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Four Lions (2010)

R | | Comedy, Crime, Drama | 7 May 2010 (UK)
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ON DISC
Four incompetent British terrorists set out to train for and commit an act of terror.

Director:

(as Chris Morris)

Writers:

(as Chris Morris), | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
3,723 ( 731)
Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 8 wins & 23 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Omar
... Hassan
... Barry
... Waj
... Faisal
... Alice
... Matt
... Sofia
Wasim Zakir ... Ahmed
Mohamad Akil ... Mahmood (as Mohammad Aqil)
Karl Seth ... Uncle Imran
... Khalid (as Willliam El-Gardi)
... Malcolm Storge MP (as Alex MacQueen)
Shameem Ahmad ... Chairwoman
Jonathan Maitland ... Newsreader (as Jonny Maitland)
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Storyline

Four Lions tells the story of a group of British jihadists who push their abstract dreams of glory to the breaking point. As the wheels fly off, and their competing ideologies clash, what emerges is an emotionally engaging (and entirely plausible) farce. In a storm of razor-sharp verbal jousting and large-scale set pieces, Four Lions is a comic tour de force; it shows that-while terrorism is about ideology-it can also be about idiots. Written by Sundance Film Festival

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language throughout, including some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

|

Language:

| |

Release Date:

7 May 2010 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Quatro Leões  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£608,608 (United Kingdom), 9 May 2010, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$41,512, 7 November 2010, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$304,137, 18 February 2011
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

, ,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film had its world premiere at Sundance on January 23rd, 2010. The same day, the UK "terror threat" level was raised to "severe" due to non-specific "chatter". See more »

Goofs

Omar is walking through the park and meets his brother Ahmed playing football in the rain. Ahmed's umbrella goes from small to big for a close-up, then back to small again. See more »

Quotes

Hassan: I'm a martyr, you're all squashed tomatoes.
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Crazy Credits

One sheep was blown up in the making of this film See more »

Connections

References Lassie (1954) See more »

Soundtracks

Symphony No. 9 in E Minor, OP 95 'From The New World'
By Antonín Dvorák
Performed by Berliner Philharmoniker
Conducted by Herbert von Karajan
Courtesy of Deutsche Grammophone Gmbh under license from Universal Music Group
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User Reviews

 
More than a meow
11 May 2010 | by See all my reviews

With The Day Today and its more acerbic follow-up Brasseye, supreme satirist Chris Morris made a mockery of the madness of the popular media by saying what he saw. It was funny because it could have been true. With Four Lions, Morris's focus is no longer on the manipulator, but rather the manipulated. Yet by presenting this jihad suicide squad as a group of bumbling misfits, chugging along the road to apotheosis in a car fitted with dodgy "Jewish spark plugs", it's still about the madness – here, the madness of a cracked ideology believed in mostly because it's made up as it goes along.

This is not really a film about Islam, or even religious fundamentalism, but identity. Omar (an excellent Riz Ahmed) speaks fluently about the "Church of McDonald's" and Western imperialism, and yet he's at the centre of a comfortable, suburban, upper working class family unit. Hassan (Arsher Ali) is an awkward, gangly virgin with a bone to pick with his Media Studies teacher. Barry (Nigel Lindsay, who some might remember playing a terrorist of a different creed in HBO's Rome) is white.

For all their misadventures, there's a genuine tenderness and loyalty between these "soldiers". This is a side of Morris we've rarely seen before – an emotional spine that raises the film far above what could have resembled a series of sketches or, worse, a reel of better outtakes. Perhaps this is the film's greatest success: bringing its director out of the satirical shadows and into the comedy spotlight, and proving there's a heart to go with that clever head.


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