Two friends spend all their free time building flame-throwers and weapons of mass destruction in hopes that a global apocalypse will occur and clear the runway for their imaginary gang "Mother Medusa".

Director:

Evan Glodell

Writer:

Evan Glodell
5 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Evan Glodell ... Woodrow
Jessie Wiseman Jessie Wiseman ... Milly
Tyler Dawson ... Aiden
Rebekah Brandes ... Courtney
Vincent Grashaw ... Mike
Zack Kraus ... Elliot
Keghan Hurst Keghan Hurst ... Sarah
Alexandra Boylan ... Mad Dog's Waitress
Bradshaw Pruitt Bradshaw Pruitt ... Mad Dog's Bartender
Brian Thomas Evans ... Dirty Trucker
Britta Jacobellis Britta Jacobellis ... Neighbor With Dogs
Ceaser Flores Ceaser Flores ... Scary Guy at Party
Chris Snyder Chris Snyder ... Tattoo Guy
Dan Dulle Dan Dulle ... Motorcycle Owner
Jon Huck ... John Huck
Edit

Storyline

Bellflower follows two friends as they venture out into the world to begin their adult lives. Literally all their free time is spent building flame-throwers and weapons of mass destruction in hopes that a global apocalypse will occur and clear the runway for their imaginary gang "Mother Medusa". While waiting for the world to end, their call to excitement comes unexpectedly when one of them meets a charismatic young woman and falls hard in love. Quickly integrated into a new group of friends, they set off on a journey of betrayal, love, hate, infidelity and extreme violence more devastating and fiery than any of their apocalyptic fantasies. Often life's simplest and most obvious truths are the hardest to see, but once you've burned everything to the ground it may be the only thing left standing. Written by Coatwolf Productions

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A love story with apocalyptic stakes.

Genres:

Action | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for disturbing violence, some strong sexuality, nudity, pervasive language and some drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

No functionality of the Medusa car was faked during filming. The real-life car is equipped with two flamethrowers, smoke screen, a bleach drift-kit, adjustable rear suspension, and 3 surveillance cameras; all controlled from the dashboard. It also has a roll cage and stow-able, fold-down back seat. See more »

Goofs

After they arrive at the birthday party, Milly hands Woodrow a bottle, the camera cuts, and she hands him the bottle again. See more »

Quotes

Aiden: Dude you are fucking Lord Humongous. The master of fire, the king of the wasteland. Lord Humongous doesn't get cheated on by some stupid bitch. Lord Humongous doesn't say was it good for you, he doesn't say who called or where were you last night. He doesn't leave the fucking gang when he falls in love. Nobody fucking tells Lord Humongous what to do. Lord Humongous fights when he wants to fights and fucks when he wants to fuck and when all else fails he drives straight into the fucking tanker. ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the credit for "MEDUSA CAR RESSURECTION AND SUPERCHARGING," "resurrection" is misspelled. See more »

Connections

References The Road Warrior (1981) See more »

Soundtracks

Let's Make This A Moment To Remember
Written by Johnny Jewel
Performed by Chromatics
Courtesy of Italians Do It Better
See more »

User Reviews

 
A lot of promise that dwindles as it progresses.
29 October 2011 | by Rockwell_CronenbergSee all my reviews

Bellflower is an interesting film because even in it's flaws it kind of speaks to the kind of film that it is. Unfortunately for me though, that doesn't mean crap when the flaws are so blatant and intrusive. The film starts off interestingly, a really in-your-face turn back the clock montage that takes us to the beginning of our characters, two wild twenty-something youths who spend their free time (which it seems is all they have for some untold reason) preparing for their Mad Max vision of the end of the world. In their mind it's perfectly normal to spend their time building flamethrowers and tricking out muscle cars, which is so dumb and idiotic and an absolute perfect depiction of men at this time in their life.

The first hour takes a relatively standard approach to following these guys, but despite some pretty awful amateur performances and awkwardly obvious pieces of dialogue, it had a certain charm for me. Writer/director/star Evan Glodell gives an aesthetic feeling that was off-putting at first -- the focus falls off every so often, flecks off dirt come up into the lens -- once I settled into it I really began to embrace the tone he was going for. However once the film started to really get a rhythm going it decided to awkwardly jump forward a period of time (you can tell because the main character has a beard now!) it really caves in on itself.

It was going along smoothly but then decided to move the plot forward into more serious territory and then none of it worked anymore. Those bad performances became worse as the scenes progressed further and further into laughably horrendous melodrama with some of the most obvious and artificial character progressions and dialogue stretches I've seen. The film spirals down and down until it gets to it's last two chunks where I was just hoping they would clip the wings off and stop tarnishing the promise it once showed. There's a disastrous fifteen-minute sequence that felt absolutely worthless even before we find out that it actually is worthless, followed by the final act which just nonsensically rambles on for what seems like an eternity.

Ultimately, it felt like this was a premise that would have worked great as a short feature, but in stretching it out to something full-length Glodell really destroyed everything he had going for him. Still, despite ultimately being a failure, I think Glodell shows some promise here as a filmmaker and I'll be curious to see what he does next.


48 of 74 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 57 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 March 2012 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Bellflower See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$17,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,279, 7 August 2011

Gross USA:

$168,226

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$172,935
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Coatwolf Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby (Dolby 5.1)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed