6.8/10
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228 user 392 critic

Hitchcock (2012)

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The relationship between Sir Alfred Hitchcock (Sir Anthony Hopkins) and his wife Alma Reville (Dame Helen Mirren) during the filming of Psycho (1960) in 1959 is explored.

Director:

Sacha Gervasi

Writers:

John J. McLaughlin (screenplay), Stephen Rebello (book)
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Popularity
4,894 ( 177)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 5 wins & 28 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Hopkins ... Alfred Hitchcock
Helen Mirren ... Alma Reville
Scarlett Johansson ... Janet Leigh
Danny Huston ... Whitfield Cook
Toni Collette ... Peggy
Michael Stuhlbarg ... Lew Wasserman
Michael Wincott ... Ed Gein
Jessica Biel ... Vera Miles
James D'Arcy ... Anthony Perkins
Richard Portnow ... Barney Balaban
Kurtwood Smith ... Geoffrey Shurlock
Ralph Macchio ... Joseph Stefano
Kai Lennox ... Hilton Green
Tara Summers ... Rita Riggs
Wallace Langham ... Saul Bass
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Storyline

In 1959, Sir Alfred Hitchcock (Sir Anthony Hopkins) and his wife, Alma Reville (Dame Helen Mirren), are at the top of their creative game as filmmakers amidst disquieting insinuations about it being time to retire. To recapture his youth's artistic daring, Sir Alfred decides his next movie will adapt the lurid horror novel, "Psycho", over everyone's misgivings. Unfortunately, as Sir Alfred self-finances and labors on this movie, Alma finally loses patience with his roving eye and controlling habits with his actresses. When an ambitious friend lures her to collaborate on a work of their own, the resulting marital tension colors Sir Alfred's work, even as the novel's inspiration haunts his dreams. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Good evening. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violent images, sexual content and thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 December 2012 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Hitchcock See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,700,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$287,715, 23 November 2012, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$6,008,677

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$23,570,541
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Many believe that real-life murderer Ed Gein inspired the character Norman Bates in the original Robert Bloch novel "Psycho", but this was not the case. Novelist Robert Bloch had already begun writing the book before the Gein murders were discovered. Once they had made the papers, however, the author noted the similarities between Bates and Gein. Gein was the inspiration for the character of Jame Gumb (Buffalo Bill) in Thomas Harris' novel "The Silence of the Lambs", which featured Sir Anthony Hopkins as Dr. Hannibal Lecter in the movie version. Michael Wincott, who played Gein in this movie, also played a similar killer in Along Came a Spider (2001). See more »

Goofs

Hitchcock talks about a quote from the New York Times and says there is an "accompanying list", but the paper he is reading which contains that list is clearly The Times, aka the London Times. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Henry Gein: It's lucky it didn't reach the house.
Ed Gein: Yeah.
Henry Gein: You know, there's gonna be a lot more jobs at that factory in Milwaukee come June. I could put in a word.
Ed Gein: You can't leave us, Henry. She needs us both.
Henry Gein: Can you stop being a mama's boy for one second? I'm not trying to hurt you, but Jesus, you gotta live your own life sometime. That woman can take care of her own god...
[Ed hits Henry with a shovel]
Alfred Hitchcock: Good evening. Well, brother has been killing brother since Cain and Abel, yet even I didn't ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

After the end credits, there is a brief shot of Anthony Hopkins as Hitchcock standing in silhouette in a large empty movie theatre before walking out of the shot. This emulates Hitchcock's trademark cameo appearance in most of his films. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Pop Culture Beast's Halloween Horror Picks: Psycho (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

You're the Only One for Me
Written by Alan Ett and William Ashford
Performed by and Courtesy of The Music Collective
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Keep the Hitch, drop the Cock.
8 February 2013 | by ChooseyAMovieSee all my reviews

Hitchcock follows Alfred Hitchcock's strenuous quest to complete a picture to which everyone deemed awful. Also incorporated into the storyline is the love story of Alfred and his wife. And the strain the picture was putting on it.

I had high hopes for Hitchcock. Alfred Hitchcock may not be my favorite director but he was most defiantly light years ahead of his time and undeniably a genius. On top of that Psycho is one of my favorite films ever made. So far this film was shaping up to be fantastic, it appealed to me in all the right ways, trailer was good, Anthony Hopkins as Hitchcock and it was about the making of Psycho. To which, aspiring filmmakers as well as the average movie goer can really appreciate. So why only a 7/10?

Well, the film delved too deeply into the love story, I personally think. The film is very enjoyable and to that aspect of the film, I don't mind as much as you may perceive but withholding that aspect and indulging on the actual making of Psycho could have really benefited this film. It's not the film Hitchcock or Psycho fans will love, it will be a film where you walk out and remark, "that was good," but not a very solid good. And normally I would be inclined to agree with you, but for some reason I still did like this film.

It contains fantastic acting including Hopkins, albeit certain scenes he may have overacted a tad bit, it's interesting and is enjoyable. In addition it also contains great references albeit not very subtle, the complete opposite of subtle to Psycho and a few other Hitchcock films which work to its advantage in my opinion. I also rather liked the inclusion of Ed Gein and the conversations that took place between him and Hitchcock.

Basically this film will appeal to everyone. But, unfortunately it isn't the film it could have been or should have been, but ultimately it is enjoyable, funny and above all entertaining. If you're a fan of Hitchcock and Psycho though, don't get your hopes up too high.


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