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Paddington (2014)

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2:35 | Trailer

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A young Peruvian bear travels to London in search of a home. Finding himself lost and alone at Paddington Station, he meets the kindly Brown family, who offer him a temporary haven.

Director:

Paul King

Writers:

Paul King, Hamish McColl (screen story by) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
1,585 ( 24)
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 3 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tim Downie ... Montgomery Clyde
Madeleine Worrall Madeleine Worrall ... Agatha Clyde
Lottie Steer ... Young Millicent
Geoffrey Palmer ... Head Geographer
Theresa Watson Theresa Watson ... Stenographer
Imelda Staunton ... Aunt Lucy (voice)
Michael Gambon ... Uncle Pastuzo (voice)
Ben Whishaw ... Paddington (voice)
Hugh Bonneville ... Henry Brown
Sally Hawkins ... Mary Brown
Madeleine Harris Madeleine Harris ... Judy Brown
Samuel Joslin ... Jonathan Brown
Michael Bond ... Kindly Gentleman
Matt Lucas ... Joe
Julie Walters ... Mrs. Bird
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Storyline

A young Peruvian bear with a passion for all things British travels to London in search of a home. Finding himself lost and alone at Paddington Station, he begins to realize that city life is not all he had imagined - until he meets the kind Brown family, who read the label around his neck ('Please look after this bear. Thank you.') and offer him a temporary haven. It looks as though his luck has changed until this rarest of bears catches the eye of a museum taxidermist. Written by Marmalade Films

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Adventure Begins See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild action and rude humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Country:

UK | France | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 January 2015 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Paddington Bear See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$55,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£5,191,930 (United Kingdom), 30 November 2014, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$25,205,000, 18 January 2015, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$76,223,578, 18 June 2015

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$259,541,430, 18 June 2015
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the second film where Hugh Bonneville has raced across West London in a car as a precursor to the final scene. The first being Notting Hill (1999). See more »

Goofs

When Paddington is a stowaway in the lifeboat, his only suitcase opens to show 15 jars of marmalade. After the second cut of the discard pile, there are considerably more than 15 empty jars. See more »

Quotes

Paddington: Mrs Brown says that in London everyone is different, and that means anyone can fit in. I think she must be right - because although I don't look like anyone else, I really do feel at home. I'll never be like other people, but that's alright, because I'm a bear. A bear called Paddington.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The last few seconds of the Heyday Films logo has it turned the quality of a old movie projector to dissolve to the prologue with the explorer's film. See more »

Connections

Version of Paddington Bear (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

London Is The Place for Me
Performed by D Lime featuring Tobago Crusoe
Words and Music by Dennis Preston, Aldwin Roberts and Edmundo Ros (C) 1951
Published by EMI Music Publishing Ltd. / Peter Maurice Music Co. Ltd
Recorded by Stephen Sedgwick
Assisted by John Foyle and Kristian Donaldson
Recorded at Studio 13
Produced by Electric Wave Bureau
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User Reviews

 
A Thoroughly Enjoyable Family Movie
2 May 2015 | by Blake PetersonSee all my reviews

"I LIKE THE BEAR," a little girl exclaimed behind me during the first few minutes of Paddington. The delighted reaction took me by surprise, and then it turned into a reminder. The farther I drift away from childhood, the longer I avoid interacting with elementary-aged children, there is a tendency to forget that there is such a thing as kids movies and family movies. I saw The LEGO Movie with my dad, true, but even then, it felt like I was watching a slightly sanitized version of The Simpsons instead of a reprehensible Pixar knockoff.

These days, family movies try as hard as they can to appeal to the kiddos and their parents; maybe executives know how excruciating it can be to sit through a particularly painful foray into baby-talk and recycled jokes. Though it isn't my personal favorite genre, it is undeniable that family films please more routinely than any other category in film. So much emphasis is put onto each project that it's rare to find a stinker among the handful.

But most children's films are only good, entertaining for the time being but not packed with enough quality to have an impact for more than a few months. Imagine my surprise when Paddington went from 0 to 60, straight into my cynical heart. Paddington is far too marvelous to throw around the effective cliché that it has something for the kids and something for the adults; like Babe, The Muppets, and yes, even Frozen, it transcends our prejudiced assumptions and takes us inside a fairy tale where anything can happen. It doesn't matter what age we are; it is as if you could throw dust into the air, only to find it fall in a golden flurry. Paddington shouldn't work, but it does. It does so well, in fact, that I can say with full confidence that it is one of the best genre films of the decade.

Paddington the Bear is already a beloved literary figure, of course, but when we first meet him in his own star vehicle, it is as though he is new again. As the film begins, we find him living in Darkest, Peru with his aunt and uncle (Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon), both of whom are marmalade obsessed and intelligent enough to speak in cultured British accents. The film explains this noteworthy phenomenon: decades earlier, an explorer arrived in Peru, and, smitten with the bears otherworldly craftiness, taught them how to act as if they were civilized human beings.

After tragedy strikes, Paddington's aunt decides that it would be best if her nephew went to find a home in London. When he arrives at a train station, most disregard his exuberant politeness, but not Mrs. Brown (Sally Hawkins). Her family looks at him with differing levels of judgment, especially her husband (Hugh Bonneville), but the Brown's pity him, eventually deciding to take him in.

Paddington may have inimitable manners, but he surely isn't gifted when it comes to gracefulness (in a hilariously mounted comedic sequence, Paddington discovers the joys of the family bathroom, only to flood the entire house). Most would give him up, but with his considerable charm to make up for his klutziness, he even wins over Mr. Brown. But just as things begin to look up into storybook heaven, Millicent Clyde (a scene- stealing Nicole Kidman) enters the scene, a blood-thirsty taxidermist who wants nothing more than to stuff Paddington for her latest exhibit.

With its candy-colored imagery and bouncy humor, Paddington is impossible to resist, a feature that really and truly makes you relive the glorious innocence of childhood. Voiced by the genial Ben Whishaw, Paddington is a fluffy friend for the ages, more cuddly and comical than Despicable Me's famed Minions. The CGI used to flesh him out is so convincing that every single strand of fur sticks out with remarkable detail; there were times I forgot that Paddington is an outright miracle of animation, not a real-life talent I could meet on the red carpet.

There you have it. Paddington doesn't need an analysis, nor does it need a critic to highlight how much of a wonder it is. It is an unusually magical and unusually well-crafted family movie that needs to be watched immediately. Take you mom, take your dad, take your sister, take your brother — take anybody. Because, like the little girl who sat behind me during its extraordinary 95 minutes, I like the bear.

Read more reviews at petersonreviews.com


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