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The Young Victoria (2009)

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2:33 | Trailer
A dramatization of the turbulent first years of Queen Victoria's rule, and her enduring romance with Prince Albert.

Director:

Jean-Marc Vallée

Writer:

Julian Fellowes
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Popularity
3,733 ( 265)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 12 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Emily Blunt ... Queen Victoria
Rupert Friend ... Prince Albert
Paul Bettany ... Lord Melbourne
Miranda Richardson ... Duchess of Kent
Jim Broadbent ... King William
Thomas Kretschmann ... King Leopold
Mark Strong ... Sir John Conroy
Jesper Christensen ... Baron Stockmar
Harriet Walter ... Queen Adelaide
Jeanette Hain ... Baroness Lehzen
Julian Glover ... Duke of Wellington
Michael Maloney ... Sir Robert Peel
Michiel Huisman ... Ernest
Genevieve O'Reilly ... Lady Flora Hastings
Rachael Stirling ... Duchess of Sutherland

Emily Blunt Through the Years

Take a look back at the career of Emily Blunt on and off the big screen.

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Storyline

Dominated by her possessive mother and her bullying consort, Conroy, since childhood, teen-aged Victoria refuses to allow them the power of acting as her regent in the last days of her uncle William IV's rule. Her German cousin Albert is encouraged to court her for solely political motives, but, following her accession at age eighteen, finds he is falling for her and is dismayed at her reliance on trusty Prime Minister Melbourne. Victoria is impressed by Albert's philanthropy, which is akin to her own desire to help her subjects. However, her loyalty to Melbourne, perceived as a self-seeker, almost causes a constitutional crisis, and it is Albert who helps restore her self-confidence. She proposes and they marry, Albert proving himself not only a devoted spouse, prepared to take an assassin's bullet for her, but also an agent of much-needed reform, finally endorsed by an admiring Melbourne. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Love rules all See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some mild sensuality, a scene of violence, and brief incidental language and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Many of the interior scenes were filmed at Belvoir Castle in Leicestershire. The bed used in the honeymoon scene was slept in by the real Queen Victoria when she visited the castle in 1843. The bedroom is so small that all the cameras had to be placed outside the windows. See more »

Goofs

In the closing credits, "Kammerherr" (German for "chamberlain") is mis-spelled "Kammerrher". See more »

Quotes

Queen Victoria: [sobbing] I'm so sorry! I thought I was going to lose you!
Prince Albert: I don't think he was a very good shot.
Queen Victoria: Why did you do it? So stupid, why did you do it?
Prince Albert: I had two very good reasons. First, I am replaceable and you are not.
Queen Victoria: You are not replaceable to me!
Prince Albert: Second, you're the only wife I've got or ever will have. You are my whole existence, and I will love you until my very last breath.
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Crazy Credits

In the on-screen credits, Heidi Miller and George Sayer are each listed twice as Costume Assistant. See more »

Connections

Featured in Breakfast: Episode dated 6 March 2010 (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Vieni, fra queste braccia
from "I puritani"
Written by Vincenzo Bellini
Performed by Maria Callas, Giuseppe Di Stefano and Orchestra del Teatro alla Scala (as The Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala)
Conducted by Tullio Serafin
Courtesy of EMI Classics
Under license from EMI Film & Television Music
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User Reviews

Beautiful, memorable but most of all, human.
12 July 2009 | by OtobokeSee all my reviews

The 63 year reign of Queen Victoria is perhaps one of the most documented and popularly known historical reigns in British history. On the one hand, her story lacks the theatrics of earlier royals thanks to a change in social climate and attitudes, and on the other her story is one that perpetuates because it is notably human. Taking on the earlier years of her life where the budding romance between herself and the German Prince Albert was taking forefront, director Jean-Marc Vallée who has only until recently remained in the unbeknownst shadows of the industry here takes Victoria's story and captures that human element so vital to her legacy. It's a story that feels extremely humble considering its exuberant background, and yet that's partly what gives it a distinct edge here that separates it from the usual fare.

Taking a very direct and focused approach that centres in on a brief five or so year period between her ascension and marriage to Albert, The Young Victoria does what so little period pieces of this nature offer. Instead of attempting a sprawling encapsulation of such a figure's entire life, Vallée instead opts to show one of the lesser known intricacies of Victoria's early years which are easily overlooked in favour of the more publicly known accolades. The result is a feature that may disgruntle historians thanks to its relatively flippant regards to facts and the like, yet never to let document get in the way of extracting a compelling story, writer Julian Fellowes sticks to his guns and delivers a slightly romanticised yet convincing portrayal. Vallée takes this and runs, making sure to fully capitalise on those elements with enough restraint to maintain integrity in regards to both the history involved and the viewer watching.

A major part in the joy of watching The Young Victoria play out however simply lies in the production values granted here that bring early 1800's Regal Britain to life with a vigorous realism so rarely achieved quite so strikingly by genre films. Everything from the costume designs, sets, hair styles, lighting and photography accentuates the grandiose background inherent to Victoria's story without ever over-encumbering it. Indeed, while watching Vallée's interpretation come to life here it is very hard not to be sucked in solely through the aesthetics that permeates the visual element; and then there's the film's score also which works tremendously to further the very elegant yet personal tones that dominate Fellowes' script. Entwining the works of Schubert and Strauss into Victoria and Albert's story not only works as a point of reference for the characters to play with, but also melds to the work with an elegance and refrain that echoes composer Ilan Eshkeri's original work just as well.

Yet for all the poignant compositions, lush backdrops and immaculate costumes that punctuate every scene, the single most important factor here—and indeed to most period dramas—are the performances of the cast and how they help bring the world they exist in to life. Thankfully The Young Victoria is blessed with an equally immaculate ensemble of thespians both young and old that do a fantastic job of doing just that. Between the sweet, budding romance of Victoria (Emily Blunt) and Albert (Rupert Friend) and the somewhat antagonistic struggles of her advisors and the like (spearheaded by a terrific Mark Strong and Paul Bettany), the conflicts and warmth so prevalent to Fellowe's screenplay are conveyed perfectly here by all involved which helps keep the movie from being a plastic "nice to look at but dim underneath" affair so common with these outings.

In the end, it's hard to fault a work such as The Young Victoria. It's got a perfectly touching and human sense of affection within its perfectly paced romance, plus some historical significance that plays as an intriguing source of interest for those in the audience keen on such details. Of course, it may not take the cinematic world by storm and there lacks a certain significance to its overall presence that stops it from ever becoming more than just a poignantly restrained romantic period drama; yet in a sense this is what makes it enjoyable. Vallée never seems to be striving for grandeur, nor does he seem content at making a run-of-the-mill escapist piece for aficionados. Somewhere within this gray middle-ground lies The Young Victoria, sure to cater to genre fans and those a little more disillusioned by the usual productions; beautiful, memorable but most of all, human.

  • A review by Jamie Robert Ward (http://www.invocus.net)


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

8 January 2010 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Young Victoria See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$35,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$260,591, 20 December 2009

Gross USA:

$11,001,272

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$29,196,409
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

GK Films See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (European Film Market)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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