8.2/10
1,163,056
1,503 user 647 critic

The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

Trailer
2:33 | Trailer
Based on the true story of Jordan Belfort, from his rise to a wealthy stock-broker living the high life to his fall involving crime, corruption and the federal government.

Director:

Martin Scorsese

Writers:

Terence Winter (screenplay), Jordan Belfort (book)
Popularity
83 ( 11)
Top Rated Movies #141 | Nominated for 5 Oscars. Another 38 wins & 173 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Leonardo DiCaprio ... Jordan Belfort
Jonah Hill ... Donnie Azoff
Margot Robbie ... Naomi Lapaglia
Matthew McConaughey ... Mark Hanna
Kyle Chandler ... Agent Patrick Denham
Rob Reiner ... Max Belfort
Jon Bernthal ... Brad
Jon Favreau ... Manny Riskin
Jean Dujardin ... Jean Jacques Saurel
Joanna Lumley ... Aunt Emma
Cristin Milioti ... Teresa Petrillo
Christine Ebersole ... Leah Belfort
Shea Whigham ... Captain Ted Beecham
Katarina Cas ... Chantalle
P.J. Byrne ... Nicky Koskoff ('Rugrat')
Edit

Storyline

In the early 1990s, Jordan Belfort teamed with his partner Donny Azoff and started brokerage firm Stratford-Oakmont. Their company quickly grows from a staff of 20 to a staff of more than 250 and their status in the trading community and Wall Street grows exponentially. So much that companies file their initial public offerings through them. As their status grows, so do the amount of substances they abuse, and so do their lies. They draw attention like no other, throwing lavish parties for their staff when they hit the jackpot on high trades. That ultimately leads to Belfort featured on the cover of Forbes Magazine, being called "The Wolf Of Wall St.". With the FBI onto Belfort's trading schemes, he devises new ways to cover his tracks and watch his fortune grow. Belfort ultimately comes up with a scheme to stash their cash in a European bank. But with the FBI watching him like a hawk, how long will Belfort and Azoff be able to maintain their elaborate wealth and luxurious lifestyles? Written by halo1k

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

More is never enough See more »

Genres:

Biography | Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sequences of strong sexual content, graphic nudity, drug use and language throughout, and for some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Matthew McConaughey's scenes were shot on the second week of filming. The chest beating and humming performed by him was improvised and actually a warm-up rite that he performs before acting. When Leonardo DiCaprio saw it while filming, the brief shot of him looking away uneasily from the camera was actually him looking at Martin Scorsese for approval. DiCaprio encouraged them to include it in their scene and later claimed it "set the tone" for the rest of the film. See more »

Goofs

According to Belfort, he did not back out of his deal with the SEC, and his "they will have to call in the National Guard" speech never happened. See more »

Quotes

Jordan Belfort: Oh my God! You had to deal with the Golf Course people too! What a greek tragedy! Honey oh my God!, you probably had to pay them in cash with your hands! What a fucking burden, and actually had to do some work besides swiping my fucking credit card all day? Huh? Cause I can't keep track of your professions honey! Last month you were a wine connoisseur, and now you're an aspiring landscape architect, Isn't that right?
Naomi Lapaglia: Fuck you!
Jordan Belfort: Don't you dare throw that fucking water on me! Don't you fucking dare!
See more »

Crazy Credits

The film opens with a Stratton Oakmont advertisement hosted by Jordan Belfort. The film title appears only at the ending. See more »

Alternate Versions

News reports in local media have said the version of the movie showing in Abu Dhabi cinemas removes 45 minutes of content. Aside from nudity and sexual situations, most of the edits come from the film's 600+ curse words. Time Out Abu Dhabi reported offensive language was removed by "either by muting the audio temporarily or chopping chunks from scenes mid sentence, which produces a jarring effect for viewers." See more »


Soundtracks

I Don't Want to Walk Without You
(from Popeye Meets Hercules (1948))
Written by Frank Loesser and Jule Styne
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
See more »

