7.3/10
70,968
267 user 226 critic

Enter the Void (2009)

Not Rated | | Drama, Fantasy | 5 May 2010 (France)
Trailer
2:07 | Trailer
An American drug dealer living in Tokyo is betrayed by his best friend and killed in a drug deal. His soul, observing the repercussions of his death, seeks resurrection.

Director:

Gaspar Noé

Writers:

Gaspar Noé, Lucile Hadzihalilovic (with the help of)
Reviews
Popularity
1,892 ( 20)
4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Paz de la Huerta ... Linda
Nathaniel Brown ... Oscar
Cyril Roy ... Alex
Olly Alexander ... Victor
Masato Tanno Masato Tanno ... Mario
Ed Spear Ed Spear ... Bruno
Emily Alyn Lind ... Little Linda
Jesse Kuhn Jesse Kuhn ... Little Oscar
Nobu Imai Nobu Imai ... Tito
Sakiko Fukuhara Sakiko Fukuhara ... Saki
Janice Béliveau-Sicotte Janice Béliveau-Sicotte ... Mother (as Janice Sicotte-Béliveau)
Sara Stockbridge ... Suzy (as Sarah Stockbridge)
Stuart Miller Stuart Miller ... Victor's Father
Emi Takeuchi Emi Takeuchi ... Carol (as Yemi)
Rumiko Kimishima Rumiko Kimishima ... Rumi
Edit

Storyline

Tokyo's nasty underside, seen primarily through the eyes of Oscar, a heavy drug user, whose sister Linda is a stripper. Oscar also has flashbacks to his childhood when trauma upends the siblings. Oscar's drug-fed hallucinations alter Tokyo's already-disconcerting nights, and after the police shoot him, he can float above and look down: on his sister's sorrow, on the rooms of a love hotel, and on life at even a molecular level. The spectrum's colors can be beautiful; it's people's colorless lives that can be ugly. And what of afterlife, is there more than a void? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

4 months after the world premiere in Cannes - the film, still not completely finished, was presented a second time at the Toronto Film Festival in September 2009. Close after this festival, the film was shown at several international film festivals - in Cataluña, London (both in October 2009), Stockholm (November 2009) and Tallinn (December 2009) See more »

Goofs

During the first sequence in the "Sex, Money, Power" strip club, the camera and jib/crane are visible in the reflection of the platform the dancers are on. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Oscar: Hey. Hey, Linda. C'mere. Come outside. I wonder what Tokyo looks like from up there.
Linda: I don't.
Oscar: Why not?
Linda: I'd be scared.
Oscar: Scared of what?
Linda: Of dying, I guess. Falling into the void.
Oscar: They say you fly when you die.
Linda: It's fucking cold.
See more »

Crazy Credits

At the Cannes Film Festival the film was screened without any opening or closing credits, the film began with "ENTER" and ended with "THE VOID". See more »

Alternate Versions

In some countries, the theatrical release was shortened by omitting reel 7 of 9. This removed 17 minutes of material. See more »

Connections

Referenced in O Cão (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

God's Own Dibber
From the album "L-Fields"
Performed and Composed by Michael Prime
Courtesy of Sonoris
See more »

User Reviews

 
Relentlessly Nauseating Modern Art
4 October 2010 | by radioheadrcmSee all my reviews

Enter the Void is exactly the kind of polarizing film that cinema needs right now. Too many films these days play it safe, being concerned with keeping the audience comfortable, safe and happy. Enter Gaspar Noe, who clearly has no regard either for the well-being of either the audience or his actors. We have antagonistically long (but brilliant) takes, beginning in an apartment and ending in a bar, several blocks over. We are given characters and are exposed to their darkest moments, but are never given a real reason to care for them, or to perceive them as anything but wretched. We are also shown some sexually discomforting things that we never really wanted to see on the silver screen (if you've seen it you probably know what I'm talking about). Also, the film is almost completely in first-person viewpoint, so you're constantly feeling confined to what Oscar is looking at, which are mostly psychedelic images. In effect, the feel and tone of the story are immediately off-putting for the viewer, but since you've already bought a ticket, what can you do but follow it through?

This is definitely the kind of film that can be approached in the wrong way, both with the medium that you view it through, and with your state of mind. Enter the Void is meant to be a transportive film (i.e. you living directly in the viewpoint of another, and feeling how that person feels, and perhaps even thinking how that person thinks). To technically maximize the experience, the film should really be experienced on the big screen. I'd imagine an IMAX screen to be ideal.

I also think a film like Enter the Void really needs to be approached with a separate set of goals than that of a normal film. First of all, chuck any notions of entertainment, or even enjoyment, out the window. While you're at it, remove any notions of positivity that you can think of. The only reactions that Enter the Void will draw from you are negative ones. Personally, the only emotion I consistently felt was a slight nausea, tinted with the occasional horror, or perhaps a shameful arousal, as there is excessive sexual content that is all wretched in one way or another.

The film is shot with a certain frame of mind, and sticks to it with remarkable faith. It's in the point of view of a small group of friends who are confined to the drug and clubbing scenes in Tokyo. He then films them in the most abrasive ways possible, showering the viewer in infinite neon lights, and fish-eyed close-ups, and then Noe lets his frames linger on these unsightly images for uncomfortably long. Even with his tracking shots moving from one location to another, when the viewer is normally given a moments rest, he rapidly cuts across hallways, stairs, and streets, and never gives the viewer a free moment to settle down.

Despite the film's antagonistic feel, and despite the physical and psychological discomforts that the film drew from me, I still found Enter the Void to be a worthwhile and even inspirational experience. More to the point, Enter the Void may not be a friendly experience, but this exact kind of experimentation and determined expression are just what cinema needs in order to be taken seriously as an artistic medium, when so many other directors air on the side of caution and safety. It might be a difficult ride, but just watch it once and you'll carry it with you forever.


168 of 221 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 267 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

France | Germany | Italy | Canada | Japan

Language:

English | Japanese

Release Date:

5 May 2010 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Enter the Void See more »

Filming Locations:

Japan See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$16,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$43,651, 26 September 2010

Gross USA:

$336,467

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$775,385
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed