7.8/10
33
4 user

The Grass Grows Green (2007)

A short look at a marine's relationship with life and death - shown from behind the recruiting-office desk.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews
4 wins. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
... Staff Sergeant Lobos
... Staff Sergeant Worthy (as Anthony Neil Moss)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
... Jorge Maciel
... Juan the Barber
Devynn Becerra ... Maria Lobos
Jazmin Dinh ... Anna Lobos
Miriam Martinez ... Maciel's Mom
Catherine Montgomery ... Quickies Attendant
Joseph Norman ... Terrence
Justin Peed ... News Radio Voiceover
Mikel Seitz ... Fernando Jimenez
Edit

Storyline

A short look at a marine's relationship with life and death - shown from behind the recruiting-office desk.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Marine's complicated relationship with life and death- from behind the recruiting-office desk.

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

January 2007 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Excellent Short!
4 April 2007 | by See all my reviews

Jesus Beltran's short "The Grass Grows Green" is powerful in its simplicity. Although Beltran says his biggest influences are Scorsese and Michael Mann, his style is stripped from any of those directors' flash and glitter. His film is observant and reflective, which is very appropriate for the story of a marine who questions his recruitment of a marine who dies in combat.

I loved this movie because it realizes the relevance of its subject matter and handles it appropriately. In times of combat, the occupation of marine recruitment carries weight many recruiters may not be prepared for- pointing to the question, should we be swaying our youth towards possible death? The answer is unclear and Beltran makes no compromises. This movie is so sharp in its flawed characters and gray moral terrain. In dealing with a serious issue, it smartly doesn't let any movie contrivances strangle it.

First time director Jesus Beltran is very skillful with the technical aspects as well. He keeps the camera moving gracefully throughout, moving the audience through the story with agility and a tight focus. On a low budget, he nicely balances elements like sound, production design, cinematography and lighting. This is a very well-made short that hits all its marks.

I was fortunate enough to see Beltran premiere this film at the Dallas film festival. It was surely a good opportunity as much should be expected from Beltran in the future. He shows masterful control that is not common among first time filmmakers. On a big budget, he just might catch up to his idols.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 4 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed