Moving On (2009) - News Poster

(2009– )

News

BBC sitcom pilot Fishbowl hits iPlayer on Monday: Like finding a bottle of chips in your driveway

BBC Three is moving exclusively online in the not-too-distant future, but in truth the channel has been edging that way for some time.

Now in its fourth year, BBC Comedy Feeds has served up regular batches of pilots on the web to give exposure to new talent, with several shows eventually being picked up as full BBC Three series.

First screened at the BBC Salford Sitcom Showcase 2015 in May, Fishbowl is launched on BBC iPlayer this Monday (July 13).

It's been described by its creators as "a warm-hearted comedy about the suffocating joy of hanging out with your parents in a lovely little town where escape is impossible and there's usually chips for tea".

Fishbowl stars Katherine Rose Morley as Hattie, a girl who is forced to return home to mum and dad after an eventful first term at university.

"I absolutely loved playing Hattie. She is fierce, outspoken, yet she
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

What next for Saturday night UK family drama?

From Primeval to Merlin and Atlantis, Doctor Who's return spawned a host of Saturday teatime dramas that have since disappeared. What next?

It’s Saturday night. BBC 1 is showing Doctor Who. It does this a lot, generally speaking, and has done on and off (sometimes very off) for over fifty years. When the show returned in 2005 it brought with it the realisation that there was a huge family audience un-catered for on Saturday nights, and unfortunately Doctor Who was only on air for a quarter of the year, so it couldn’t do it all by itself.

ITV quickly realised it needed to attract that audience too, and while it had gameshows that dominated the schedules it didn’t have anything like Buck Rogers In The 25th Century or The A Team to put up against the BBC this time. And time was of the essence: new shows had
See full article at Den of Geek »

Len Goodman, Shane Richie: Find out what's coming up for BBC Daytime

BBC Daytime has announced its new line-up, featuring programmes from stars such as Len Goodman, Margaret Mountford and Shane Richie.

Unveiling a variety of shows from a number of different genres, BBC Daytime controller Damian Cavanagh praised the "rich mix of brand new programming".

Drama

New drama The Coroner - which follows a solicitor returning to her seaside hometown to work as the coroner after a messy marriage break-up - will join returning shows Father Brown and Wpc 56, which are both back for their third series.

Moving On, the acclaimed Jimmy McGovern drama, is back for a sixth series with new stars such as Hayley Mills, Lisa Riley and Peter Egan. Doctors also promises the arrival of a new nurse, goodbyes to familiar faces, a Halloween ghost story and a Christmas wedding.

Factual

Celebrity chef James Martin will head a campaign to bring communities together with his new show Meet The Street,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Jimmy McGovern tackles Australia's dark past

A seven-part series set during the turbulent period of the establishment of the penal colony in Sydney in 1788 may seem a stretch for Liverpool-born and based writer Jimmy McGovern.

Yet Banished, which starts shooting in Sydney on Monday, deals with themes the writer has often explored in the UK series he's created in a distinguished 30- year career.

.Jimmy.s stories are about the moral complexities which human beings face when they are in difficult situations,. his producing partner Sita Williams tells If. .He asks the audience: .What would you have done in that situation? Would you have done it any differently?..

David Wenham heads the large Australian/British cast as Governor Arthur Phillip, a pragmatic idealist who hopes to turn the penal colony into a land of opportunity for all. Joseph Milson portrays his nemesis Major Ross, who believes the only chance of survival is to rule with an iron fist.
See full article at IF.com.au »

TV highlights 11/11/2013

  • The Guardian - TV News
Moving On | Junior Bake Off | Bear Grylls: Escape From Hell | Fresh Meat | Under The Dome | Storyville: Hotel Folly: Folie A Deux | The Shooting Gallery

Moving On

2.15pm, BBC1

Jimmy McGovern's week of stand-alone dramas kicks off with Strictly Come Dancing supremo Natalie Gumede in a modern-day parable about a frustrated stay-at-home mum. Gumede plays Jo, a policeman's wife so bored by her life of ironing and gazing longingly at the lives of besuited school mums that she shoplifts for thrills. Sharon Horgan, Craig Kelly and Amy Nuttall are among the familiar faces lined up for the series, a real daytime treat full of strong characters and subtle twists. Hannah Verdier

Junior Bake Off

4.30pm, Cbbc

While the tent's still up, another bus-load of bakers – tiny ones – arrive to perform floury stunts for Mary Berry and James Martin (replacing Paul Hollywood), egged on by an emphatic man in a floral shirt.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Daytime TV viewers deserve decent drama too, says Sanjeev Bhaskar

The Kumars star on dramas, budgets and the fight to have all facets of British culture portrayed on TV

Daytime television is generally regarded as cheap, schedule-filling fodder for housewives and the retired, but with the schedules facing cuts, actor Sanjeev Bhaskar has spoken up in its defence.

