8.2/10
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The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

Trailer
2:33 | Trailer
Based on the true story of Jordan Belfort, from his rise to a wealthy stock-broker living the high life to his fall involving crime, corruption and the federal government.

Director:

Martin Scorsese

Writers:

Terence Winter (screenplay), Jordan Belfort (book)
Popularity
72 ( 7)
Top Rated Movies #141 | Nominated for 5 Oscars. Another 38 wins & 173 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Leonardo DiCaprio ... Jordan Belfort
Jonah Hill ... Donnie Azoff
Margot Robbie ... Naomi Lapaglia
Matthew McConaughey ... Mark Hanna
Kyle Chandler ... Agent Patrick Denham
Rob Reiner ... Max Belfort
Jon Bernthal ... Brad
Jon Favreau ... Manny Riskin
Jean Dujardin ... Jean Jacques Saurel
Joanna Lumley ... Aunt Emma
Cristin Milioti ... Teresa Petrillo
Christine Ebersole ... Leah Belfort
Shea Whigham ... Captain Ted Beecham
Katarina Cas ... Chantalle
P.J. Byrne ... Nicky Koskoff ('Rugrat')
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Storyline

In the early 1990s, Jordan Belfort teamed with his partner Donny Azoff and started brokerage firm Stratford-Oakmont. Their company quickly grows from a staff of 20 to a staff of more than 250 and their status in the trading community and Wall Street grows exponentially. So much that companies file their initial public offerings through them. As their status grows, so do the amount of substances they abuse, and so do their lies. They draw attention like no other, throwing lavish parties for their staff when they hit the jackpot on high trades. That ultimately leads to Belfort featured on the cover of Forbes Magazine, being called "The Wolf Of Wall St.". With the FBI onto Belfort's trading schemes, he devises new ways to cover his tracks and watch his fortune grow. Belfort ultimately comes up with a scheme to stash their cash in a European bank. But with the FBI watching him like a hawk, how long will Belfort and Azoff be able to maintain their elaborate wealth and luxurious lifestyles? Written by halo1k

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

More is never enough See more »

Genres:

Biography | Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sequences of strong sexual content, graphic nudity, drug use and language throughout, and for some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Leonardo DiCaprio says that he and Martin Scorsese were able to 'push the envelope' with their depiction of over-the-top sex, and 'make the movie they wanted to', primarily because the production was financed independently. Scorsese edited some sexual content and nudity to avoid an NC-17 rating at the request of the MPAA. See more »

Goofs

The candles that Jordan sets up on top of the mantle "to help with the fire" were already there in the previous shot. See more »

Quotes

Naomi Lapaglia: Wake up, you piece of shit! Who's Venice?
Jordan Belfort: Who?
Naomi Lapaglia: Huh?
Jordan Belfort: Who? Who?
Naomi Lapaglia: Who? What are you, a fucking owl? Who is she? Some little hooker you were fucking last night?
Jordan Belfort: What the fuck are you talking about? No. No way, baby, no!
Naomi Lapaglia: You were calling her name in your sleep!
Jordan Belfort: Are you out of your fucking mind? I don't even know who Venice is. What the fuck does that even mean? Venice. That's the stupidest shit I've ever heard in my fucking life!
[after flashback of sex with Venice]
Jordan Belfort: That's right. That's right, I forgot. ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The film opens with a Stratton Oakmont advertisement hosted by Jordan Belfort. The film title appears only at the ending. See more »

Alternate Versions

News reports in local media have said the version of the movie showing in Abu Dhabi cinemas removes 45 minutes of content. Aside from nudity and sexual situations, most of the edits come from the film's 600+ curse words. Time Out Abu Dhabi reported offensive language was removed by "either by muting the audio temporarily or chopping chunks from scenes mid sentence, which produces a jarring effect for viewers." See more »

Connections

Features Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Score
from Popeye Meets Hercules (1948)
Composed by Winston Sharples
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
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User Reviews

High energy and wonderfully excessive as it delivers an engaging true story, but the lack of morality anywhere was a limiting factor
17 January 2014 | by bob the mooSee all my reviews

This film arrived in the UK with awards and Oscar nominations all around it, adding an expectation which it really didn't need adding since even without any of that it is ultimately a Scorsese film with a big name cast. It also arrives with some other stuff because the film has been criticized for near glamorization of the excesses that Belfort was able to experience with his ill-gotten funds and, to be honest, it is an impression that isn't helped when you consider that this film was put forward to the Golden Globes in the Musical/Comedy section. Now I am sure that was a political move by the studio, but it does say something about the film because indeed for most of it we have stuff so unbelievable and so excessive that it is hard not to laugh at it. It is hard not to enjoy it.

And this is a problem, because the first 2 hours and a bit of this film is really engaging and enchanting in how much of a rush it gives you, how enticing it is and just how much vibrant energy it all has. The viewer is swept along and I guess to a point this is the film doing its job well because not only are we being told a story but we are first hand seeing how easy it is to get caught up in the grab for success, for money, for status. In this regard the film works really well because throughout the film I really was glad to be part of it and wanted it for myself; I don't think the film goes out of its way to glamorize this excess and this life, but for sure it doesn't do much to balance it – and this really is my problem with the film.

The structure, subjects and delivery of this film is so inherently similar to Goodfellas that it is hard not to mention it. If you remember the opening of Goodfellas you'll remember that it opens with a memorably violent scene where an near-dead man in the back of a car is stabbed by Hill and his colleagues in a scene that is oppressive and violent but yet ends with the narration telling us "as far back as I can remember I wanted to be a gangster" and snaps to credits under a big track from Tony Bennett. This scene is important because it works as a microcosm of the whole film – the appeal but also the cost, all in one place. Wolf of Wall Street never has any of that and it hurts it. I suspect the message of the film is that our financial systems are screwed and that ultimately the rich will never be in the same world as the average person, because this is what I took from the rather sobering final scenes. However if this is the point it is trying to make then it really hurts itself with the rest of the film seeming to say "so why not get on board". I know this is not the case but the lack of a "point" or an agenda it the film means that it naturally fills it with its own, which is a weird feeling.

But then again – I guess it is a comedy. So the infamous Quaalude scene is not horrific but rather hilarious, the scenes of excess and of criminality are not equally appealing and repulsive – they are almost totally appealing, we hardly get the other side or get to see a victim here, and a few seconds on the subway with the FBI agent really does nothing but yet again make the suggestion that "it's all broken so why not at least get rich yourself". Getting away from this, it is a well made film. Scorsese makes this award season's second film to owe a massive debt to Goodfellas (American Hustle being the other) and he directs the film with energy; music is used well as one would expect and the editing makes the film pop. DiCaprio is great in the lead – OK he doesn't find the heart of the character, but the film doesn't ask him to. Instead he is charismatic and energetic, drawing the viewer in and giving the film its energy. The supporting cast is deep with names and familiar faces and it is a statement about how well the film holds the viewer, because it isn't distracting no matter how many famous faces or supporting character from TV appear (although I did notice that this and American Hustle had lots of faces from HBO's Boardwalk Empire). Jonah Hill is over the top in a way that works, although I am surprised to see him getting an Oscar nomination for it in such a crowded year.

Wolf of Wall Street has had a lot of praise and this will continue as the Oscars approach and are awarded. Personally I enjoyed the film as a funny true story delivered with energy and excess but in many ways it is not Goodfellas and the most important of these is that the film lacks a moral core to itself, to its characters and to its message. I don't mind the "it's all screwed so who cares" message that it ultimately seems to give, but I didn't feel comfortable with how wide a smile it had on its face while it was delivering it.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

25 December 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Wolf of Wall Street See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$100,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,361,578, 29 December 2013

Gross USA:

$116,900,694

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$392,000,694
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (cut) | (rough cut)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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