6.2/10
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Breaking Upwards (2009)

TV-MA | | Romance | 14 March 2009 (USA)
Trailer
2:26 | Trailer
A young New York couple intricately strategize their own break up.

Director:

Daryl Wein

Writers:

Peter Duchan (screenplay), Zoe Lister-Jones (screenplay) (as Zoe Lister Jones) | 1 more credit »
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Zoe Lister-Jones ... Zoe (as Zoe Lister Jones)
Daryl Wein ... Daryl
Julie White ... Joanie
Andrea Martin ... Helaine
Peter Friedman ... Alan
LaChanze ... Maggie
Ebon Moss-Bachrach ... Dylan
Olivia Thirlby ... Erika
Pablo Schreiber ... Turner
Heather Burns ... Hannah
Tate Ellington ... Brian
Francis Benhamou ... Lindsay
David Call ... David
Sam Rosen Sam Rosen ... Jack
Max Jenkins ... Frosh
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Storyline

Daryl and Zoe have been together for four years and boredom begins to be felt; their bond, however, is so deep that it is almost an addiction they cannot do without. They therefore decide to plan their separation, establishing a relationship strategy according to which they will be able to see each other on alternate days and meet other people, experiencing the open couple model firsthand. Parents are also involved in this attempt, giving advice, but above all asking the same questions as their children.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Romance

Certificate:

TV-MA
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Helaine: I'm a sculptor.
Frosh: Do you... what kind of material do you work with?
Helaine: Blood.
Frosh: ou sculpt blood?
[Helaine nods]
Frosh: Do you freeze the blood? How do you harden...
Helaine: [interrupts] That's absolutely right. How do you know that?
Frosh: Well, I'm educated.
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User Reviews

 
A Wonderful Intimate Movie
7 June 2009 | by macleod5555See all my reviews

Back when I was in high school, I showed a group of my friends Woody Allen's Annie Hall. When it was over, everyone agreed that they'd enjoyed it, but I was asked to explain why, exactly, it was such a classic/masterpiece/staple of American filmdom. At the time I didn't really have a good answer beyond the fact that it was funny. But looking back, I saw that aside from being one of the best romantic comedies, it was also one of the saddest romantic tragedies. And the tragedy isn't theatrical melodramatic. The couple isn't separated by war or terminal illness or mutual suicide or anything like that. The tragedy is quieter: the lovers separate because, simply, people fall out of love. Or, put directly by a stranger passing Woody Allen on the street, "Love fades." And afterwords, when everything settles, the partners are older and hopefully wiser, able to look back fondly from a distance without bitterness or regret. And that, to me, is more beautiful and sad than any idealized tragic love affair.

All of which brings us to Breaking Upwards, another New York tragicomic love story, which I had the good fortune of seeing this weekend at the Brooklyn International Film Festival (or BIFF). Breaking Upwards follows two New York hipsters who, after a four year relationship, decide that they're no longer happy together but somehow can't stand being apart. And so they decide to break up by increments: they take days off, experiment with open relationships, and hope that they can wean themselves off of co-dependence.

The film feels very much like a labor of love. In an autobiographical move (one that feels more gutsy than indulgent), filmmakers Daryl Wein and Zoe Lister-Jones co-wrote the script based on their own relationship and star, somewhat nakedly, as fictionalized versions of themselves, even sharing their first name with their character. (Wein also directs, and Lister-Jones wrote the lyrics for the film's original songs). But more important is that it feels real: intimate and heartfelt.

At its best, the film feels very well observed, with a naturalistic tone that knows how to find small bits of comedy and sadness in the details. The performers play off one another with ease and chemistry, as the situation starts funny and turns melancholy. Daryl and Zoe trade off the upper-hand, each taking turns feeling hurt and, despite their intentions, being hurtful.

The film plays with conflicting desires: possessiveness with a need for freedom, looking for someone else and regretting it afterwords. And for the most part, it plays the emotion with a light hand. "I don't want to do this if you're not OK," Zoe says to Daryl before she goes to stay with another man. "Yes you do," he cuts her off. And then the exchange ends with exasperated sighs and a parting of ways.

Unfortunately, the film does less well in moments that feel more calculated: a laugh line here or there, a character, a scene. Near the end, the public dinner table climax (followed by a witty remark) feels closer to stock movie situations than the naturalism that suits the film so well.

But it ends quiet and open, with graceful ambiguity.

Part of Breaking Upwards' appeal is the hand-crafted appeal of independent film. Extras are enthusiastically credited based on how many times they were willing to appear (3x!), and the way the lighting sometimes switches from realism to expressionism, rather than an inconsistency, feels like new filmmakers playing with technique. Even the occasional low sound quality adds to the feeling of young people making do.

At the screening, the filmmakers said that they've been having difficulty finding a distributor so far, which is a pity. The movie is not perfect or Earth-shattering or anything more than a fine redux of older ideas (the main caveat is that anyone with an aversion for hipsters would likely be turned off). But it's funny and it's sad, covering time-honored thematic ground with an open-hearted affection that makes those time-honored themes feel personal. And it's better than most movies that are out right now.

At the screening I went to, you could feel everyone on the emotional wavelength of the movie. Personal and universal are similar. Here's hoping that more people get the chance to see it.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 March 2009 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Doseis horismou See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$15,467, 4 April 2010

Gross USA:

$77,389

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$77,389
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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