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Tim Blake Nelson Set to Direct a Sci-Fi Action Film Called Michael Zero

Tim Blake Nelson is best known for his acting role in films such as O Brother Where Art Thou, The Incredible Hulk, and a ton of other films. He's a great actor that takes on a lot of co-starring roles. What you may not know about him is that he's also been directing films since 1997. Films such as O, The Grey Zone, Leaves of Grass, and Anesthesia.

Now he's set to direct a sci-fi action thriller called Michael Zero for Millennium Media and Eclectic Pictures, and it's based on a spec from Adam Alleca (Last House on the Left). There's no word on if he also plans on starring in the film or not, but I hope he's in it!

The high-concept sci-fi action-thriller follows Michael Redmayne, who is forced to hunt down and kill his clones after they desert the war they were created to fight, in order to
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Dennis O’Neil: The Perils of Captain Mighty

  • Comicmix
Okay, let’s get this out of the way at the beginning: Yesterday I published a novel. The title is The Perils of Captain Mighty and the Redemption of Danny the Kid. I’ll add one more fact: The original title was The Perils of Captain Power and the Redemption of Danny the Kid, but there were a couple of still active copyrights for “Captain Power” and although these copyrights weren’t likely to cause any problems, they could, and so Power becomes Mighty and we proceed to the next paragraph.

Are you expecting a little chest-beating here? Not happening. Not that I have anything against some self-congratulation and some of the writers I most admire were not above it. To cite three, a trio of my favorite Nineteenth Century scribblers: Charles Dickens (who, according to one source “thrived in the spotlight”); Mark Twain (who, according to another, had a “flair self-promotion”); and Walt Whitman,
See full article at Comicmix »

The Comedian Starring Robert De Niro and an All-Star Cast Debuts on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital May 2nd

Two-Time Academy Award Winner Robert De Niro Leads an All-Star Cast, Including Leslie Mann, Danny DeVito, Edie Falco, Charles Grodin, Cloris Leachman, Patti LuPone and Harvey Keitel in The Comedian

Two-time Academy Award winner Robert De Niro (Best Supporting Actor, The Godfather: Part II, 1974; Best Actor, Raging Bull, 1980) stars as an aging insult comic trying to reinvent himself for acclaimed filmmaker Taylor Hackford (Ray) in the comedy-drama The Comedian. De Niro’s eight-years-in-the-making passion project also stars Leslie Mann (Knocked Up), Danny DeVito (“Always Sunny in Philadelphia”), Edie Falco (“The Sopranos”), Charles Grodin (Dave), Academy Award winner Cloris Leachman (Best Supporting Actress, The Last Picture Show, 1971), Patti LuPone (“Penny Dreadful”), and Academy Award nominee Harvey Keitel (Best Supporting Actor, Bugsy, 1991), with a cast that includes Lucy DeVito (Leaves of Grass) and Billy Crystal (When Harry Met Sally…). In addition, the film features a veritable who’s who of stand-up comedians,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Memorial Music

Paul Hindemith: When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd: A Requiem for Those We Love Jan De Gaetani/William Stone/Atlanta Symphony Chorus & Orchestra/Robert Shaw (Telarc)

Memorial Day started spontaneously and independently in several towns and cities in 1866 as a way of honoring soldiers who died in the Civil War by placing flowers on their graves -- thus the holiday's old name, Decoration Day.

At first there was not a specific date, but observation was made more uniform starting in 1868; May 30 was chosen, supposedly because it was not the anniversary of a specific battle and because by then flowers would be in bloom throughout the country. 

After World War I, the observances were expanded to include the deceased of that fresh conflict, and in the decades since, the holiday has come to honor all fallen servicemen. A century after its start, the observance was changed to the last
See full article at CultureCatch »

Tribeca Film Festival: ‘Anesthesia’ Interviews

After the success of Leaves of Grass, Anesthesia is Tim Blake Nelson’s second feature length film in which he held four major roles. The film follows Walter Zarrow (Waterston), a professor who goes to the corner deli to buy some flower for his wife Marcia (Close). He has a conversation with the store keeper and finally introduces himself after buying flowers from him for oh so many years. However, as soon as we cut away from Zarrow, we see he was stabbed just outside an Upper West Side building…

With Anesthesia on limited release across the Us now, here’s interviews with Nelson and the rest of the cast from last years Tribeca Film Festival.

Tim Blake Nelson:

Mickey Sumner:

Jessica Hecht:

Ben Konigsberg:

Sam Waterston:
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Anesthesia’ Review

Stars: Tim Blake Nelson, Sam Waterston, Glenn Close, Gretchen Mol, Kristen Stewart, Corey Stoll, Mickey Summer | Written and Directed by Tim Blake Nelson

We asked O Brother Where Art Thou?. We’ve seen him help dig Holes. We watched him hang with presidents in Lincoln, with superheroes in The Incredible Hulk and The Fantastic Four. And of course, pulling over Robert DeNiro and Ben Stiller in Meet the Fockers. And now we see him change roles in directing, writing, producing, and starring in Anesthesia.

Anesthesia is Tim Blake Nelson’s second feature length in which he held all four roles, after the success of Leaves of Grass. Along with Nelson, the film stars Sam Waterston, Glenn Close, Gretchen Mol, Kristen Stewart, Corey Stoll, Mickey Summer, and more.

The film follows Walter Zarrow (Waterston), a professor who goes to the corner deli to buy some flower for his wife Marcia (Close
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Anesthesia | Review

Causality and Kindness: Nelson’s Latest Look at All the Lonely People

The multifaceted Tim Blake Nelson unveils his latest directorial effort in nearly seven years with Anesthesia, a New York set drama focused on a series of interconnected characters leading up to a brutal crime of the narrative’s central figure. It’s sometimes easy to forget Nelson, perhaps best known as a character actor in an incalculable amount of arresting performances across a variety of films, is also an accomplished writer and director, premiering his own eclectic five features since his first (and best) 1997 debut Eye of God. Since then, he made a contemporized version of Shakespeare’s Othello in 2001 with O, an English language drama centered on a rebellious group of Sonderkomandos attempting to overthrow their Nazi captors in the grueling The Grey Zone (also 2001) and a comedy crime drama Leaves of Grass (2009) with Edward Norton pulling double duty as twins.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

[Review] Anesthesia

A retiring Philosophy professor (Sam Waterston) buzzes up to a stranger’s apartment one night, screaming for help. The tenant (Cory Stoll) rushes downstairs, and finds two men, bloody and beaten on the doorstep. One is the ailing professor, and the other, we cannot see. The narrative then flashes back several days to show us how these characters came to meet this gruesome fate. Anesthesia offers an intriguing but familiar set up, which splays the story out into numerous sprawling strands. The film is Altmanesque in its conceptualization, as the lives of roughly a dozen strangers crisscross and interlock in unexpected ways.

Writer-director Tim Blake Nelson, best known as Delmar from O Brother, Where Art Thou?, rounded up a stellar and committed cast, including Glenn Close, Michael K. Williams and Kristen Stewart. The filmmaker seems at home collaborating with actors of this caliber, having directed Edward Norton to not one,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Trailer Watch: Tim Blake Nelson’s Anesthesia

Tim Blake Nelson’s last film, Leaves of Grass, was released five years ago. Since then, the award-winning actor, writer and director has been busy acting in indies such as James Franco’s take on As I Lay Dying, big-budget films such as Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln and on Netflix with an ongoing role in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Anesthesia, Blake Nelson’s latest film as writer-director, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this year and was later picked up by IFC Films. The drama, starring Kristen Stewart and Sam Waterston, alongside Blake Nelson, Glenn Close, Gretchen Mol, Corey Stoll and Michael K. Williams, will hit theaters and on demand on January […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Trailer Watch: Tim Blake Nelson’s Anesthesia

Tim Blake Nelson’s last film, Leaves of Grass, was released five years ago. Since then, the award-winning actor, writer and director has been busy acting in indies such as James Franco’s take on As I Lay Dying, big-budget films such as Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln and on Netflix with an ongoing role in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Anesthesia, Blake Nelson’s latest film as writer-director, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival earlier this year and was later picked up by IFC Films. The drama, starring Kristen Stewart and Sam Waterston, alongside Blake Nelson, Glenn Close, Gretchen Mol, Corey Stoll and Michael K. Williams, will hit theaters and on demand on January […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Kristen Stewart Craves Interaction In Trailer For Tim Blake Nelson’s ‘Anesthesia’

While he has quite a career in front of the camera working for the Coens, Terrence Malick, Steven Spielberg, and many more, Tim Blake Nelson has also carved out a unique directing resume. Following up the entertaining drama Leaves of Grass earlier this decade, he’s now back with Anesthesia, and today brings the first trailer.

Premiering back at Tribeca Film Festival, the story follows New Yorkers who are all positively affected by the same philosophy professor, with an ensemble including Kristen Stewart, Sam Waterston, Glenn Close, Michael K. Williams., and Gretchen Mol. While reviews weren’t overly enthusiastic following its premiere, the trailer sells an engaging drama, and it’ll arrive fairly soon. Check it out below, along with the poster.

A snowy New York City night, a beloved teacher, a shocking crime: this provocative drama pieces together the puzzle of a man’s life just before it changes forever.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Locarno: Edward Norton on Honoring Cinema and Embracing New Technologies

Locarno: Edward Norton on Honoring Cinema and Embracing New Technologies
Fresh off a third Oscar nomination and a healthy haul of critics’ gongs for Alejandro G. Inarritu’s “Birdman,” Edward Norton isn’t so prize-hungry as to covet career honors like the Excellence Award presented to him Wednesday night at the Locarno Film Festival. “I tend to look at these things just as very nice compliments,” he says, his tone almost diffident, before passing the credit back to the festival itself, now in its 68th edition. “In its first year, Locarno showed Rossellini’s ‘Rome, Open City,’ and that’s still such a radical film. It’s flattering to be connected to that tradition of hosting and promoting cinema, even in a small way.”

Mike Shiner, the brilliant egomaniac thespian Norton played in Inarritu’s film, mightn’t have been so magnanimous. If there was a purported hint of self-parody to the performance, Norton’s persona — onscreen or off — has
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Manoel de Oliveira's "Visit, or Memories and Confessions": Magnolia Blooms Twice

  • MUBI
The ghosts did not take long to present themselves. Oliveira's seventh feature, Visita ou Memórias e Confissões, conveys a bevy of autobiographical musings on his family house and himself. Filmed in 1981 when he was 73, yet shelved voluntarily until after his death, Memories and Confessions has since become a kind of talisman for the director, an n+1 variable where the n is his 31-item back catalogue cut short last year. The first character introduced in the movie is a magnolia that blooms twice a year—first in "a rapid blossoming," then in the shape of "a rare star of maturity." Conveniently, the film's structure comprises just what the original title enumerates: a visit, some memories, a handful of confessions. The visitors in question are a man and a woman whom we do not get to see but whose voices we keep hearing off-screen. As they drop in at an empty house
See full article at MUBI »

James Earl Jones Reads From “Leaves of Grass”

It’s not everyday that Darth Vader can get into some poetry. In honor of what would have been American poetry icon Walt Whitman’s 196th birthday yesterday, we bring you this dramatic reading of his work for New York community center 92Y. Actor and national treasure James Earl Jones reads selections from Whitman’s seminal work Leaves of Grass. For […]

The post James Earl Jones Reads From “Leaves of Grass” appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Anesthesia’

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Anesthesia’
Various forms of physical and psychic pain are endured by the talky New Yorkers peopling “Anesthesia,” the fifth feature by actor-director Tim Blake Nelson; as unwittingly promised by the title, however, viewers may not feel them very deeply. Opening with a violent jolt, as a benevolent philosophy professor (Sam Waterston) is brutally assaulted near his Upper West Side apartment, the film gets progressively more anodyne as it files through the problems of those closely and tangentially related to him. That the everyone-is-connected ensemble piece has become such a staple of American independent cinema limits the impact of Nelson’s structural revelations; a poetic throughline isn’t immediately obvious, though the profuse dialogue often is. Despite the presence of names like Kristen Stewart and Glenn Close in the cast, “Anesthesia” is unlikely to rouse much commercial attention.

