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In Paris in 1931, an orphan named Hugo Cabret who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton.

Director:

Martin Scorsese

Writers:

John Logan (screenplay by), Brian Selznick (based on the book entitled "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" by)
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Popularity
1,707 ( 28)
Won 5 Oscars. Another 57 wins & 186 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ben Kingsley ... Georges Méliès
Sacha Baron Cohen ... Station Inspector
Asa Butterfield ... Hugo Cabret
Chloë Grace Moretz ... Isabelle
Ray Winstone ... Uncle Claude
Emily Mortimer ... Lisette
Christopher Lee ... Monsieur Labisse
Helen McCrory ... Mama Jeanne
Michael Stuhlbarg ... Rene Tabard
Frances de la Tour ... Madame Emilie
Richard Griffiths ... Monsieur Frick
Jude Law ... Hugo's Father
Kevin Eldon ... Policeman
Gulliver McGrath ... Young Tabard
Shaun Aylward Shaun Aylward ... Street Kid
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Storyline

Hugo is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. He learned to fix clocks and other gadgets from his father and uncle which he puts to use keeping the train station clocks running. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his dead father is an automaton (mechanical man) that doesn't work without a special key. Hugo needs to find the key to unlock the secret he believes it contains. On his adventures, he meets George Melies, a shopkeeper, who works in the train station, and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo finds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and he discovers it unlocks some memories the old man has buried inside regarding his past. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Unlock the secret See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild thematic material, some action/peril and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 November 2011 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Invention of Hugo Cabret See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,364,505, 18 November 2011, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$73,864,507, 12 April 2012

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$185,770,160, 12 April 2012
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Brian Selznick: The author of the book can be seen at the very end of the movie at Méliès' apartment. He is the one wearing glasses following behind Méliès and the film professor. See more »

Goofs

The old Montparnasse train station where the action takes place did not have a clock tower. The clock shown in the movie is instead reminiscent of the clock at another Paris train station, the Gare d'Orsay. See more »

Quotes

Station Inspector: [to his dog while in the bath] If he is deceased, then who has been winding the clocks?
[cut to reveal that the Inspector and the dog are in the bath together]
See more »

Crazy Credits

There is only one opening credit, the film's title, which does not appear until nearly 15 minutes into the film. See more »

Connections

Features The Famous Box Trick (1898) See more »

Soundtracks

Carinosa
Written by Alberto Larena and Auguste Pesenti
Produced by Jean-Michel Bernard
Performed by Les Primitifs du Futur: Dominique Cravic, Hervé Legeay, Romane, Jean-Philippe Viret, Mathilde Febrer and Daniel Colin
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A simply glorious ode to early cinema
23 July 2012 | by Will_MaloneSee all my reviews

It has taken me a long time to get round to watching Hugo, but I am so glad that I did. This is a wonderful and simply glorious ode to early cinema told through the eyes of Hugo (Asa Butterfield), an orphan who after the death of his clockmaker father (Jude Law) ends up living in the walls of a Parisian train station charged with winding the station's numerous clocks.

Hugo's only link back to his late father is through a majestic mechanical automaton, a sort of tin man which his father had been restoring in his spare time. As appears to be the way with all tin men this one is also missing a heart, but this time it is a heart shaped key which Hugo is convinced if he can find will unlock the secrets inside. This leads young Hugo on a dangerous but adventurous search which often lands him in the clutches of either the local shopkeeper (Ben Kingsley) or the Station Inspector (Sacha Baron Cohen). Help is at hand though from the shopkeeper's god daughter Isabelle (Chloe Grace Moretz) and as the two join forces they soon discover they have more in common than they thought.

In Hugo, Scorsese has produced a truly magical tale which sucks the viewer into the screen via the innovative use of 3D so immersing us within the dynamics of Parisian life and the wonders that take place within the walls of the station. Butterfield is perfectly cast as young Hugo, a curious young boy determined to survive in a hard and cold world which constantly seems to deal him a bad hand; you simply can't help but love him. Moretz after a slightly shaky start soon finds her feet (and her accent), Kingsley is excellent, especially as the story develops and there is strength in depth from a top notch supporting cast including Emily Mortimer, Ray Winstone and Christopher Lee to name but a few.

Hugo's strength however is in its story, which effortlessly unfolds in front of you with real grace and elegance. Scorsese's love for the history of his craft and his desire to share this tale of early cinema is evident in every frame. Whilst it may not be the most historically accurate portrayal of cinematic history it has a true and good heart which beautifully captures the essence of what is cinema.

Some people have criticised Scorsese for creating a children's movie that is inaccessible for most children. I strongly disagree on this point. To me Hugo is a classic children's movie which works across all age spectrums, much in a similar vain to Spielberg's ET. In a world of Woody, Buzz, Jessie and meatballs that fall from the sky (which don't get me wrong are all fabulous in their own right), it is refreshing to see a children's movie of old. It feels like a magical Christmas movie to me, perfectly accessible and enjoyed by all.

Hugo is fully deserving of the many accolades that it picked up during the awards season. It is a wonderful and engaging film which I will show my children when they are a little older and I am certain they will fall in love with cinema in the same way their father need did so many years ago.

Review by Will Malone www.maloneonmovies.com


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