Nanjing! Nanjing! (2009) - News Poster

News

New to Theatres This Weekend: Priest, Bridesmaids, Everything Must Go

This weekend at the box office it's a battle between the first big comedy of the summer and the second comic book movie of the summer. Will Bridesmaids be able to attract both men and women? Will Priest be any better than Legion? It seems unlikely that either film will bring down Thor, but hey, you never know. In select theatres, look for the Will Ferrell dramedy Everything Must Go, Sundance hit Hesher starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Natalie Portman, and the underground dancing drama Go For It!. What will you be checking out this weekend? Priest [1] Bridesmaids [2] Everything Must Go [3] (limited) Hesher [4] (limited) Go For It! [5] (limited) Skateland [6] (limited) Cameraman: The Work and Life of Jack Cardiff [7] (limited) The First Grader [8] (limited) How to Live Forever [9] (limited) L'amour fou [10] (limited) City of Life and Death [11] [1] http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0822847/ [2] http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1478338/ [3] http://www.imdb.
See full article at FilmJunk »

Chinese Pull Two Films from Palm Springs Fest

According to the Palm Springs International Film festival, the reason why the China Film Group has pulled two films from the fest (which got under way Tuesday) is to protest the showing of Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam’s pro-Tibet doc The Sun Behind the Clouds: Tibet’s Struggle for Freedom (trailer on jump). So China pulled the horrific Nanking film The City of Life and Death, which scored with audiences and critics at September’s Toronto Film Fest; National Geographic Films is set to release it in March. The film’s director, Lu Chuan, told the Hollywood Reporter that China is protesting the fest’s inclusion of a film about the Dalai Lama. China also pulled a second film, Ye Kai’s short Quick Quick Slow Slow. This is not the first time China has interfered with its filmmakers showing their work abroad.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

2010 movie preview: 15 films you probably didn’t know you should be excited for

A few days back John made the rather excellent list of 15 films that are sure to get audience’s pulses racing with anticipation for next year. Yet away from the marketing hype, pre-release publicity and away from the A-List names there are a slew of movies that, whilst not overly commercially minded, look like they may just be delightful. Some might be sleeper hits, some might not. Either way here is a list of 15 films, five each from the U.S., Asia and Europe, you may not have heard of to look out for next year:

The United States

The Fighter

Perhaps tainted by Christian Bale’s lost lustre or director David O. Russell’s reputation, The Fighter is receiving much less attention than I initially envisioned. Mark Wahlberg is to star in the lead role of professional boxer “Irish” Micky Ward with Bale as his half brother. The Fighter
See full article at Reel Loop »

2010 movie preview: 15 films you probably didn’t know you should be excited for

A few days back John made the rather excellent list of 15 films that are sure to get audience’s pulses racing with anticipation for next year. Yet away from the marketing hype, pre-release publicity and away from the A-List names there are a slew of movies that, whilst not overly commercially minded, look like they may just be delightful. Some might be sleeper hits, some might not. Either way here is a list of 15 films, five each from the U.S., Asia and Europe, you may not have heard of to look out for next year:

The United States

The Fighter

Perhaps tainted by Christian Bale’s lost lustre or director David O. Russell’s reputation, The Fighter is receiving much less attention than I initially envisioned. Mark Wahlberg is to star in the lead role of professional boxer “Irish” Micky Ward with Bale as his half brother. The Fighter
See full article at Reel Loop »

Asia going global by getting local

Asia going global by getting local
Hong Kong -- Foreign-language Oscar winner "Departures" is a perfect example of how Asian cinema quickly is becoming more local and more successful at the same time.

The region's film institutions still fret about overseas perception of their industries and hold endless think-tanks about how to break into the U.S. market. But in many ways, the film world is turning to Asia anyway, as those economies have emerged from recession faster than the West and Hollywood studios and indies from the rest of the world have scrambled to join in.

With a few days left of 2009 and final numbers still to crystallize, boxoffice in East Asia looks strong. China in particular appears to have delivered a growth number -- 25% to 30% -- typical of a developing economy, but on a scale that now puts it in the global top 10 territories. South Korea
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Lu Chuan Goes Period with 鸿门宴 (The Hongmen Banquet)

With only three films in the can, and three quite varied and eclectic ones at that (a black comedy, a Tibet-themed quasi-documentary, and a gritty and poignant portrait of the Nanjing Massacre), Lu Chuan has quickly become one of the most important voices in current Mainland Cinema. Right as his latest, masterful 南京! 南京! (City of Life and Death) is still garnering praise around the world, the son of renowned novelist Lu Tianming has already announced his next project, and we're dealing with an interesting concept, not to mention his first venture into bonafide historical drama.

Starlight International and China Film are in fact set to produce 鸿门宴 (The Hongmen Banquet) - title is just a direct translation - which will tell the story of one of Chinese history' most famous nights, when general Xiang Yu and future Han Dynasty founder Liu Bang met on a fateful night, filled with intrigue,
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Huang Jianxin's Back To Back, Face To Face (1994) review

(Though he's now (indirectly) best known in the West for The Founding of a Republic making the Prc very large sums of money, director Huang Jianxin remains one of Chinese cinema's best-kept secrets. For more than twenty years he's been making films documenting the vagaries of contemporary life on the mainland, the best of them richly detailed, funny, intelligent and thoughtful, but outside of a few festival appearances and academic citations he's gone largely unrecognised outside his domestic market. In the hope of pointing out he's done quite a bit more than co-direct one of the highest profile works of propaganda ever conceived, here's some of his work that deserves more attention.)

Hell hath no fury like a civil servant spurned, apparently. In 1994's Back to Back, Face to Face, Huang Jianxin explores the lengths a minor functionary ends up going to in order to make life miserable for everyone who's ever wronged him.
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

City Of Life And Death and Lebanon Among Batch of 69 Picks for Golden Globes Foreign Category

This year, voting members will have to cover 69 picks, and slim it down to a neat five nominations and among the titles worth mentioning that didn't receive a possibility at an Oscar nomination we have City Of Life And Death and Lebanon. Unfortunately, even this list is imperfect as there is no mention of titles that were big with critics such as Women Without Men, I am Love, Hadewijch. - The Golden Globes do things a little differently than the Oscars when it comes time narrowing down the absolute best in foreign language cinema. The Hollywood Foreign press do without the politics of one film per country quota, which is great when a smaller nation has a stellar year with at least two worthwhile mentions, and just makes sense for the France film industry who on average, give several reasons to appreciate the 7th art. This year, voting members will have to cover 69 picks,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Strand Offer Refuge to Gallenberger's 'John Rabe'

Adding to their collection of films picked off from Berlin, Strand Releasing have acquired the U.S. rights to Florian Gallenberger's John Rabe - a big budget German feature that looks at the Nanjing massacre of 37-38 from a Schindler's List perspective. - Adding to their collection of films picked off from Berlin, Strand Releasing have acquired the U.S. rights to Florian Gallenberger's John Rabe - a big budget German feature that looks at the Nanjing massacre of 37-38 from a Schindler's List perspective. Winner of a four awards at the Golden Lolas (Germany's Academy Awards), this will be a perfect compliment/companion piece to the 2010 release of Lu Chaun's City of Life and Death. Strand is planning a Spring release. With popular Germans thesps Ulrich Tukur and Daniel Bruhl on board, this is a story about a German businessman who saved more than 200,000 Chinese during the massacre.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

IndieWIRE Critic's Poll: What are A Serious Man's Oscar Chances?

Have Joel and Ethan Coen followed up No Country for Old Men with another Oscar winner? A clear favorite (I've got my hand up) among the film critics and bloggers polled by IndieWIRE, A Serious Man might have a big and bright future ahead of it and as Eugene points out, "the Coens latest took top honors as Toronto’s best narrative film, finding a place on nearly every single ballot. - Have Joel and Ethan Coen followed up No Country for Old Men with another Oscar winner? A clear favorite (I've got my hand up) among the film critics and bloggers polled by IndieWIRE, A Serious Man might have a big and bright future ahead of it and as Eugene points out, "the Coens latest took top honors as Toronto’s best narrative film, finding a place on nearly every single ballot. Other category winners include: Erik Gandini
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Golden Globes 2010: Best Foreign Language Film Longlist