“Why is the world so base? Why is the world so insensitive?” moans Sophie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tribeca Review: Sam Waterson and Kristen Stewart Get Philosophical in Tim Blake Nelson's 'Anesthesia'

Tribeca Review: Sam Waterson and Kristen Stewart Get Philosophical in Tim Blake Nelson's 'Anesthesia'
Read More: The 2015 Indiewire Tribeca Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During Run of Festival The binary experiences of feeling pain and being numb permeate Tim Blake Nelson's "Anesthesia." Through the actor-turned-filmmaker's previous directorial efforts -- which include 2001's "O," a teen adaptation of Shakespeare's "Othello," and 2009's "Leaves of Grass," which utilizes Plato's Socratic dialogues while swiping its title from a Walt Whitman poem -- we know that Nelson is a student of varying high-brow styles of literature. In the ensemble drama "Anesthesia," he tries to implement not only his idols' eloquent use of words, but also grand philosophical ideas of Schopenhauer, Montaigne and others, focusing on what it means to connect with others. Despite a few stylistic inconsistencies, the conceit mostly works, but it helps that this time Nelson has rounded up a talented group of actors to play his troubled...
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Birdman's Edward Norton Deserves A Golden Globe And So Much More

When we think about some of the more underrated actors in the industry today, Edward Norton is at the top of the list. The actor has stacked up a number of incredible performances in movies such as American History X, Leaves of Grass, Primal Fear, Fight Club and now, the recent Golden Globe nominated Birdman. And what makes Norton so unique is that each performance is strong, but each performance is incredibly different too. So it.s no wonder that Edward Norton.s performance in Birdman has been nominated for a 2015 Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor. This isn.t Norton.s first time at the Golden Globes. You may have forgotten his win in 1997 for Best Supporting Actor, for his performance in Primal Fear. It was Norton.s film debut and he played an altar boy charged with the murder of an archbishop. Norton.s performance stole the show,
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Ensemble Mvp: The Rebirth of Edward Norton

I’m not sure what exact moment in Birdman it occurred to me that we were in the midst of a great Edward Norton Renaissance. Maybe it was when the walls of self-professed artistic integrity that his character Mike Shiner wears came crashing down in the face of Sam (Emma Stone), revealing the tragedy and isolation in his existence. Maybe it was when Mike was so in the moment as an actor, he wanted to have live sex on stage. Or maybe it was just the sight of Norton in a speedo wrestling with Michael Keaton. Either way, I finished that movie with the realization that we are in the midst of a rebirth of Edward Norton.

There was a time when Edward Norton was arguably the best actor on the planet. Just look at his filmography from 1996-2006, and count the number of classics he’s a part of.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Strand’s Stand: How It Keeps Going in the Age of Amazon

  • Vulture
The Strand’s Stand: How It Keeps Going in the Age of Amazon
Walk into the Strand Book Store, at East 12th and Broadway, and the retail experience you’ll have is unexpectedly contemporary. The walls are white, the lighting bright; crisp red signage is visible at every turn. The main floor is bustling, and the store now employs merchandising experts to refine its traffic flow and make sure that prime display space goes to stuff that’s selling. Whereas you can leave a Barnes & Noble feeling numbed, particularly if a clerk directs you to Gardening when you ask for Leaves of Grass, the Strand is simply a warmer place for readers. In the middle of the room, though, is a big concrete column holding up the building, and it looks … wrong. It’s painted gray, and not a soft designer gray but some dead color like you’d see on a basement floor. Crudely stenciled signs reading Books Shipped Anywhere are tacked to it.
See full article at Vulture »

2015 Sundance Film Festival Predictions: Tim Blake Nelson’s Anesthesia

While Tiff has become film premiere terrain for his last director outings (the horribly timed post 9/11 released The Grey Zone and 2009′s Leaves of Grass), Tim Blake Nelson could be deemed as a return customer in Sundance folklore. His stacked resume at Sundance includes his first three premiered and/or workshopped outings (includes his short Kansas), and he is rooted at the Institute, being a Creative Advisor in the Directors Lab on four separate occasions. Employing the mapped out ensemble narrative strategy for his fifth feature film, the multi-tasker called upon a team of fellow thesps in Gretchen Mol, Corey Stoll, Michael Kenneth Williams, Jessica Hecht, Hannah Marks, Glenn Close, Scott Cohen, Sam Waterston and team captain Kristen Stewart (see pap pic above) for Anesthesia. Production on the New York City set drama began late last year, so despite turning into James Franco’s muse (five straight feature films) he
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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