Earlier this year BBC2 daytime shows were axed and replaced with repeats and news in a bid to save money in the face of a licence fee freeze. But Bhaskar, who stars in the award-winning daytime BBC1 series The Indian Doctor, has argued that daytime television can and should be challenging. "Good quality drama is not just the preserve of the evenings," he said. "Traditionally, daytime shows were associated with cooking shows, bargain shows, Diy, etc – it was seen as the realm of the housewife at home or the retired person, that kind of stuff."

He said shows such as Jimmy McGovern
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BBC announces 'Moving On' as first drama to premiere on iPlayer

BBC One has announced a new series of Jimmy McGovern's Moving On.

The fifth run of the daytime series will be the first drama to premiere in its entirety on BBC iPlayer.

As with previous series, the drama will consist of five stand-alone films, produced by Accused creator McGovern.

Natalie Gumede (Coronation Street), Anita Dobson (EastEnders), Anthony Flanagan (The Village) and Jo Joyner (EastEnders) will be among the new series' stars.

Lee Ingleby (Inspector George Gently), Duncan Preston (Love And Marriage), Ray Fearon (Harry Potter), Emma Cuniffe (The Lakes), Sharon Horgan (Pulling) and Craig Kelly (Coronation Street) will also appear.

The lineup is completed by Taj Atwal (Stella), Amy Nuttall (Downton Abbey), Ramon Tikaram (White Heat), Jo-Anne Knowles (Waterloo Road) Rosalind Ayres (Outnumbered), Emma Lowndes (Cranford) and Keith Barron (The Chase).

Johnny Vegas and Robert Glenister will also direct two of the films.

BBC Daytime's Damian Kavanagh said: "Moving On
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

All at Sea casting news

  • ScreenTerrier
Screenterrier posted a casting call back in February for a new Cbbc series which has been shooting in Manchester since May and is due to hit our screens in September.

The 13 episode comedy drama series centres around 10-year-old Charlie, a highly imaginative boy with heroic leadership skills, qualities that combine to create amazing adventures and terrible chaos.

Charlie, his parents and his brother and sister have just moved to Scarborough from London, downsizing to a family home that doubles as a B&B. Life at the seaside is new to everyone and Charlie loves the freedom, his new friends and their exploits, while his family can’t understand how he creates such havoc around them.

12 year old Ryan Wilkinson (represented by Scream Management) landed the lead role of Charlie in new Cbbc drama All at Sea (aka Family By Sea and Charlie and the Alien). Ryan, from Manchester, has previously appeared in Shameless,
See full article at ScreenTerrier »

TV highlights 28/01/13

  • The Guardian - TV News
Moving On | Great British Menu | Rory and Will – Champions of the World | Revenge | Storyville: The Queen of Versailles | Girls

Sam Wollaston on last night's TV

Moving On

2.15pm, BBC1

Prepare to swerve Dickinson's Real Deal for the week; yes, this absorbing daytime drama is that good. In these five stand-alone stories from Jimmy McGovern's stable, it's the everyday situations that hook you in. Matthew Kelly and Barbara Flynn are compelling and believable as a couple whose priorities gently switch from selling their house to helping a grieving mother, when their front garden becomes a shrine after a man is killed on the road outside. More goodies follow every day this week with Robert Glenister and Johnny Vegas among those on directing duties. Hannah Verdier

Great British Menu

7.30pm, BBC2

After a regal start cooking for the Queen, it seems to have become increasingly difficult for Great British Menu to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV highlights 14/11/2011

  • The Guardian - TV News
Moving On | Young Apprentice | Confessions of An Undercover Cop | Art Of America | Ross Kemp Back On the Frontline | American Horror Story

Moving On

2.15pm, BBC1

Bugsy Mullen's a lovely fella, a milkman who lets lippy kids Dylan and Josh ride on the back of his float. Then Dylan falls and bangs his head, a sore temptation to the lad's single mum, Ally, when an ambulance-chasing lawyer gets involved. This Jimmy McGovern-created daytime drama, the first of five new weekday episodes, may not burn with the righteous anger of the writer's post-watershed offerings, but it's a gently pointed piece that turns as much on recent changes in benefit laws as it does on lampooning the idea of the morning pint provider as lothario. Jonathan Wright

Young Apprentice

9pm, BBC1

This week it's a product-based task for the plucky entrepreneurs-in-waiting, as they're made to select items to sell to an older
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Anna Massey dies aged 73

The award-winning actor of stage and screen, who became the mainstay of the British costume drama, has died after suffering from cancer

Anna Massey, the award-winning British actor who played innocent victim for both Alfred Hitchcock and Michael Powell, has died from cancer at the age of 73. The news was confirmed in a brief statement from her agent: "Anna Massey Cbe passed away peacefully on Sunday 3rd July, with her husband and son by her side."

The daughter of the Hollywood actor Raymond Massey, Anna Massey began her career on stage, picking up a Tony nomination for her turn in The Reluctant Debutante at the age of 18. She made her screen debut in the 1958 crime drama Gideon's Day, directed by her godfather John Ford, and co-starred with Laurence Olivier on the cult 60s thriller Bunny Lake is Missing.

Yet Massey looks set to be best remembered for her roles in
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Anna Massey Dead at 73: Worked for Alfred Hitchcock, Michael Powell, Otto Preminger

Anna Massey, a Tony nominee who played supporting roles in more than 40 movies, died of cancer on Sunday, July 3, in London. Massey was 73. The daughter of Academy Award nominee Raymond Massey (Abe Lincoln in Illinois) and sister of another Oscar nominee, Daniel Massey (Star!), Anna Massey began her acting career in the late '50s. She was nominated for a Tony for her performance in The Reluctant Debutante (1958), which was made into a movie that same year. Directed by Vincente Minnelli, the movie version starred Sandra Dee as an Americanized version of the role Massey had originated in the West End and on Broadway. Massey's first film appearance also took place in 1958, in John Ford's crime drama Gideon's Day, starring Jack Hawkins. Other notable film roles, invariably supporting bigger names, include those in Michael Powell's controversial Peeping Tom (photo, 1960), with Karl Böhm as a fetishistic serial killer; Otto Preminger
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Anna Massey dies aged 73

Anna Massey dies aged 73
The award-winning actor of stage and screen, who became the mainstay of the British costume drama, has died after suffering from cancer

Anna Massey, the award-winning British actor who played innocent victim for both Alfred Hitchcock and Michael Powell, has died from cancer at the age of 73. The news was confirmed in a brief statement from her agent: "Anna Massey Cbe passed away peacefully on Sunday 3rd July, with her husband and son by her side."

The daughter of the Hollywood actor Raymond Massey, Anna Massey began her career on stage, picking up a Tony nomination for her turn in The Reluctant Debutante at the age of 18. She made her screen debut in the 1958 crime drama Gideon's Day, directed by her godfather John Ford, and co-starred with Laurence Olivier on the cult 60s thriller Bunny Lake is Missing.

Yet Massey looks set to be best remembered for her roles in two of the most controversial pictures of post-war British cinema. In 1960 she played Helen, the sweet-natured friend of a serial killer in Michael Powell's notorious Peeping Tom. In 1972, she was cast as sacrificial barmaid Babs Milligan in Hitchcock's grubby, London-set thriller Frenzy. Peeping Tom found itself reviled by contemporary critics as "perverted" and "beastly", while Frenzy remains the only Hitchcock film to receive a prohibitive X-certificate in the UK. Today, both films are widely regarded as classics.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

My beautiful moment with Jenny Agutter

The actor certainly looks her age. But I can still see the Railway Children's Bobbie in her face

I haven't visited a home for a while, in which the television stays on, with the volume turned off, as social activity putters on. But I did on Sunday, and found the screen very hard entirely to ignore. I'm glad of it, though, because something lovely happened. A familiar, beautiful face appeared on the screen, Jenny Agutter's face, familiar, beautiful and unmistakably almost 60. I didn't know who she was playing, or what she was in – something called Moving On, apparently. But having her in the room, unnipped, untucked, unsmoothed, unweird, her 18-year-old Railway- Children face still there, with all the life she has lived since then there too, was affirming, calming, and altogether pretty damned great.

