibling directors’ Netflix-produced Western anthology, initially reported as a miniseries before landing on the fall calendar as a feature, feels like it’s stuck somewhere in between the two. It amounts to an intermittently funny, gorgeous, and patience-trying 130 minutes, but fans will find plenty of gems in this messy assemblage of Coen brothers motifs.

The Coens have channeled Western tropes across their decades-spanning careers, and “Buster Scruggs” plays a bit like liner notes. While they’ve only engaged the genre directly with “True Grit” and “No Country for Old Men,” aspects of Western swagger percolate all the way back to “Blood Simple” — the harsh desert milieu, sweet harmonies juxtaposed with the merciless terrain, American dreams gone sour, and obsessive
See full article at Indiewire »

'The Ballad of Buster Scruggs': Film Review | Venice 2018

'The Ballad of Buster Scruggs': Film Review | Venice 2018
Part sincere and part smarmy, part amusing and part windy nonsense, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs plays like an old Western-themed vaudeville show featuring six unrelated sketches of drastically differing quality. In other words, this little Western anthology is minor Coen brothers, worth checking out on Netflix, which backed it, but of very limited potential theatrically.

The Coens decisively proved themselves as devotees of Western lore past in True Grit and present in No Country for Old Men, and their keenness for the genre comes through palpably in the music, language, storytelling tropes and settings they’ve chosen for this diversion....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Oscar season is set to launch with Venice film festival opener ‘First Man’

Oscar season is set to launch with Venice film festival opener ‘First Man’
It’s official. Oscar season is about to commence with the start of the 75th annual Venice International Film Festival, which runs through Sept. 8.

This celebration of world cinema blasts off with the premiere of Damien Chazelle’s biopic “First Man,” which stars Ryan Gosling as the first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong. The director’s “La La Land” also claimed the coveted opening-night spot in 2016 and went on to win six Academy Awards, including Best Director and lead actress for Emma Stone. Other recent Venice entries that went on to awards glory include 2013’s “Gravity,”2015’s “Birdman” and last year’s Oscar choice for Best Picture, “The Shape of Water.”

Gravity’s” Alfonso Cuaron is back with “Roma,” an intimate remembrance of his childhood in 1970s Mexico. It is his first non-English film since his breakout with 2001’s “Y Tu Mama Tambien” with visual wow factor of “Gravity.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘A Star Is Born’ Again and Again and Again – Will the Movie Remakes Ever Stop? (Guest Blog)

  • The Wrap
‘A Star Is Born’ Again and Again and Again – Will the Movie Remakes Ever Stop? (Guest Blog)
The Venice Film Festival begins August 29 and possibly the most anticipated American entry is the world premiere of “A Star Is Born” starring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper, who also directed the film. This is at least the fourth telling of this tale. The stars change, the style of music changes, but the story apparently has something that is evergreen — the title, coincidentally, of Barbra Streisand’s Oscar-winning song in the 1976 version.

The latest big-screen reboot of “Charlie’s Angels” was announced earlier this summer, and as we speak, Steven Spielberg and Tony Kushner are prepping a reimagining of “West Side Story.” It might make sense to attempt a new take on a great idea that didn’t work the first time. (The Rat Pack’s “Oceans 11” became the much better George Clooney version.) But for an iconic musical that won 10 Oscars?

The list of failed remakes is long. Another winner of ten-plus Oscars,
See full article at The Wrap »

11 Movies That Could Have Won a Best Popular Film Oscar

  • Variety
11 Movies That Could Have Won a Best Popular Film Oscar
Nearly a decade ago, the controversial best-picture snub of superhero hit “The Dark Knight” sparked the motion picture Academy to action. In an attempt to stoke the Oscar odds for populist cinema and to be more inclusive, the organization expanded its top field for the first time in seven decades.

Last week, with Oscar telecast ratings trending downward at an alarming rate for ABC executives, Academy brass took action once again, announcing a half-baked plan to honor “popular” films with an Oscar in some manner to be adjudicated at a later date.

The thinking is that declining interest in the Oscar telecast is owed in part to under-seen art-house fare boxing out popular films at the ceremony year after year. Nevertheless, an analysis of the last nine years of nominees — the post-“Dark Knight” world, if you will — reveals a healthy balance of specialty fare and movies the masses flocked to see.
See full article at Variety »

With ‘Mission: Impossible – Fallout,’ the Tom Cruise Franchise Could Be Bigger than James Bond in North America

With ‘Mission: Impossible – Fallout,’ the Tom Cruise Franchise Could Be Bigger than James Bond in North America
Well before “Star Wars” or “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” and much earlier than “Jurassic Park” or the comic-book universes, the Bond films invented franchise filmmaking. Still, as solid as 007 remains, “M:i” may be its equal in North America. “Mission: Impossible – Fallout” could be the final summer release to open to $75 million or more. That’s a bit over pre-release projections, but its reviews are the best of any studio release this summer — nearly as good as “Black Panther” earlier this year.

Lower estimates are based on the $62 million debut for “Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation” the same weekend three years ago. Paramount itself is low-balling expectations with a $50 million prediction, which can safely be ignored. That $65 million consensus is likely low, but perhaps more extraordinary is that Tom Cruise’s 22-year-old spy-thriller franchise may have more box-office clout than James Bond.

That may seem like heresy. The Bond films launched
See full article at Indiewire »

The Coen Brothers Crash Oscar Season: ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Confirmed as a Movie and Ready for the Fall

The Coen Brothers Crash Oscar Season: ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Confirmed as a Movie and Ready for the Fall
The Coen Brothers have officially thrown their cowboy hats into the Oscar ring. The 2018 Venice Film Festival lineup announcement brought many exciting world premieres, from Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma” to Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Favourite,” but no competition entry was as surprising as Joel and Ethan Coen’s “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.” The brothers’ Western anthology film will debut at Venice and be released by Netflix later this year.

The big news here is that “Buster Scruggs” is confirmed as a movie. The project was first announced in January 2017 as a “limited series” developed through Annapurna’s TV division. In a press release, Annapurna said it was mulling “an innovative television and theatrical integrated approach” for the distribution of “Buster Scruggs.” Netflix boarded the project in April 2017, with the Coen brothers marking the pickup by claiming, “We are streaming motherfuckers!”

“Buster Scruggs” was originally reported to feature six standalone episodes,
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter Bart: From Bats To Bugs, Superheroes Find A Way To Stretch Spandex Franchises

Peter Bart: From Bats To Bugs, Superheroes Find A Way To Stretch Spandex Franchises
The new Ant-Man epic is a big hit, again raising the question what is the box office magic embedded in Marvel’s superhero (or super-insect) movies? How long will it sustain?

The “magic” is a relatively new phenomenon: Thirty years ago this summer, in fact, Peter Guber ran into a brick wall trying to persuade Warner Bros to finance a superhero movie. The creative types at the studio didn’t buy either the genre or the title – Batman. Not ones to be rebuffed, Guber and his then-partner Jon Peters went to work on the studio’s merchandising and foreign sales teams to rally support.

Not only did the movie ultimately get made (Tim Burton directed), but superhero movies have held the keys to the kingdom ever since — Ant-Man and the Wasp is Marvel’s 20th. Seven of last year’s 11 top-grossing movies were proud (?) representatives of this genre. “Hollywood’s
See full article at Deadline »

Review: "More Dead Than Alive" (1969) Starring Clint Walker And Vincent Price; Kino Lorber Blu-ray

  • CinemaRetro
By Fred Blosser

Kino Lorber has released the obscure 1969 Western “More Dead Than Alive” in a Blu-ray edition. Discharged from prison in 1891 after serving an eighteen-year sentence for murder, legendary gunslinger Cain (Clint Walker) determines to stay away from firearms, find honest work, and save enough money to buy a ranch. But his reputation as “Killer” Cain precedes him, and chances for employment are slim until he encounters conniving showman Dan Ruffalo (Vincent Price). “People would have something to talk about, if they could see you using this notched Colt of yours,” Ruffalo chortles. He encourages Cain to cash in on his notoriety and join Ruffalo’s traveling show as its star sharpshooting attraction, relegating the show’s current marksman, Billy (Paul Hampton), to a subsidiary role. Monica, a free-spirited artist (Anne Francis), strikes up a friendship with Cain and thinks it’s a bad idea for him to pick up a gun again,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

J.K. Simmons On Playing Two Identical Leads In ‘Counterpart’; Women Will Dominate In Season 2

  • Deadline
J.K. Simmons On Playing Two Identical Leads In ‘Counterpart’; Women Will Dominate In Season 2
One of the most prolific actors of our time, J.K. Simmons never seems to slow down, with a resume far too long to list here, but which includes everything from Juno to La La Land, to The Closer, True Grit, Justice League, and an Oscar and Globe-winning turn in Whiplash. His latest incarnation in Starz’s Counterpart sees him take on not one, but two roles: Howard Silk and Howard Prime–two spies living on opposite sides of a parallel dimension.

“The Howards” may be identical in appearance, but are very different in character, at least at first. When we meet protagonist Howard Silk, he is meekly going about the mysterious cubicle-bound United Nations job about which he has asked no questions for some 25 years. Then comes Howard Prime, his literal counterpart, and the product of a different reality. When they find each other, the duo has almost opposite personalities,
See full article at Deadline »
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