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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010)

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1:03 | Trailer
As Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Ron (Rupert Grint), and Hermione (Emma Watson) race against time and evil to destroy the Horcruxes, they uncover the existence of the three most powerful objects in the wizarding world: the Deathly Hallows.

Director:

David Yates

Writers:

Steve Kloves (screenplay), J.K. Rowling (novel)
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Popularity
411 ( 13)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 15 wins & 53 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bill Nighy ... Minister Rufus Scrimgeour
Emma Watson ... Hermione Granger
Richard Griffiths ... Vernon Dursley
Harry Melling ... Dudley Dursley
Daniel Radcliffe ... Harry Potter
Julie Walters ... Molly Weasley
Bonnie Wright ... Ginny Weasley
Rupert Grint ... Ron Weasley
Ian Kelly Ian Kelly ... Mr. Granger
Michelle Fairley ... Mrs. Granger
Fiona Shaw ... Petunia Dursley
Alan Rickman ... Professor Severus Snape
Carolyn Pickles ... Charity Burbage
Ralph Fiennes ... Lord Voldemort
Helena Bonham Carter ... Bellatrix Lestrange
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Storyline

Voldemort's (Ralph Fiennes') power is growing stronger. He now has control over the Ministry of Magic and Hogwarts. Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Ron (Rupert Grint), and Hermione (Emma Watson) decide to finish Dumbledore's (Sir Michael Gambon's) work and find the rest of the Horcruxes to defeat the Dark Lord. But little hope remains for the trio, and the rest of the Wizarding World, so everything they do must go as planned. Written by Chris Green

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The end begins. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sequences of intense action violence, frightening images and brief sensuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Williams, who composed the scores for the first three movies, expressed his interest in returning to score the final two, but was unable to do so due to a scheduling conflict. See more »

Goofs

Hermione, when asked by Harry, says she doesn't know how long the Polyjuice potion they're using to infiltrate the Ministry will last. But she had already established in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets that Polyjuice potion lasts for exactly one hour. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Rufus Scrimgeour: These are dark times, there is no denying. Our world has perhaps faced no greater threat than it does today. But I say this to our citizenry: We, ever your servants, will continue to defend your liberty and repel the forces that seek to take it from you! Your Ministry remains strong.
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Crazy Credits

The end credits are in 3D gold text. When they conclude, the Deathly Hallows symbol appears, first in extreme close-up with all three items rotating independently (like the one Mr. Lovegood wears around his neck), then shrinks down with the title appearing centered across it. Next, the line fades out followed by the circle and, as the triangle fades out, the Elder Wand appears in its place. See more »


Soundtracks

Hedwig's Theme
Composed by John Williams
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User Reviews

 
A Nutshell Review: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1
17 November 2010 | by DICK STEELSee all my reviews

This is not a run of the mill series, but something which has been intricately planned for from almost the very beginning. With the last few films crafting the level of suspense into a crescendo, where each film augments the impending doom and gloom culminating in the finale seen in The Half Blood Prince, things get a lot worst here from the start, where The Deathly Hallows begins with a grim reminder from the Minister of Magic, before we see Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) and his ghastly lieutenants plot to take over both realms Muggle or not in quite Fascist terms.

Yes you read that right, and what I thought was quite the brilliant stroke of genius to transmit that level of fear and dread into the Potter world through something quite familiar in our world, where there's a takeover of ministries and the installation of past villains who are puppets of the regime, the continued discrimination and probable extermination of the ordinary, non magical Muggles and even the half-breeds against those who are of pure magical blood, and a curious scene where a disguised Potter head inside the undergrounds of the Ministry only to see propaganda being created by the masses in creepy, clockwork like fashion.

Everything is doom and gloom with copious amounts of shades, shadows, black and grey (save for Hermione's red dress in one scene), where our heroic trio are quite clueless without their guardian headmaster Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) always ready to pull some strings from behind the scenes. His absence is largely felt, and they are left mostly to their own devices and smarts to try and figure out a way to get to the remaining Horcruxes and to destroy them. They become the hunted with little allies to rely on, where betrayal seem the norm, almost from within their own circle of trust as well where a major subplot continues to dwell on the suggested romantic/platonic dynamics between Hermione with Harry and Ron, the former sharing a curious dance sequence while on the run, and the latter, well having his worst fear confront his lack of courage to tell Hermione just how he feels for her, well, from how many films ago.

So the verdict is whether The Deathly Hallows warranted two films. My answer is a resounding, definite yes, because there's so much going on in the story, of the relationships and friendships forged over the years, of the closure both good and bad that has to come to the myriad of characters introduced (J.K. Rowling doesn't show a lot of mercy by the way), and not to mention the inherent quest that Harry, Ron and Hermione chose to embark on that has gone beyond just the survival of Harry Potter, and what's more, introduces to us what those Deathly Hallows actually are, which goes just beyond the destruction of the Horcuxes. Danger lurks at every corner and the narrative spins at breakneck speed, harrowing most times with the frequent close shaves the rookies encounter against their enemies who are growing more powerful by the minute.

While the previous films have boasted special effects extravaganzas be it little things to pepper the scene or large battles between wizards and witches, this is kept surprisingly muted in the film since it's swaying on one end of the spectrum with Evil gaining an upper hand, and most of the effects not already something seen before in the earlier Potter films. But what ultimately leads this film into being the more powerful one, is the strength of the story and how it leads you along the way, building anticipation as we root for positive outcomes as much as possible, with slight comedy punctuating appropriate moments to lift the spirits.

Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson all share that perfect camaraderie that's been built over the years, it's no wonder that they add that convincing depth and natural realism to their friendship, with an audience that has largely grew up with them as well. There's no ensemble cast like the one assembled for the Potter franchise, though most of them - Ralph Fiennes, Alan Rickman, Helena Bonham Carter, Bill Nighy, Tom Felton and a long list more - come and go too frequent and too soon, but one hopes the evil Death Eaters do get their spotlight by the time the second installment rolls over.

Chris Columbus may have begun the film franchise and made it a large welcome for the young (especially) and old to embrace J.K Rowling's magical world, but I am of the opinion that David Yates inherited the franchise at the right point from The Order of the Phoenix where things required a consistent hand rather than a rotating director's chair, and developed the franchise into what it is today in quite unassuming terms. Credit also has to go to Steve Kloves who has adapted from Rowling's books (save for the point where Yates came onboard), knowing what best to adapt into the film, and what to leave behind, steering clear of the more cutesy tales and plunging us headlong into Voldemort's return and ascension to power.

You know that this will end in a cliffhanger, and what a cliffhanger it is, whetting your appetite to devour Part 2 as soon as it's released, just so to witness how the film franchise of our generation will fittingly conclude. I can't wait, and I'm sure the hundreds of thousands of fans around the world cannot wait for the next too.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 November 2010 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Deathly Hallows See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$125,017,372, 21 November 2010

Gross USA:

$296,347,721

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$976,965,014
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | SDDS | DTS | Dolby Surround 7.1 (D-Cinema prints)| DTS (DTS: X) (Blu-ray release)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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