When Cecilia's abusive ex takes his own life and leaves her his fortune, she suspects his death was a hoax. As a series of coincidences turn lethal, Cecilia works to prove that she is being hunted by someone nobody can see.

Director:

Leigh Whannell

Writers:

Leigh Whannell (screenplay by), Leigh Whannell (screen story by)
Popularity
233 ( 17)
34 wins & 77 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Elisabeth Moss ... Cecilia Kass
Oliver Jackson-Cohen ... Adrian Griffin
Harriet Dyer ... Emily Kass
Aldis Hodge ... James Lanier
Storm Reid ... Sydney Lanier
Michael Dorman ... Tom Griffin
Benedict Hardie ... Marc (Architect)
Renee Lim ... Doctor Lee
Brian Meegan ... Lyft Driver
Nick Kici Nick Kici ... Taylor (Waiter)
Vivienne Greer ... Screaming Woman
Nicholas Hope ... Head Doctor
Cleave Williams ... Orderly
Cardwell Lynch Cardwell Lynch ... Police Officer
Sam Smith ... Detective Reckley
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Storyline

The film follows Cecilia, who receives the news of her abusive ex-boyfriend's suicide. She begins to re-build her life for the better. However, her sense of reality is put into question when she begins to suspect her deceased lover is not actually dead. Written by Max

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

What You Can't See Can Hurt You


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some strong bloody violence, and language. | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Whannell and his crew used a combination of old-school techniques and state-of-the-art CGI wizardry to bring the Invisible Man to life, with some scenes requiring a fully-green-suited actor that could be painted out later and others achieved with nothing more than a simple bit of string. "Well with, say, the fight scenes, that was a real mixture of things," Whannell said. "We had Lizzie being pulled around in wires. We had a stunt person in a green suit, who then had to be removed digitally. "But then also in those scenes we would also use really old school practical effects like pulling doors closed with a piece of string. Some props guy would be hidden in a cabinet, and he would pull this piece of string and a door would close or a cabinet would open. It made you realise that how you do a visual effect doesn't matter - it's only the end result that matters." See more »

Goofs

She has money, but stays vulnerable and often alone rather than hire protection.

This was needed for thrills, but no effort was made to justify or explain it. See more »

Quotes

Adrian Griffin: You think you're learning how to beat me, so I'm going to truly teach you something. If you fight me, I won't ever hurt you. I'll find someone you love and hurt them instead. Now you've only got yourself to blame for that innocent young girl's death.
Cecilia Kass: No, please! Not Sydney. Adrian, no.
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Crazy Credits

The Universal Pictures logo appears in silence. See more »

Alternate Versions

The UK version was cut to secure a 15 certificate, by removing 3s of bloody injury detail in a scene of self-harm. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 20 Horror Movie Plot Twists (2020) See more »

Soundtracks

Lost in Thought
Composers: Jim Copperthwaite (as James Copperthwaite), John Cameron, Oliver Vessey (as Oliver James Vessey)
Publishers: KPM Music Ltd and EMI Music Publishing Libraries
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User Reviews

 
Barely just "okay"
28 February 2020 | by smysterymanSee all my reviews

The Invisible Man ... hmmmm. Well, it wasn't awful, but it wasn't great. I still don't understand what house she went to, her relationship with the two people that live there, and why it never occurs to her to use the camera on her phone to record video for evidence.

In today's world, films really need to go out of their way to explain a LACK of smartphone use. They are so prevalent that NOT using them is a plot hole, and not a small one. It really kind of irritates me.

There is one legit good jump scare and some good tense moments. But for the most part it just feels like a real wasted opportunity.

I hate to say it, but Hollow Man did it better.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Canada | Australia | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 February 2020 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Untitled Universal Monster Project See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$28,205,665, 1 March 2020

Gross USA:

$70,410,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$143,151,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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