Ulrich Tukur in John Rabe (top); City of Life and Death (middle); Lebanon (bottom) A record 69 foreign language films are in the running for the 2010 Golden Globes, Philip Berk, president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, has announced. Among the films in the longlist are Pedro Almodóvar’s Broken Embraces, starring Penelope Cruz; Costa-Gavras socially conscious drama Eden Is West; Xavier Dolan’s I Killed My Mother, one of the Toronto Film Festival’s best Canadian films of the year; and Marco Bellocchio’s Vincere, about Mussolini’s first wife (Giovanna Mezzogiorno) and child (Filippo Timi). Some of the titles, e.g., A Prophet, The White Ribbon, are also in the running for the best foreign language film Academy Award. Some have already won [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Golden Horse Awards: Maggie Cheung, Ang Lee, Leon Dai, Tsai Ming-liang

Maggie Cheung alert!

She walked the Taiwanese red carpet today in this white number to your left. She was presenting Best Picture at the Golden Horse Awards. The Golden Horse is Taiwanese in origin but it's for Chinese language films regardless of country of origin so it's very competitive now. Warlords and Lust, Caution, which both had international releases, were recent winners of Best Picture.

This year, Maggie handed the trophy to No Puedo Vivir Sin Ti which, if we ever see it in the States, might be called I Can't Live Without You or Not Without You. That's Taiwan's submission for this year's Foreign Language Film Oscar race. The film is from actor/director Leon Dai and it's about a poor man who loses his daughter once the government learns of their illegal living conditions.

No Puedo Vivir Sin Ti (2009) from Taiwan

Winners

Best Picture: No Puedo Vivir Sin Ti

Best Director: Leon Dai,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Asia-Pacific Screen Awards 2009

2009 Asia-Pacific Screen Awards 2009 Asia-Pacific Screen Award winners: Australia’s Gold Coast on Nov 26. 2009 ("*" denotes the winner in each category) Writer-director Warwick Thornton’s Samson & Delilah, Australia’s submission for the 2010 best foreign-language film Academy Award, took best film honors at the 3rd Asia-Pacific Screen Awards held in Queensland, Australia. Samson & Delilah tells the story of two young aborigines (Rowan McNamara, Marissa Gibson) who flee their village in the Australian desert; the problem is: they have nowhere to go. Thornton’s drama has also been nominated for 13 Australian Film Institute Awards. Best Feature Film * Samson & Delilah – Australia Produced by Kath Shelper Forever Enthralled People’s Republic of China Produced by Han Sanping and Du Jiayi City of Life and Death [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Best Asian Film of 2009 is…

We have been treated to an absolutely fantastic year in terms of Asian movies. Not only have we had splendid art house movies such as Like You Know It All and Love Exposure, but we've also had the weird and wonderful in Yatterman and of course the first attempt by Korea at taking on the vampire movie genre with the excellent Thirst. Its also been a return to form for Hong Kong movies, such as Accident, City of Life and Death and Overheard. Its not just the usual movie producing nations which have been producing classics either, we've also seen incredbile movies from Taiwan, Thailand and the Philippines. We have finally come down to the top 8 movies this year from an original list of over 30 movies from various Asian countries.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Latest MPAA Ratings: Bulletin No: 2094

Here are the new MPAA ratings from Bulletin No: 2094.

$5 A Day Rated PG-13 For sexual content, brief nudity and language. Bad Lieutenant Port Of Call New Orleans Rated R For drug use and language throughout, some violence and sexuality. Release Date: November 20, 2009 City Of Life And Death Rated R For wartime violence and atrocities including sexual assault, and for some sexuality and brief nudity. The Donner Party Rated R For some violence. Frozen Rated R For some disturbing images and language. Hidden Rated R For violence, disturbing images and language. The Joneses Rated R For language, some sexual content, teen drinking and drug use. Let God Be The Judge Rated PG For thematic elements, language and violence. The Lovely Bones Rated PG-13 For mature thematic material involving disturbing violent content and images, and some language. Release Date: December 11, 2009 Perfect Life Rated R For drug use throughout, sexuality, violence, and pervasive language.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

MPAA ratings: Nov. 4, 2009

MPAA ratings: Nov. 4, 2009. The following feature-length motion pictures have been reviewed and rated by the Classification and Rating Administration pursuant to the Motion Picture Classification and Rating program. Each of the designated ratings is defined as follows under the Motion Picture Classification and Rating program.

