In Tuscany to promote his latest book, a middle-aged British writer meets a French woman who leads him to the village of Lucignano. While there, a chance question reveals something deeper.

Director:

Abbas Kiarostami

Writers:

Abbas Kiarostami, Caroline Eliacheff (collaborating writer)
10 wins & 28 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Juliette Binoche ... Elle
William Shimell ... James Miller
Jean-Claude Carrière ... L'homme de la place
Agathe Natanson Agathe Natanson ... La femme de la place
Gianna Giachetti Gianna Giachetti ... La patronne du café
Adrian Moore Adrian Moore ... Le fils
Angelo Barbagallo Angelo Barbagallo ... Le traducteur
Andrea Laurenzi Andrea Laurenzi ... Le guide
Filippo Trojano Filippo Trojano ... Le marié (as Filippo Troiano)
Manuela Balsimelli Manuela Balsimelli ... La mariée (as Manuela Balsinelli)
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Storyline

James Miller has just written a book on the value of a copy versus the original work of art. At a book reading, a woman gives him her address, and the next day they meet and take a country-side drive to a local Italian village. Here, they discuss various works of art found in the town, and also the nature of their relationship - which gets both more revealed and concealed as the day progresses. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kiarostami is normally known for making films with amateur actors and almost no budget, but said he had no difficulties in making the transition to European cinema: "This was the simplest film for me to work on-even more simple than the work I've done on my shorts, because I was working with a professional team both in front of and behind the camera." He also noted how he for once felt free to express whatever he wanted in the film. See more »

Quotes

James Miller: It seems to me that the human race is the only species who have forgotten the whole purpose of life, the whole meaning of existence is to have fun, to have pleasure. And here is someone who's found their own way to do it. We shouldn't judge them for it. If they're happy and enjoying life, we should congratulate them, not criticize them.
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Connections

Featured in Ebert Presents: At the Movies: Episode #1.10 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

O surdato 'nnamurrato
Written by Aniello Califano (as A. Califano) and the music by Enrico Cannio (as E. Cannio)
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User Reviews

 
My 379th Review: Neither loved it or hated it: more intrigued
3 March 2011 | by inteleartsSee all my reviews

All reviewers so far have either opted for 8 or 2. That is a sure sign that something is going on, I am willing to risk flack from all sides and say that Cerified Copy is was it is: a look at how we layer our relationships, an hour and forty minutes of conversations, broken with moments of silence and walking, and about two people who may or may not be in a some sort of relationship or connection.

It has originality - it will not be like other films seen recently in mainstream European cinema, there is little or no plot, or action, rather we dealing with conversation, and the state of the heart and the mind in a fiercely non-Hollywood fashion. This is a film about thinking about emotions, and is almost non-linear in its conversations and if that concept doesn't appeal then it may well not be viewable.

It is, however, despite itself, pretty mesmerizing - what will they say next? what other aspect of why relationships fail and succeed will be tossed into the salad? who are they? why the games? etc;

The conversations are both alienating and intimate, and have a "play-acting" aspect that allows the psychosexual aspect of how we adults explore potentiality to be examined in a way that is normally reduced to sexual tension and flirting on film. This is a film that demands attention - this is not dumb film-making. I recognize the conversations and the feeling well, but in a sense the connection is too contrived to be really successful - but it certainly touches that part of intimacy that is normally, at best, ethereal.

The setting of Chianti and a beautiful hot summer day, with cicadas and a wonderful small town to explore, lightens this - but it remains a film for philosopher romantics. It is, as others here have noted in better ways than me, film as film - here there are images and shots that work to compliment the alienation and solipsistic nature of the two leads.

A film about questions that offers few answers, it is certainly intriguing and if you are into human exploration and condition worth the effort to watch.


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Details

Country:

France | Italy | Belgium | Iran

Language:

French | English | Italian

Release Date:

25 March 2011 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Certified Copy See more »

Filming Locations:

Cortona, Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

EUR7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$77,937, 13 March 2011

Gross USA:

$1,373,975

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$7,736,632
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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