TelevisionDeborah Orr

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2011 | Use of this content is subject
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BBC announces more 'Moving On'

BBC announces more 'Moving On'
BBC One has announced that daytime drama Moving On will return for a third run. The series, created by Accused creator Jimmy McGovern, has been renewed for five more stand-alone episodes. Actors lined up for the new run include Waterloo Road's Eva Pope and former Shameless star Dean Lennox Kelly. Reece Dinsdale, known for his role as Joe McIntyre on Coronation Street, will also feature, as will Land Girls actress Christine Bottomley and ex-The Bill actor Paul Usher. BBC Daytime Controller Liam Keelen said: "The reception that the second (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

BBC told to improve 'formulaic and derivative' shows

Trust review found a lack of ambition and creative risk-taking in programming, especially in daytime schedule

BBC Trust has told corporation bosses to improve programming on BBC1 and BBC2 within a year after a review found parts of the schedule "formulaic and derivative".

The trust's review of the three networks' service licences found that overall they were "broadly" delivering high quality and popular programming, but added that there was a lack of ambition and creative risk-taking and dearth of "fresh and new ideas".

Viewer research found that parts of the BBC daytime schedule "lacked quality" with too many shows described as "collectable hunting and property". The BBC Trust said it was "concerned" that a "formulaic and derivative" schedule is damaging the corporation's reputation.

The report found that a third of viewers of BBC1, which has a total budget of £1.37bn or 41% of the licence fee, felt that the channel did
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV drama must stop relying on irony and costumes, says Jimmy McGovern

In a swipe at BBC bosses, the screen veteran urges writers to reflect their viewers' actual lives and concerns

Television drama should say more about the world we live in today and not rely on costumes, irony and pastiche, according to the award-winning screenwriter Jimmy McGovern. The television veteran behind the uncompromising hit shows Cracker and The Street is calling for dramas that reflect reality and have a strong point to make.

"Why write drama that doesn't matter?" he asked this weekend. Commenting on the high viewing figures for costume dramas such as ITV's Downton Abbey and the popularity of arch adventure shows such as Dr Who, McGovern said he believed the best writing took itself seriously, as well as taking its audience seriously.

"The only way to tell stories on TV is to convince people that what they are seeing is actually happening now and is real. I just can't handle the tongue-in-cheek approach,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ready Steady Cook gets the chop

BBC axes long-running cookery show as part of a revamp of its daytime schedules

Ready Steady Cook, one of the shows that kickstarted UK TV's lifestyle programming boom in the mid 1990s, is being axed by the BBC after nearly 16 years.

The show is being dropped as part of a move by the BBC to reinvigorate its daytime programming.

The show, which has been fronted by Ainsley Harriott since 2000, began in 1994 and is thought to be the longest-running cookery show currently on TV. Ready Steady Cook was originally launched with Fern Britton as host.

No more new series of the show are to be made and the final episodes, a run of repeats, will disappear from screens at some point next year. A total of 21 series and almost 2,000 episodes of the Endemol-produced UK show have been made to date. The format has been sold to more than 20 countries around the world.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rewriting the BBC1 daytime schedule: what would you include?

We'll soon be bidding farewell to daytime stalwarts To Buy Or Not To Buy, Murder She Wrote and Diagnosis Murder. So what should replace them?

The current BBC1 daytime schedule acts as a reliable friend to students, stay-at-home parents, home-workers and pensioners up and down the country. Admittedly a friend who's both freakishly obsessed with the contents of your loft and utterly convinced that the world is full of moustache-twirling fraudsters hell-bent on ripping you off and selling your identity to a nefarious ring of Bosnian immigrants, but it's a friend nonetheless.

However, a change is coming. BBC Vision director Jana Bennett has announced that BBC1 will axe its long-standing daytime property show To Buy Or Not To Buy from its schedules, and also plans to phase out Murder She Wrote and Diagnosis Murder at the same time. This is apparently to allow the channel to concentrate on current affairs,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BBC1 axes To Buy or Not to Buy

Property show to be dropped and channel will also phase out Us imports such as Murder She Wrote from daytime

The BBC1 property show To Buy or Not to Buy has been axed and the channel is also to phase out Us imports such as Diagnosis Murder and Murder She Wrote from daytime.

After seven years on air To Buy or Not to By, which gives prospective home-owners the chance to "try before they buy" is being dropped. The decision was announced today by BBC Vision director Jana Bennett.

Earlier this year, the BBC Trust said public consultation showed that some viewers felt BBC daytime had too many of the type of shows characterised by the trust as "'collectible hunting' and property".

The BBC daytime controller, Liam Keelan, is keen to change daytime by putting on more current affairs, original dramas and consumer affairs shows.

Bennett said she also wants
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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