G -- General Audiences. All ages admitted.

PG -- Parental Guidance Suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

PG -13 --Parents Strongly Cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

R -- Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Nc-17 -- No One 17 And Under Admitted.

Film Distributor Reason Rating $5 A Day

Image Entertainment, Inc.

Rated for sexual content, brief nudity and language.

PG-13 Bad Lieutenant Port of Call New Orleans

Lieutenant Productions, Inc. - [Production Co.]

Rated for drug use and language throughout, some violence and sexuality.

R City of Life and Death

National Geographic Entertainment/Cinema Ventures

Rated for wartime violence and atrocities including sexual assault,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

AFI Fest 2009: Precious, The White Ribbon, Ajami

Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire by Lee Daniels (top); The White Ribbon by Michael Haneke (middle); Giovanna Mezzogiorno, Filippo Timi in Vincere by Marco Bellocchio (bottom) Among the Sunday, Nov. 1, highlights at the AFI Fest 2009 at the Chinese Theater complex in Hollywood are: Lu Chuan’s historical drama City of Life and Death, winner of the Golden Shell for best picture at the San Sebastian Film Festival Claude Chabrol’s psychological mystery-drama Bellamy, his first collaboration with Gérard Depardieu Lee Daniels‘ Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire, a strong possibility for the Oscar 2010 best picture shortlist and the Sundance 2009 Us Narrative Jury Prize winner Michael Haneke’s Palme d’Or winner and potential Oscar 2010 contender [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The blogs of my blog

One of my favorite pastimes, especially when I should be doing something else, is moseying around the blogs of my readers. You may have noticed that when the name of a poster is displayed in blue, that means it's a link -- usually to the author's blog, although you might be surprised. Assembled here is a distinctive readership of interesting people, not least because I am vigilant about never posting idiotic or perfunctory comments. A certain civil tone is (usually) maintained, avoiding the plague of flame wars.

More than a year ago, when the blog was somewhat new to me, I wrote: "Your comments have provided me with the best idea of my readers that I have ever had, and you are the readers I have dreamed of. I was writing to you before I was sure you were there. You are thoughtful, engaged, fair, and often the authors of eloquent prose.
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

“Life and Death,” “Precious” Top San Sebastian Winners

The 57th San Sebastian International Film Festival came to a close this weekend, with Lu Chuan’s “City of Life and Death” topping the jury prizes by winning the fest’s Golden Shell for best film. The film - a dramatization of the rape of Nanking in 1937 - also earned a prize for Cao Yu’s cinematography, and took home the fest’s Signis award (presented by the World Catholic Association For Communication). Other …
See full article at Indiewire »

'Life and Death' tops San Sebastian fest

'Life and Death' tops San Sebastian fest
San Sebastian -- Lu Chuan's controversial Chinese film "City of Life and Death," depicting the atrocities committed during the 1938 Japanese siege of China's former capital, Nanjing, won the Golden Shell Saturday at the 57th San Sebastian International Film Festival.

Spain's Javier Rebollo picked up the best directing award for his "Woman Without Piano," portraying the alienation of a Madrid housewife on the threshold of menopause.

The Silver Shell acting awards went to Spanish actors Lola Duenas and Pablo Pineda for their central performances in Alvaro Pastor and Antonio Naharro's "Me Too," focusing on a man with Down syndrome and his efforts to woo a woman without. Pineda is the first Down's sufferer to get a university degree in Europe.

Philippe Van Leeuw's look at the Rwandan massacre "The Day God Walked Away" won the coveted Kutxa-New Directors Award worth 90,000 euros to be equally divided between the director and the Spanish distributor.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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