The Happening (2008) - News Poster

(2008)

News

M. Night Shyamalan's First Post-Glass Movie Will Be Fun Sci-Fi

M. Night Shyamalan's First Post-Glass Movie Will Be Fun Sci-Fi
M. Night Shyamalan is already working on his follow up to this year's Glass and fans are anxiously awaiting to see exactly what that is. The director teased his new project on social media earlier this week. "Outlining new film... Has a little fun sci-fi bent. Feels so good to begin a new story," said Shyamalan. The director recently shocked fans by returning to the world of Unbreakable with 2016's Split and this year's Glass.

As for what this Fun Sci-Fi movie that M. Night Shyamalan is working on, that is very much a mystery at this point in time. His last two movies have delved into the psychological realm and it looks like he is ready to get back to some sci-fi elements, which should be exciting for his long-time fans. Shyamalan incorporated elements of sci-fi in Signs and After Earth, but both movies received very different reactions from
See full article at MovieWeb »

Glass’ Negative Reviews Made M. Night Shyamalan Cry

Poor M. Night Shyamalan can’t catch a break, can he? To say that the director of Glass has had a tumultuous, up-and-down career within the Hollywood machine would be quite an understatement. Unfortunately, things seem to be on a bit of a downturn for the hit-or-miss director once again after the poor critical reception of his most recent blockbuster, and he took it harder than normal.

During a lecture at the Stern School of business at NYU this week, Shyamalan said that he was in London, in a make-up chair, when he heard the bad news about Glass. “I cried,” he said. “We had great screenings of the movie around the world, so essentially, I wasn’t prepared,” the director continues. He would go on to say how “distraught” he was that day. “Honestly, I was feeling like, ‘Will they ever let me be different without throwing me on the garbage pile?
See full article at We Got This Covered »

5 Reasons Signs Is M. Night Shyamalan's Best Film (And 5 Why It's His Worst)

M. Night Shyamalan's career has definitely had its ups and downs. After the Academy Award-nominated Sixth Sense, Shyamalan was on a roll, following up with fan favorites Unbreakable and Signs. His career took a dip with Lady in the Water and The Happening, and a lot of people got off the Shyamalan train after The Last Airbender and After Earth dropped. He finally made a comeback with The Visit, which got fans all the more excited for Split and the conclusion of the Eastrail 177 Trilogy, Glass. He's made some great films, and some forgettable duds, but his early work has been praised by fans and critics alike. Here are 5 reasons Signs is Shyamalan's best flick, and 5 why it's his worst.

Related: M Night Shyamalan's Films, Ranked
See full article at Screen Rant »

‘Honeyland’ Review: Macedonia’s Last Beekeeper Is the Heart of Harrowing Doc About Environmental Balance

‘Honeyland’ Review: Macedonia’s Last Beekeeper Is the Heart of Harrowing Doc About Environmental Balance
There’s no evidence Albert Einstein actually said that “If the bee disappeared off the face of the Earth, man would only have four years left to live.” The guy’s name may be synonymous with genius, but he was a theoretical physicist, not an entomologist — just because he was smart doesn’t mean that he could read a hive like a tarot card.

Of course, it’s easy to appreciate why that quote, however apocryphal, has always been attributed to him: Those words are endowed with the profound wisdom of someone who saw the world more clearly than the rest of us, and recognized the equations that maintained balance in the universe. They speak to the insect’s long history a symbol of stability and discipline (a history that stretches from the ancient Greeks to “The Happening”), and help to explain the low-grade hysteria that resulted from widespread reports
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Oa’ Season 2 Ending Is So Crazy It Could Kill the Series

‘The Oa’ Season 2 Ending Is So Crazy It Could Kill the Series
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “The Oa” Season 2, including the batshit finale.]

To say nothing will prepare you for the end of “The Oa” could be seen as an embellishment, considering the entirety of Season 2 — a meticulously drawn-out, increasingly bananas story from creators Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij — is designed to do just that. The madness only escalates as Marling’s “original angel” (aka Oa) learns more and more about inter-dimensional travel in order to save her fellow jumpers from Dr. Hap (Jason Isaacs). Yet even when you think the final bit of insanity has played out, a whole other layer of crazy is spread over the series, and the ending of “The Oa” goes totally off the rails.

On the one hand, that’s exactly what fans should want. The Netflix original series puts its emphasis on “original” at every turn; so much so, it’s harder and harder to complain whenever the bold
See full article at Indiewire »

Ranking M. Night Shyamalan's Films From Worst to Best

  • Cinelinx
With the release of Glass, we revisit the filmography of M. Night Shyamalan and rank his films from worst to best.

As much of any filmmaker, M. Night Shyamalan has had a career of highs and lows. His accolades have run the gamut from Academy Award nominee to Razzie frontrunner. He was once the talk of Hollywood, an up-and-coming filmmaker who had a gift to surprise his audience unlike anyone had ever done before. But as success came, so did increased scrutiny, and for whatever reason, he just could not maintain the same level of critical and popular approval. However, despite the nosedive of his career (and recent comeback) one thing you can say about M. Night Shyamalan is that he never strayed from his own vision and approach as a filmmaker. Despite all of the criticism he has faced, his films have consistently made money at the box office
See full article at Cinelinx »

Review: Three Characters in Search of an Author—M. Night Shyamalan's "Glass"

  • MUBI
In a baby-pink room in a mental hospital somewhere in Philadelphia sit three men who believe themselves to be superhuman: David Dunn (Bruce Willis), a blue-collar security-system installer and vigilante; Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy), a former employee of the Philadelphia Zoo with a fantastical multiple-personality disorder; Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson), alias “Mister Glass,” a comic-book expert and Mabuse-esque evil genius who has spent the last two decades in an almost catatonic state. Facing them sits Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson), incredulous stand-in for our suspended disbelief, who has made it her job to convince all three that they are suffering from extreme delusions of grandeur. Still, she noticeably hedges her bets by insisting that Dunn, who claims (among other things) to be almost indestructible and unusually strong, remain chained to a metal plate that is bolted to the floor.The scene comes around the midpoint of M. Night Shyamalan’s Glass,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Glass’ Review – Second Opinion

  • Nerdly
Stars: Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Samuel L. Jackson, Sarah Paulson, Anya Taylor-Joy, Spencer Treat Clark, Charlayne Woodard, Adam David Thompson, Luke Kirby | Written and Directed by M. Night Shyamalan

M. Night Shyamalan’s grounded and enigmatic superhero trilogy concludes after a nineteen-year wait. Crafting the breadcrumbs in only his second feature Unbreakable, after his breakout hit The Sixth Sense – both starring action hero Bruce Willis released in 2000 and 1999 respectively. A string of critical and financial failures with Lady in the Water, The Happening, The Last Airbender and After Earth seemed to, unfortunately, conclude the end of writer-director and twist talisman Shyamalan’s career. A slight resurgence in form producing the Twin Peaks-inspired Matt Dillon starring series Wayward Pines led to a new flowering of possible potential and slight reinvention. Only to be confirmed in the Blumhouse produced underground and found footage shot hit horror The Visit in 2015 that brought
See full article at Nerdly »

M. Night Shyamalan self-financed The Visit, Split and Glass

After bursting onto the scene back in 1999 with The Sixth Sense, director M. Night Shyamalan quickly earned a reputation as one of the most exciting filmmakers in Hollywood, only for his star to fade as he went from the likes of Unbreakable and Signs to abominations such as The Happening, The Last Airbender and After Earth.

Well, fast forward a few years, and Shyamalan is in the midst of an impressive comeback; having stepped away from big-budget blockbusters, he enjoyed back-to-back successes with The Visit and Split, and has just released his Unbreakable and Split follow-up Glass, which is expected to top the box office this weekend.

As revealed by Forbes, Shyamalan found himself struggling to get his projects off the ground after his string of expensive flops – so much so that he was forced to go down the self-funding route to kickstart his comeback. According to the site, Shyamalan
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

All 10 M Night Shyamalan Movie Twists Ranked, From ‘Sixth Sense’ to ‘Glass’

  • The Wrap
All 10 M Night Shyamalan Movie Twists Ranked, From ‘Sixth Sense’ to ‘Glass’
(Spoilers ahead for, well, pretty much everything. Including “Glass.”)

This weekend marks the release of “Glass,” filmmaker M. Night Shyamalan’s sequel to both “Unbreakable” and “Split.” And, yes, it does have a twist ending. But is it one of Shyamalan’s good ones?

Ever since “The Sixth Sense,” Shyamalan has been known for spooky, dramatic movies with giant, mind-blowing twists in their plots. Of course, they’re not all good — some of Shyamalan’s twists have left audiences laughing instead of gasping. Here’s the definitive list of which of his twists do their stories justice and which ones merely unravel them, from “The Sixth Sense” way back in 1999 to “Glass.”

10. “Glass” (2019)

The whole movie you can tell that Elijah “Mr. Glass” Price has some kind of grand plan for this small group of superpeople, like he’s doing some “Ocean’s Eleven” style sleight of hand behind the
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Glass’ Review: M. Night’s Shyamalan’s Double Sequel Is Half Full, Half Empty

‘Glass’ Review: M. Night’s Shyamalan’s Double Sequel Is Half Full, Half Empty
What a difference a couple decades makes. When M. Night Shyamalan dropped Unbreakable on an unsuspecting world back in 2000, the new Spielberg on the block was told that superhero movies were still a post-Burton/Batman novelty. As the man himself recently admitted, his what-if project about an everyman who discovers he may be a closet Superman was never to be referred to as a “comic-book movie” if he wanted to get it made. Just call it another psychological thriller. Or maybe sell it as a Bruce Willis star vehicle costarring Samuel L. Jackson.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Faye Dunaway movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Bonnie and Clyde,’ ‘Network,’ ‘Chinatown’

  • Gold Derby
Faye Dunaway movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Bonnie and Clyde,’ ‘Network,’ ‘Chinatown’
Faye Dunaway will celebrate her 78th birthday on January 14, 2019. The actress has had a dynamic 57-year career on Broadway, television and of course in film. She shows no signs of slowing down either since this year she will return to the Great White Way for the first time since 1982 in a play where she will play another acting legend, Katharine Hepburn.

Despite her regal bearing and glamorous style, Dunaway was actually born in rural Florida to rather humble beginnings. She was drawn to the arts at a young age and eventually graduated from Boston University with a degree in theater. A few weeks after her college graduation Dunaway was hired to join the cast of the hit play “A Man for All Seasons,” which was in the midst of a successful run on Broadway.Dunaway was also hand-picked by Elia Kazan to by a part of a repertory company of
See full article at Gold Derby »

Faye Dunaway movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Faye Dunaway movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Faye Dunaway will celebrate her 78th birthday on January 14, 2019. The actress has had a dynamic 57-year career on Broadway, television and of course in film. She shows no signs of slowing down either since this year she will return to the Great White Way for the first time since 1982 in a play where she will play another acting legend, Katharine Hepburn.

Despite her regal bearing and glamourous style, Dunaway was actually born in rural Florida to rather humble beginnings. She was drawn to the arts at a young age and eventually graduated from Boston University with a degree in theater. A few weeks after her college graduation Dunaway was hired to join the cast of the hit play “A Man for All Seasons,” which was in the midst of a successful run on Broadway.Dunaway was also hand-picked by Elia Kazan to by a part of a repertory company of
See full article at Gold Derby »

M. Night Shyamalan Made His Peace With Mark Wahlberg Bashing ‘The Happening’

M. Night Shyamalan Made His Peace With Mark Wahlberg Bashing ‘The Happening’
Some actors aren’t afraid to publicly bash one of their movies, and that’s certainly the case when it comes to Mark Wahlberg and “The Happening.” M. Night Shyamalan’s 2008 psychological thriller stars Wahlberg as a high school science teacher trying to protect his family against an environmental threat forcing those afflicted to kill themselves. The movie was ripped to shreds by film critics (it has an 18% on Rotten Tomatoes), and not even Wahlberg tried to defend it in the years that followed.

Speaking at a press conference for “The Fighter” in 2013, Wahlberg was asked about meeting co-star Amy Adams. “We had actually had the luxury of having lunch before to talk about another movie and it was a bad movie that I did,” the actor said. “She dodged the bullet. And then I was still able to…I don’t want to tell you what movie…alright, ‘The Happening.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Glass’ Film Review: M. Night Shyamalan Disappoints With His Super-Trio Sequel

  • The Wrap
‘Glass’ Film Review: M. Night Shyamalan Disappoints With His Super-Trio Sequel
M. Night Shyamalan’s films tend to exist on the extremes; for many viewers, they are either very good or very bad, with almost no middle ground. After his breakout success with “The Sixth Sense” and “Unbreakable,” Shyamalan disappointed moviegoers with dud after dud, including “The Happening” and “The Last Airbender.” In the past few years, Shyamalan has made an extraordinary comeback with the one-two punch of “The Visit” and “Split.”

With “Glass,” Shyamalan closes a story loop that he started 19 years ago with the critically acclaimed “Unbreakable.” This new sequel finds that movie’s protagonist, David Dunn (Bruce Willis), taking up a side gig as a vigilante superhero with the help of his son Joseph. Still using the ominous-looking green security guard poncho from his old job, Dunn decides the next villain to track down is the very troubled Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy), whose 24 personalities include a super-powered monster known as The Beast.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Glass’ Review: M. Night Shyamalan’s Grounded Superhero Movie Is the Biggest Disappointment of His Career

‘Glass’ Review: M. Night Shyamalan’s Grounded Superhero Movie Is the Biggest Disappointment of His Career
A low-budget, high-concept superhero movie that’s as clever in its design as it is joyless in its execution, M. Night Shyamalan’s “Glass” is meant to be seen as some kind of demented self-portrait, but which of its dull characters is the long-suffering auteur meant to be? Is he “Unbreakable” strongman David Dunn (a vegetative Bruce Willis), the born survivor who can withstand any amount of pain and keep on coming back for more? Is he Elijah Price (a cunning Samuel L. Jackson), the brittle mastermind who takes everything too personally, and prides himself on the devious ingenuity of his plots? Is he “Split” antagonist Kevin Wendell Crumb (an exhausting James McAvoy), who suffers from an exaggerated personality disorder that makes it difficult to guess what he’s going to do next, or to reconcile his limitless potential with his glaring inability to control it?

Or is Shyamalan the
See full article at Indiewire »

Bird Box Creatures Explained

Alec Bojalad Jan 11, 2019

Just because the Bird Box creatures aren't technically visible doesn't mean we can't figure out what they're all about.

The following contains major spoilers for Bird Box.

Much to some viewers delight (and others’ annoyance), Netflix’s buzzy horror leviathan, Bird Box, takes a note out of The Blair Witch Project’s book and never shows us the damn monster! Or in Bird Box’s case, monsters or creatures, plural.

This is of course thematically sound. The characters of Bird Box (directed by Susanne Bier) cannot gaze upon the creatures terrorizing them without being driven to suicide so why would the movie show us? Netflix can’t have 45 million dead viewers on its hands after all.

Took off my blindfold this morning to discover that 45,037,125 Netflix accounts have already watched Bird Box %u2014 best first 7 days ever for a Netflix film! pic.twitter.com/uorU3cSzHR

— Netflix
See full article at Den of Geek »

Bird Box Ending Explained

David Crow Jan 11, 2019

We examine what the Bird Box ending and its apocalyptic world mean for the characters' futures, as well as our own.

This article contains major Bird Box spoilers.

Who would want to raise a child in a world like this? It’s a cynicism that is stated by many in every generation—often right before parenthood grabs them—and one that nevertheless feels most applicable to a time when climate change and an increasingly destructive divisiveness seeps into the culture. It is also very much the heart of Bird Box, Netflix and Susanne Bier’s apocalyptic melodrama with more on its mind than seeing folks off themselves in grisly ways.

Indeed, the surprise feel-bad holiday smash has already been viewed by more than 50 million Netflix subscribers around the globe, and that number is likely to only increase as the weeks pass and the streaming service has to
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ok, So What's the Deal With the "Monster" in Bird Box? Let's Discuss

  • Popsugar
Ok, So What's the Deal With the
Warning: Spoilers for Bird Box ahead!

Bird Box is one of the more confounding horror movies of recent memory, in that its monster - or monsters, plural . . . maybe? I'm still figuring it out - never actually reveals itself. Over the course of the hour-and-change that our heroine, Malorie (Sandra Bullock), fights for her life, as well as the lives of her two young children, we hear the monster and see the effects of the monster's destruction, plus all the ways survivors are forced to cope with their horrifying new reality. But the monster, whatever it is, remains invisible.

In Netflix's official summary of the film, the monster is referred to as "a mysterious force" that "decimates the world's population." The so-called entity - I'm actually going to take a page out of Star Wars' book and dub it the Force from here on out - does so by making
See full article at Popsugar »

Ok, So What's the Deal With the "Monster" in Bird Box? Let's Discuss

Warning: Spoilers for Bird Box ahead!

Bird Box is one of the more confounding horror movies of recent memory, in that its monster - or monsters, plural . . . maybe? I'm still figuring it out - never actually reveals itself. Over the course of the hour-and-change that our heroine, Malorie (Sandra Bullock), fights for her life, as well as the lives of her two young children, we hear the monster and see the effects of the monster's destruction, plus all the ways survivors are forced to cope with their horrifying new reality. But the monster, whatever it is, remains invisible.

In Netflix's official summary of the film, the monster is referred to as "a mysterious force" that "decimates the world's population." The so-called entity - I'm actually going to take a page out of Star Wars' book and dub it the Force from here on out - does so by making
See full article at BuzzSugar »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed