7.8/10
12,580
57 user 174 critic

A torinói ló (2011)

Not Rated | | Drama | 31 March 2011 (Hungary)
Trailer
2:35 | Trailer
A rural farmer is forced to confront the mortality of his faithful horse.

Directors:

, (co-director)

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay)
7 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

An innocent young man witnesses violence break out after an isolated village is inflamed by the arrival of a circus and its peculiar attractions: a giant whale and a mysterious man named "The Prince."

Directors: Béla Tarr, Ágnes Hranitzky
Stars: Lars Rudolph, Peter Fitz, Hanna Schygulla
Satantango (1994)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  

Plotting on a payment they are about to receive, residents of a collapsing collective farm see their plans turn into desolation when they discover that Irimiás, a former co-worker who they thought was dead, is coming back to the village.

Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Mihály Vig, Putyi Horváth, László feLugossy
Kárhozat (1988)
Crime | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

A lonely barfly falls in love with a married bar singer.

Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Gábor Balogh, János Balogh, Péter Breznyik Berg
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

After witnessing a crime during his night shift as railway switchman near the docks, a man finds a briefcase full of money. While he and his family step up their living standards, others start looking for the disappeared case.

Directors: Béla Tarr, Ágnes Hranitzky
Stars: Miroslav Krobot, Tilda Swinton, Erika Bók
Family Nest (1977)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The breakdown of the relationship of a couple by living in a flat of the husband's parents.

Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Laszlone Horvath, László Horváth, Gábor Kun
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A large, claustrophobic apartment is the setting for this intense chamber drama. In this dense setting, the inhabitants of the apartment reveal their darkest secrets, fears, obsessions and hostilities.

Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Hédi Temessy, Erika Bodnár, Miklós B. Székely
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A husband and wife, drifting apart, reflect on the events leading up to the worst argument of their marriage.

Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Judit Pogány, Róbert Koltai, Kyri Ambrus
Nostalgia (1983)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

A Russian poet and his interpreter travel to Italy to research the life of an 18th-century composer.

Director: Andrei Tarkovsky
Stars: Oleg Yankovskiy, Erland Josephson, Domiziana Giordano
The Mirror (1974)
Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

A dying man in his forties remembers his past. His childhood, his mother, the war, personal moments and things that tell of the recent history of all the Russian nation.

Director: Andrei Tarkovsky
Stars: Margarita Terekhova, Filipp Yankovskiy, Ignat Daniltsev
The Sacrifice (1986)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

At the dawn of World War III, a man searches for a way to restore peace to the world and finds he must give something in return.

Director: Andrei Tarkovsky
Stars: Erland Josephson, Susan Fleetwood, Allan Edwall
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

The story of a mistreated donkey and the people around him. A study on saintliness and a sister piece to Bresson's Mouchette.

Director: Robert Bresson
Stars: Anne Wiazemsky, Walter Green, François Lafarge
Muhamed (2017)
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

A young boy plays an accordion in a shopping mall. Béla Tarr picks up the camera one more time to shoot his very last scene. It is his anger about how refugees are treated in Europe, especially in Hungary.

Director: Béla Tarr
Stars: Muhamed Osmanovic
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
... Ohlsdorfer
... Ohlsdorfer's daughter
... Bernhard
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Ricsi ... Horse
Mihály Ráday ... Narrator (voice)
Edit

Storyline

1889. German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche witnessed the whipping of a horse while traveling in Turin, Italy. He tossed his arms around the horse's neck to protect it then collapsed to the ground. In less than one month, Nietzsche would be diagnosed with a serious mental illness that would make him bed-ridden and speechless for the next eleven years until his death. But whatever did happen to the horse? This film, which is Tarr's last, follows up this question in a fictionalized story of what occurred. The man who whipped the horse is a rural farmer who makes his living taking on carting jobs into the city with his horse-drawn cart. The horse is old and in very poor health, but does its best to obey its master's commands. The farmer and his daughter must come to the understanding that it will be unable to go on sustaining their livelihoods. The dying of the horse is the foundation of this tragic tale. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

pessimism | horse | bed | bucket | well | See All (29) »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

| | | |

Language:

|

Release Date:

31 March 2011 (Hungary)  »

Also Known As:

Le cheval de Turin  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$9,145, 12 February 2012, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$53,690, 8 July 2012
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

, ,  »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Bela Tarr, the film is just a simple anti-creation story. See more »

Quotes

Bernhard: Everything's in ruins, everything's been degraded, but I could say that they've ruined and degraded everything, because this is not some kind of cataclysm coming about with so-called "innocent" human aid, on the contrary, it's about man's own judgment over his own self, which of course God has a big hand in, or, dare I say, takes part in, and whatever he takes part in is the most ghastly creation that you can imagine, because, you see, the world has been debased, so it doesn't matter what I say...
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Highly oblique existentialist parable

Tarr's self-proclaimed last film is as open to interpretation as any movie ever was. The film follows a man, his daughter, and their horse as they struggle to survive during hard times in the late nineteenth century. It's a simple, practically minimalist movie with all the repetition that aesthetic implies, gradually coming to a crescendo that's somewhat reminiscent on a small scale of the disharmony the develops in a previous film, Werckmeister Harmonies.

The idea for the movie came from an apocryphal story (Tarr doesn't label it as such) about Nietzsche's time in Turin, which relates how the philosopher broke down upon witnessing a carriage driver whip his horse. The filmmakers were interested to look at what happened next for the horse. They also see the incident as representing a sincere recantation of all his works by the philosopher (or heavily imply so). One can apprehend from listening to Tarr that he believes Nietzsche was little more than a psychotic, responsible for promulgating a decline in values. The film depicts such a decline, though any actual link to Nietzsche other than by free association and any substantive intellectual link to the Turin episode are tenuous at best.

Tarr announced in the Q&A following the UK Premiere of Turin Horse at the Edinburgh International Film Festvial, that he felt "something's wrong", in a grand sense. The Turin Horse reflects this concern. What exactly is wrong is left almost entirely up to you as the viewer to determine. There's one clear allusion to watching television, but other than that the symptomatology and etiology of modern malaise is open to question. You could say that was a weakness of the movie, someone who believes that free migration and rights for gays are the cause for societal decay, would be equally at home watching this movie as someone who points towards revolutions in social media and the society of spectacle.

Patricularly given that no root cause is identified, Tarr and co leave themselves open to charges of the familiar canard of archaism - supposing that the past was a safer more moral and ingenious place. The artist Jeff Koons has perhaps the best counterarguments to Tarr's perspective on modern life. His stated mission is to "remove bourgeois guilt and shame in responding to banality" (highlighting the snobbery of those who cling to traditional values), whereas Tarr's is perhaps to stoke it. I suppose what side you take depends on whether you see someone fragging on a PlayStation and think "good for them", or whether you bemoan their lack of appetite for self-improvement or meaningful interaction with others. In the Q&A at the Edinburgh Film Festival Tarr said that he thinks that people spend too much time stuck in front of screens waiting forlornly for something to happen, part of a sort of technological cargo cult if you will.

On a gut level I felt the film went quickly; although empirically it's well over two hours long, it's definitely mesmerising. I've felt for a time that the best way to appreciate Werckmeister Harmonies is as narrative music, as a kind of prelude and fugue, similarly The Turin Horse works well simply in terms of rhythm and visual tone, as a meaningless sketch of the interaction of three hardy entities.


44 of 64 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 57 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Horror and Thriller Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular horror and thriller movies available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed