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Fabian: Going to the Dogs ()

Fabian oder Der Gang vor die Hunde (original title)
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1930s Berlin. Dr. Jakob Fabian, who works by day in advertising for a cigarette company and by night wanders the streets of the city, falls in love with an actress. As her career begins to blossom, prospects for his future begin to wane.

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Cast

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Jakob Fabian
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Stephan Labude
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Cornelia Battenberg
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Justizrat Labude
Petra Kalkutschke ...
Frau Fabian
Elmar Gutmann ...
Herr Fabian
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Produzent Makart
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Baroness Ruth Reiter
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Irene Moll
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Frau Hohlfeld
Julia Preuß ...
Kyra
Lukas Rüppel ...
Weckherlin
Michael Hanemann ...
Professor
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Direktor Breitkopf
Jörg-Uwe Schröder ...
Dr. Moll (as Jörg Uwe Schröder)
Brian Völkner ...
Kollege Fischer
Thomas Dehler ...
Kriminalkommissar Donath
Luise Aschenbrenner ...
Die Kulp
Lena Baader ...
Die Selow
Julia Blankenburg ...
Buchhalterin
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Olga
Joachim Nimtz ...
Erzähler (voice)
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Erzählerin (voice)
Sönke Möhring ...
Einarmiger
Sascha Maaz ...
Caligula
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Kriminalassistent
Catalina Navarro Kirner ...
Sekretärin Menasse
Axel Werner ...
Wilhelmy
Chris Eckert ...
Kellner
Dominik Hermanns ...
Der Gezeichnete
Andreas Preiß ...
Mann im Café
Doreen Pohl ...
Frau im Café
Jochen Lebelt ...
Herr Tröger
Lucas Lentes ...
Gaston
Natascha Merckens ...
Schauspielerin Probeaufnahmen
Gert Kniepers ...
Doktor im Klublokal Cousine
Caroline Adam Bay ...
Dramatische Sängerin
Gesine Hummel ...
Junge Frau bei Fabian 1
Alexandra Liebich ...
Junge Frau bei Fabian 2
Olaf Normann ...
Chauffeur Cornelia
Seçkin Yüce ...
Kellner im Restaurant
Alina Jeschkowski ...
Leda
Gregor Chmieleski ...
Institutsdiener
Thomas Reimann ...
Bettler
Fidan Aghayeva-Edler ...
Pianistin Kabarett
Florian Steffens ...
Begleiter von Kyra
Yvonne Grünwald ...
Akkordeonistin Kusine
Marina Grezinger ...
Wirtin im Institut
Matthias Klaus ...
Hausdiener
Florian Gebauer ...
Paul Müller
René Barra ...
Engelmann
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lisa Hoffmann ...
Hüpf-Elschen
Kris Kwiat ...
Reichswehrsoldat
Hossein Rahmani Manesh
Masoud Tosifyan

Directed by

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Dominik Graf

Written by

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Erich Kästner ... (novel)
 
Constantin Lieb ... (screenplay) &
Dominik Graf ... (screenplay)

Produced by

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Wiebke Andresen ... co-producer
Christoph Daniel ... co-producer
Christoph Fisser ... associate producer
Gerda Leopold ... associate producer
Christine Rau ... line producer
Marc Schmidheiny ... co-producer
Felix von Boehm ... producer

Music by

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Sven Rossenbach
Florian van Volxem

Cinematography by

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Hanno Lentz

Film Editing by

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Claudia Wolscht

Editorial Department

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Andreas Lautil ... colorist

Casting By

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An Dorthe Braker

Production Design by

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Claus-Jürgen Pfeiffer

Costume Design by

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Barbara Grupp

Makeup Department

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Anna Freund ... makeup artist
Nanni Gebhardt-Seele ... makeup artist
Stephanie Hanf ... additional makeup & hair artist

Production Management

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Günter Fenner ... production manager
Eike Wolf ... studio manager: Studio Babelsberg

Second Unit Director or Assistant Director

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Petra Misovic ... assistant director

Art Department

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Nadja Götze ... set dresser
Felicitas Püls ... graphic designer

Sound Department

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Martina Bahr ... sound designer
Florian Neunhoeffer ... sound designer
Andreas Schneider ... foley artist
Michael Stecher ... re-recording mixer
Martin Witte ... sound
Bastian Zeiselmair ... sound editor

Stunts

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Billy Buff ... stunt performer: student
Markus Pütterich ... stunt coordinator

Music Department

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Richie Beirach ... composer: piano

Script and Continuity Department

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Norbert Maass ... script consultant

Transportation Department

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Hagen Rohling ... production driver

Production Companies

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Distributors

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Special Effects

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Other Companies

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Storyline

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Plot Summary

Berlin, 1931. A milieu between sublets and the underworld, where brothels are artists' studios, Nazis are yelling abuse in the streets and Babelsberg is dreaming of producing "psychological cinema". Life is surging, society is fermenting and corroding. As long as he still has a job, Jakob Fabian, who has a doctorate in German studies, writes advertising copy during the day and frequents the city's more outlandish establishments with Stephan Labude at night. While his friend - who later confesses to having failed "in the subjects of life and profession" - is a go-getter when it comes to communism and sex, Fabian remains sober and distant. Without really believing in it, he is waiting for the "victory of decency". His love for Cornelia is the only thing that makes him question his ironic fatalism. She becomes a ray of hope in his crumbling existence. Written by jakkepoes

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Additional Details

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Also Known As
  • Fabian - Der Gang vor die Hunde (Germany)
  • Fabian: Going to the Dogs (World-wide, English title)
  • Fabian: Going to the Dogs (Canada, English title)
  • Fabian: Going to the Dogs (United States)
  • Fabian: Going to the Dogs (Singapore, English title)
  • See more »
Runtime
  • 176 min
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Did You Know?

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Trivia The movie's full title "Fabian - Going to the dogs" is actually the title that Erich Kästner wanted to call the novel originally. However the publisher's rejected it so it was changed to "Fabian - The story of a moralist" See more »
Goofs When being in Labude's garden the meadow is watered by an impact sprinkler. It was first invented in 1933 in California, while the scene is set in Germany in 1931. See more »
Movie Connections Edited from Die Stadt der Millionen (1925). See more »
Crazy Credits During the closing credits the names and tasks of cast and crew keep switching based on the position of the credits. If the credits are right-adjusted, then first the name and then the job/role appears. If left-adjusted, then it is the other way around. See more »
Quotes Producer Makart: A appendix is like a socialist. You know why? Because it is better without him.
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