7.5/10
74,345
222 user 371 critic

Selma (2014)

Trailer
2:32 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

A chronicle of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s campaign to secure equal voting rights via an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews
Popularity
3,872 ( 72)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 58 wins & 88 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
... Coretta Scott King
... Gunnar Jahn
... Girl #1
Mikeria Howard ... Girl #2
... Girl #3
Ebony Billups ... Girl #4
... Girl #5 (as Nadej Bailey)
Elijah Oliver ... Boy #1
... Annie Lee Cooper
Clay Chappell ... Registrar
... President Lyndon B. Johnson
... Lee White
... President's Secretary
... Andrew Young
Edit

Storyline

The unforgettable true story chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition. The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement. Director Ava DuVernay's "Selma" tells the story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr and his brothers and sisters in the movement prompted change that forever altered history. Written by Miss W J Mcdermott

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

One dream can change the world. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing thematic material including violence, a suggestive moment, and brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

9 January 2015 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Selma: El poder de un sueño  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$633,173, 2 January 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$52,076,908

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$66,787,908
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

After Lee Daniels left the project, David Oyelowo campaigned for Ava DuVernay to take over as director. See more »

Goofs

When the police begin attacking the marchers at the bridge, the film depicts the event being broadcast live around the country. At the time, the event would've been filmed and shown later, after processing. Live news started many years later. See more »

Quotes

Martin Luther King Jr.: We need your involvement here, Mr. President. We deserve your help as citizens of this country. Citizens under attack.
President Lyndon B. Johnson: Now, you listen to me. You listen to me. You're an activist. I'm a politician. You got one big issue. I got a hundred and one.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Martin Sheen is not listed in the credits. See more »


Soundtracks

I Got the New World In My View
Performed by Sister Gertrude Morgan
Courtesy of Big Deal Music on behalf of Preservation Hall
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
A movie-of-the-week.
30 January 2015 | by See all my reviews

Selma is a movie-of-the-week that didn't have to be. That an African-American woman, Ava DuVernay, directed this story is surely praiseworthy and a long time coming, but one wishes she'd realized the picture with more subtle strokes. Yes, there are a handful of beautifully poignant moments, some unspoken, but those are nearly neutralized by scenes where the dialog is so stilted with the weight of self-importance that ordinary folks sound like they're making speeches during private conversations.

Visually, the desaturated sepia look of the picture confuses. Are we watching a historical document, or are we present in the moment of 1965 with its arguably more vibrant palette? Superimposed FBI logbook entries (as scene headers) cheapen the movie and bring to mind 1970s televised crime drama. In these and other production decisions, DuVernay undermines her own noble effort.

Nevertheless, the story does move, and the inevitable violence that pushes forward the Voting Rights Act is brutal and affecting. The film's best moments come from Henry G. Sanders as Cager Lee, and between David Oyelowo and Tom Wilkinson as MLK and LBJ.


16 of 26 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 222 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed