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A chronicle of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s campaign to secure equal voting rights via an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965.

Director:

Ava DuVernay

Writer:

Paul Webb
Reviews
Popularity
2,777 ( 765)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 58 wins & 88 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David Oyelowo ... Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Carmen Ejogo ... Coretta Scott King
Jim France ... Gunnar Jahn
Trinity Simone ... Girl #1
Mikeria Howard Mikeria Howard ... Girl #2
Jordan Rice ... Girl #3
Ebony Billups Ebony Billups ... Girl #4
Nadej K. Bailey ... Girl #5 (as Nadej Bailey)
Elijah Oliver Elijah Oliver ... Boy #1
Oprah Winfrey ... Annie Lee Cooper
Clay Chappell Clay Chappell ... Registrar
Tom Wilkinson ... President Lyndon B. Johnson
Giovanni Ribisi ... Lee White
Haviland Stillwell ... President's Secretary
André Holland ... Andrew Young
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Storyline

The unforgettable true story chronicles the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition. The epic march from Selma to Montgomery culminated in President Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the most significant victories for the civil rights movement. Director Ava DuVernay's "Selma" tells the story of how the revered leader and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr and his brothers and sisters in the movement prompted change that forever altered history. Written by Miss W J Mcdermott

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The gripping story of Martin Luther King Jr's historic struggle for equality. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing thematic material including violence, a suggestive moment, and brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK | USA | France

Language:

English

Release Date:

9 January 2015 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Selma: El poder de un sueño See more »

Filming Locations:

Marietta, Georgia, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$633,173, 2 January 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$52,076,908

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$66,787,908
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie's title comes from the name of the city, Selma, in Alabama, which is the starting place of the historic voting rights march shown in the movie. See more »

Goofs

Martin Luther King replaces a transparent plastic trash bag. In 1965, home garbage cans were lined with a paper shopping bag, if at all. See more »

Quotes

Andrew Young: Hey, what you need guns for?
Angry Marcher: The Bible says an eye for an eye, reverend.
Andrew Young: Yeah?
Angry Marcher: I'm sick of this shit!
Andrew Young: How many guns you think they got down there? That's an entire army down there. What you got? A couple of .32s? A .38? Maybe a couple of old scatterguns? What?
Angry Marcher: I got enough to kill a couple of them crackers, that's what I got!
Andrew Young: And how many of us you think they gonna kill in retaliation? With their 12-gauge pump-actions, their Colt automatics, their Remingtons, their helicopters, their tanks! We ...
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Crazy Credits

Apart from the production companies involved, there are no opening credits. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Middle: Risky Business (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Why (Am I Treated So Bad)
Written by Roebuck 'Pops' Staples (as Roebuck Staples)
Performed by The Staple Singers
Courtesy of Columbia Records
By arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Captivating Portrayal of the Civil Rights Leader and Intensely Moving Story
23 January 2015 | by valen060See all my reviews

The words I best describe this movie are "profound" and "intense." From what I've learned since my school days, equal rights among race was a very touchy subject when it came to American history.

David Oyelowo's portrayal of Martin Luther King Jr. was so spot-on that I was immediately drawn in to see every detail of the film play out. I was disturbed and further curious at the same time amongst every scene that unfolded during the key moments of the film.

Basically, it featured how much King sacrificed and went through in the 1960s to maintain blacks rights to vote and eliminate segregation from all states. I couldn't believe how much violent injustice and racial discrimination were used to intimidate innocent people who were trying to have the same rights like many in America.

Oprah Winfrey, Cuba Gooding Jr, and rapper-actor Common brought out great performances as the individuals who stood up for what they truly believe in and they wouldn't let hate stand in their way. Tom Wilkinson's portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson was rather physically uncanny and his scenes brought out the angst of what he had to face at a time when violence was further escalating during the Civil Rights Movement. Tim Roth as Governor George Wallace made me feel to hate the man for his segregationist beliefs, but when confronted by President Johnson himself, it just got real.

The juxtaposition of real-life archive footage in the movie gave a nice touch to how very genuine these people of Selma endured plenty of horrible confrontations. Whether these usually ended in violence or even death, they just kept growing in numbers and overcome all who stood against their true beliefs in racial equality.

My only nitpick was that of President Johnson's confrontations with Martin Luther King himself. I've learned in the history books that they've had their fair share of disagreements, but nothing this intense as shown on screen. Nevertheless, it proved that being an American President was no easy feat at a very difficult time. Overall, this is a film that didn't require lengthy (moving) MLK speeches, instead it focused on tense confrontations black people had to endure and how one individual stood tall and fought back not with violence, but with powerful words and strong beliefs. I applaud David Oyelowo and director Ava DuVernay for providing a glimpse into how racism was overcome by one profound man whose legacy still reverberates to this day.


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