User Reviews

 
"Money is the oxygen of capitalism and I wanna breathe more than any other human being alive."
24 October 2018 | by notoriousCASKSee all my reviews

It's no surprise that Scorsese is associated with the gangster genre with films such as The Departed, Goodfellas and Casino, of which the last two are possibly the best pure examples of the genre. In Goodfellas the gangsters are dangerous but they operate on a more underground level, in Casino they practically run a major city and can do whatever they like. The gangsters were and will always be a part in America's system. Now, the gangsters are not just accepted by the system, but are considered to be an integral part of it. In the first two films, the gangster is threatening and dangerous, but avoidable. In The Wolf of Wall Street, he's calling to hustle you at home and you don't even know it. Some people view The Wolf of Wall Street as a glorification of Jordan Belfort's lifestyle and want to be like him, as Scorsese portrays this life by its nature, enticing. That's the way it works, and it's impossible to portray it accurately without showing how a charismatic man like Belfort can suck an unsuspecting person into a world of money and fame. The film though, shows us just how empty and destructive that life can be.

There is an undeniable similarity between the instantaneous joy, energy and euphoria that we have while watching The Wolf of Wall Street and how Jordan Belfort lives his life, this is a movie where the director skillfully mixes form and content to create an experience which is as hyper and as instantly ecstatic as the life of its flashy and opportunistic characters.

The direction by Martin Scorsese which still has infectious energy and power is impeccable, there is no other director who has mastered pacing like he has. This is a three-hour movie that moves lightning fast and always manages to keep the audience invested in the story throughout the whole duration. Each scene is packed with so much visual information, and it is fast paced and quickly edited, which complements the general tone of the film. The cinematography by Rodrigo Prieto is gorgeous as well and displays an optimal color palette throughout the whole film. Each shot also looks precise, even during some of the more chaotic scenes.

The script is fantastic, filled with many great and memorable lines of dialogue. Every character has a well-defined arc and motives, and the story is given proper breathing room to blossom. The performances are also exquisite, especially Leonardo DiCaprio who gives one of the best performances of his career and portrays the opportunistic nature of Jordan Belfort's character with great commitment as you can see a lustful, hedonistic and impulsive sex & drug-addict man who only wants to have more fun. Supporting him with equal passion is Jonah Hill as Donnie Azoff, Belfort's sidekick, and even he manages to make a mark of his own. Margot Robbie plays Naomi, Belfort's second wife and she does an alluring job in her given role. Matthew McConaughey is in for a very short duration as Mark Hanna, Belfort's mentor, but even in that little time, he is the show-stealer and he dominates the screen unlike anyone else.

Martin Scorsese and Terence Winter set out to create a film about the Wall Street excess, and by definition, it contains an excessive amount of everything, such as cursing, sex, nudity, drugs, alcohol and partying. But the film is not really about those things. The story of The Wolf of Wall Street boils down to money, that "most-addictive drug" Belfort speaks of, and not just what it can buy, but what it can do to people. Not just how it changes one's lifestyle but the effects it has on one's morals, beliefs, and values, and how it can effectively change not just how a person thinks and feels but how they operate at their core.

With a collection of truly incredible films, The Wolf of Wall Street stands out as one of Scorsese's best films, my personal favorite and by far his most humorous film to date. He truly went all out and it paid off in a hilarious satire on the reverence of money, drugs, women, and the admiration of a criminal money-maker. The Wolf of Wall Street is maddening cinema that's already high on coke but still continues to snort more white powder every 5 minutes for 3 hours. This is a fascinating vignette of excess, greed, abuse and decay and it's one of the best movies of the decade and surely one of the most entertaining movies ever made.


59 of 76 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 1,503 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

25 December 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Wolf of Wall Street See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$100,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,361,578, 29 December 2013

Gross USA:

$116,900,694

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$392,000,694
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut) | (rough cut)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

Everything That's New on Netflix in December

No need to waste time endlessly browsing—here's the entire lineup of new movies and TV shows streaming on Netflix this month.

See the full list



Recently Viewed