Mary and Max (2009) - News Poster

(2009)

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Mad Max: Fury Road Named Best Australian Movie of This Century

Mad Max: Fury Road Named Best Australian Movie of This Century
Mad Max: Fury Road has been named the best Australian movie of the century. Recently, the Australian website Flicks.com surveyed a total of 51 critics from the country. 26 of whom were men and 25 women, making for a pretty even split and diverse group. It was the largest poll of Australian movie critics in history and, when all of the votes were tallied, director George Miller's dystopian masterpiece came out on top.

The Top five is rounded out by 2010's Animal Kingdom, 2009's Samson and Delilah, 2000's Chopper and 2001's Lantana. Sitting just outside the top five is the modern horror classic The Babadook, which was released in 2014 and gained notoriety for its originality and overall quality. Director Jennifer Kent has been in the running for several high-profile jobs, such as Captain Marvel. The 2001 musical Moulin Rouge, which was a major box office success and stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor,

Mad Max: Fury Road Named Best Australian Movie of This Century

Mad Max: Fury Road Named Best Australian Movie of This Century
Mad Max: Fury Road has been named the best Australian movie of the century. Recently, the Australian website Flicks.com surveyed a total of 51 critics from the country. 26 of whom were men and 25 women, making for a pretty even split and diverse group. It was the largest poll of Australian movie critics in history and, when all of the votes were tallied, director George Miller's dystopian masterpiece came out on top.

The Top five is rounded out by 2010's Animal Kingdom, 2009's Samson and Delilah, 2000's Chopper and 2001's Lantana. Sitting just outside the top five is the modern horror classic The Babadook, which was released in 2014 and gained notoriety for its originality and overall quality. Director Jennifer Kent has been in the running for several high-profile jobs, such as Captain Marvel. The 2001 musical Moulin Rouge, which was a major box office success and stars Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Chris Massey

You may remember Chris Massey from his role as Michael Barret from the popular teen’s show “Zoey 101.”He was a favorite on the Nickelodeon TV series. Chris also appeared in the series “That’s So Raven” in 2004, “Everybody Hates Chris” (2006), “Mary and Max” (2009) and other TV series appearances. He went on to develop his career in music as a songwriter and rapper. He has had some interesting developments recently. His life has been anything but calm. Here are five things that you may not know about Chris Massey. 1. He has a daughter Chris has a two year

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Chris Massey
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Debut feature 'Choir Girl' to shoot in Melbourne in early April

Indie feature Choir Girl is set to go into production in early April on location around Melbourne..

The film marks the debut of writer-director Michael Wormald, a former editor who directed shorts.The Death and Life of John Vaughan in 2008 and Legacy in 2014.

Choir Girl is a drama set in the 90s about a lonely photographer, Eugene, who becomes obsessed with a fifteen year-old girl who is trapped in the illegal sex trade.

The film, to be shot entirely in black-and-white, is produced by Ivan Malekin of Nexus Production Group and Lucinda Bruce. Daniela Ercoli is the associate producer.

Cast includes Roger Ward (Mad Max), Peter Flaherty (The Leftovers), Krista Vendy (Neighbours), Andy McPhee (Ali.s Wedding), Kym Valentine (Neighbours) and Vca grad Sarah Timm.

Budget is around half a million, with shooting to take place over 24 days, including a stint at Docklands Studios.

Bridget Borgobello is the casting director
See full article at IF.com.au »

The 27 greatest stop motion movies of all time

Sean Wilson Sep 16, 2016

With Kubo & The Two Strings now playing, we salute some of our favourite stop motion animated movies...

With Laika's visually sumptuous and breathtaking stop motion masterpiece Kubo And The Two Strings dazzling audiences throughout the country, what better time to celebrate this singular and remarkable art form?

The effect is created when an on-screen character or object is carefully manipulated one frame at a time, leading to an illusion of movement during playback - and such fiendishly intricate work, which takes years of dedication, deserves to be honoured. Here are the greatest examples of stop motion movie mastery.

The Humpty Dumpty Circus (1898)

What defines the elusive appeal of stop motion? Surely a great deal of it is down to the blend of the recognisable and the uncanny: an simulation of recognisably human movement that still has a touch of the fantastical about it. These contradictions were put
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Evolution of Stop-Motion Animation in Film Over the Years

I love the art of stop-motion animation, and I couldn’t be happier that there’s a studio like Laika keeping the art form alive. They recently released the film Kubo and the Two Strings, which is easily one of the best films I’ve seen this year. As a tribute to the art of stop-motion, Vulgar Efendi created a wonderful video that shows us how stop-motion animation has evolved through the years. It starts with the year 1900 and takes us all the way through 2016. It’s 116 years of stop-motion awesomeness in only three minutes! You'll find a full list of films featured in the video below.

The films included are:

- The Enchanted Drawing (1900)

-Fun at the Bakery Shop (1902)

-El Hotel Electrico (1905)

-Humorous Phases of Funny Faces (1906)

-The Cameraman's Revenge (1912)

-The Night before Christmas (1913)

-Häxan (1922)

-The Lost World (1925)

-The Tale of Fox (1930 version)

-King Kong
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The 15 Greatest Animated Films That Aren’t For Children

The great Charlie Kaufman has made his first foray into the world of animation with the critically praised Anomalisa, which we named one of the best films of 2015. Finally expanding over the next few weeks, to celebrate, we’ve decided to look back at some of the finest animated films that one might not want to show the entire family.

Who said cartoons were just for kids? As this week’s list will demonstrate, some of the finest weren’t necessarily designed with undiscerning young audiences in mind. Crossing genres and styles, these fifteen amazing features should probably be watched after this kids have been put to bed. Of course, there are many great examples beyond these, so please suggest your own favorites in the comments.

Watership Down / The Plague Dogs (Martin Rosen)

Martin Rosen‘s dark adaptations of Richard Adams‘s classic novels, Watership Down and The Plague Dogs,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Adam Elliot brings Ernie Biscuit to Flickerfest

Ernie Biscuit

Adam Elliot has toured Ernie Biscuit, his latest stop-motion short, to over 70 festivals, and he's exhausted..

The story of a deaf Parisian taxidermist who accidentally gets on the wrong plane and winds up in the outback, Ernie Biscuit was originally meant to be a feature.

"Everyone really liked the feature script", said Elliot, "but we had a budget of 40 million at one stage (laughs). It's not family friendly enough at that budget."

Development funding from screen bodies ended when Ernie morphed from feature to short, so Elliot financed it himself..

He describes the result as "a bit of an experiment".

"Things have changed. Film's now gone and I've had to learn a lot of new skills. After Mary and Max.[Elliot's acclaimed 2009 feature] we knew we had to get our budget down because things were changing dramatically."

The finished film is a crowd-pleasing charmer. The Melbourne director describes it as a
See full article at IF.com.au »

Adam Elliot talks Ernie Biscuit

Ernie Biscuit

Adam Elliot has toured Ernie Biscuit, his latest stop-motion short, to over 70 festivals, and he's exhausted..

The story of a deaf Parisian taxidermist who accidentally gets on the wrong plane and winds up in the outback, Ernie Biscuit was originally meant to be a feature.

"Everyone really liked the feature script", said Elliot, "but we had a budget of 40 million at one stage (laughs). It's not family friendly enough at that budget."

Development funding from screen bodies ended when Ernie morphed from feature to short, so Elliot financed it himself..

He describes the result as "a bit of an experiment".

"Things have changed. Film's now gone and I've had to learn a lot of new skills. After Mary and Max.[Elliot's acclaimed 2009 feature] we knew we had to get our budget down because things were changing dramatically."

The finished film is a crowd-pleasing charmer. The Melbourne director describes it as a
See full article at IF.com.au »

Anomalisa | Review

Re-Animators: Kaufman & Johnson Brilliantly Translates Kafkaesque ‘Sound Play’ From The Stage To Stop Motion

Springing from the mind that spewed an incredible string of transcendent work from Being John Malkovich to Synecdoche, New York, writer and co-director Charlie Kaufman‘s Anomalisa is yet another wholly original work, vastly different in form, but no less Kaufmanesque, narratively speaking. This go round he’s partnered with Duke Johnson, one of the creative minds behind the stop-motion production studio Starburns Industries (Moral Orel, Frankenhole), to rework a story he’d penned under the alias Francis Fregoli and produced for the stage as a ‘sound play’ back in 2005 for the Theater of the New Ear. The result is an inventive bit of stop-motion brilliance which seizes upon the inherent falsities of its chosen medium and employs them as a driving force in the examination of tedium and the apathetic perception of sameness as one grows old.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Interview: Adam Elliot On Being An Animator, Winning An Oscar And Feeling Like An Outsider

Adam Elliot, Oscar winner for the short film Harvie Krumpet and director of the beloved feature Mary And Max, has recently released his latest film Ernie Biscuit. I got the chance to chat with Adam about his films, his characters and his life.Hugo Ozman: Ernie Biscuit is the first film that you have made since Mary And Max came out in 2009. What took you so long to give audiences another film?Adam Elliot:There are quite a few reasons why it has taken me so long to make another film. The main reason is after Mary and Max, I was mentally and physically spent and despite the wonderful successes of the film, I lost my sense of self and became quite depressed. Having to live up...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Review: Ernie Biscuit Is Deliciously Good

He has a funny name. He's got a disability. He is terribly lonely... He is Ernie Biscuit, a deaf Parisian taxidermist. If you are thinking to yourself that his story couldn't be too interesting, you are mistaken. Great storytellers can bring the most unusual characters to life, put him or her in the most unexpected situations and create the most unforgettable stories. And Adam Elliot, director of the short film about Biscuit, is an amazing storyteller. After making his first short film trilogy (Uncle, Cousin and Brother), Elliot won an Academy Award for Harvie Krumpet, his 2003 short film about a man with Tourette's Syndrome. He followed that up with his only feature film to date, Mary And Max, which is about an unlikely friendship between...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Mary And Max Director's Ernie Biscuit Is Travelling The World

Australian animator Adam Elliot won an Oscar for his short film Harvie Krumpet and went on to direct his much loved feature film Mary And Max. It has since been five long years and Elliot is finally back with a new film - a short titled "Ernie Biscuit". Ernie Biscuit is a "deaf Parisian Taxidermist whose life gets turned upside down and back to front when a dead pigeon arrives on his doorstep". Mr Biscuit was first introduced to the world at the Sydney Film Festival. He then traveled to Europe for the Annecy International Animation Festival in France and Edinburgh International Film Festival in the UK. Next, he will continue his journey around the world by returning to Australia for the Melbourne International Film Festival before...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Infinite Man takes off

First-time writer/director Hugh Sullivan.s time travel comedy The Infinite Man opened at four cinemas- Dendy Newton, Melbourne.s Cinema Nova, Perth.s Cinema Paradiso and Adelaide.s Palace Nova Eastend- last Thursday.

The four-day gross is $10,640, which is in addition to the $21,000 generated by screenings at the Melbourne International Film Festival, CineféstOZ and the Dungog fest.

Executive producer Jonathan Page said, .It.s a good start and points to a new model of releasing smaller films, focussing on a few targeted sites and keeping costs low. I think The Infinite Man is building a cult following and will be watched on other platforms, so if we can make a bit of noise and a bit of money at the cinema then we are on track..

Produced by Hedone Productions. Kate Croser and Sandy Cameron, the film stars Josh McConville, Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades in the tale of
See full article at IF.com.au »

The stop-motion animation of Ladislas Starevich

An early pioneer in stop-motion animation, Ladislas Starevich's strange, touching films work still entertain today, Aliya writes...

Even in this age of digital manipulation, stop-motion animation holds a fascination for movie audiences, and there have been some brilliant examples through cinema’s history. From the year 2000 alone we’ve had Wallace And Gromit’s The Curse Of The Were Rabbit, Corpse Bride, Mary And Max, A Town Called Panic, and Fantastic Mr Fox, to name but a few, and The Boxtrolls is not far away. Not bad, for an animation technique that hasn’t changed much such it was first used in 1897.

Perhaps it has retained its popularity because it requires so much skill. Making a stop-motion movie has always taken months of precise, painstaking work. That’s not to say that modern filmmaking is a walk in the park, but I think we have a clear, romantic view of
See full article at Den of Geek »

Us deal for The Infinite Man

First-time writer/director Hugh Sullivan.s time travel comedy The Infinite Man will be released in the Us by Invincible Pictures.

Sandy Cameron, who produced the film with his Hedone Productions partner Kate Croser, tells If that Invincible specialises in genre fare and has guaranteed a theatrical release in at least three cities, date to be fixed.

The deal was negotiated by international sales agent Shoreline Releasing. By If.s count, at least 20 Australian films have secured Us distribution. this year.

In Australia the comedy which stars Josh McConville, Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades will open on September 18 via Infinite Releasing,. a new banner formed by the producers and Jonathan Page, executive producer of The Babadook, Mary and Max and 100 Bloody Acres.

Cameron says they are treating this release as a pilot before deciding whether to handle films from other producers. Madman Entertainment has acquired the DVD and VoD rights.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Tsr Blog: The Philip Seymour Hoffman Generation

In a way I am not sure I have ever felt before, for a figure I do not know personally, I am still trying to comprehend Philip Seymour Hoffman’s passing.

When we grow with artists, we do not just identify with them, or become “fans.” We love these artists, anticipate our experiences with them, and similarly better understand the potential of their means of an expression. Loving an artist indeed becomes a personal venture, especially if one is to believe that art, something that keeps us human, belongs to all of us just as much as it does the artist (to paraphrase a line actually said by Hugh Bonneville in this upcoming Friday’s The Monuments Men). My love for Philip Seymour Hoffman, an icon lost, is directly interwoven with how I began to truly watch films, and learn from them.

To quote A.O. Scott in a bold remark of perfect clarity,
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Producers tackle the distribution puzzle

Several producers who have had the common experience of finding it hard to negotiate deals with increasingly risk-averse Australian distributors have taken the bold step of launching their own distribution company.

The partners in Infinite Releasing are Hedone Productions. Kate Croser and Sandy Cameron, and Jonathan Page, the executive producer of The Babadook, 100 Bloody Acres and Mary and Max.

Their first release will be Hedone.s The Infinite Man, a time-travel comedy-romance from first-time writer-director Hugh Sullivan, starring Josh McConville, Hannah Marshall and Alex Dimitriades.

Croser tells If they have been approached by five or six other producers who are interested in routing their films via Infinite Releasing. She says Page will use his contacts to negotiate home entertainment, free-tv and pay-tv deals for The Infinite Man.

The arrangement with Infinite Releasing means the production qualifies for the 40% producer offset, a vital element of the financing. The project was developed
See full article at IF.com.au »

Bradford Animation Festival, Cinecity Brighton: film festival previews

Bradford Animation Festival | Cinecity Brighton Film Festival | Aldeburgh Documentary Festival | Korean Film Festival, China Image Film Festival | Russian Film Festival

Bradford Animation Festival

There's everything from CGI insects to lo-fi zombies on the screen at this inclusive event, which gives you features and shorts, for and by all ages, plus a dedicated gaming section. But there are also real, live people to recommend. Adam Buxton talks to anarchic image-mangler Cyriak, Steve Bell pays tribute to Roobarb creator Bob Godfrey, multi-disciplinary genius Dave McKean gives a masterclass, and stop-motion heroes Adam Elliot (of Mary And Max) and Lee "Claycat" Hardcastle are also here to talk about the finer points of plasticine.

National Media Museum, Tue to 16 Nov

Cinecity Brighton Film Festival

After 11 years, this festival knows what its citizens want: all things new and/or slightly leftfield. You'll get the hottest upcoming British and Us movies, led by Alexander Payne's latest,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Pirates plunder 100 Bloody Acres

Australian horror comedy 100 Bloody Acres was watched by a handful of people in Us and Australian cinemas -- a tiny fraction of the number who have illegally downloaded the film.

The producer, Cyan Films. Julie Ryan, said two independent companies that work in the online area estimate the film has been downloaded at least 35,000 times.

.That is three times more than we had thought,. Ryan told If. .Torrent Tracker doesn't pick up all the bit torrent sites so this figure is on the conservative side.

.These sites can't be shut down and unfortunately we can't tell where in the world this activity has occurred. But we do know that the film was on Pirate Bay the second day of the Us release, and we have anecdotal evidence in Australia where people have admitted to downloading it illegally.

.I just hope that some of these people buy the DVD when it releases in their country.
See full article at IF.com.au »
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