Mahasweta Devi: Witness, Advocate, Writer (2003)

"Language is a weapon, it is not for shaving your armpits" says eminent writer Mahasweta Devi in this documentary about the her life and work. At the center of a half-century of tumultuous ... See full summary »

Director:

Shashwati Talukdar

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Cast

Credited cast:
Mahasweta Devi Mahasweta Devi ... Herself
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Storyline

"Language is a weapon, it is not for shaving your armpits" says eminent writer Mahasweta Devi in this documentary about the her life and work. At the center of a half-century of tumultuous change, the lifetime of Mahasweta Devi has spanned the British period, Independence, and fifty years of post-colonial turmoil. Her writing has given Indian literature a new life and inspired two generations of writers, journalists and filmmakers. A celebrated writer and tireless activist for the last two decades, she has led a battled on the behalf of the De-notified tribes of India -indigenous groups who were branded "natural criminals" by the British colonial state, and who face discrimination to this day. Informal in style, this video explores how Mahasweta's daily life and writing is a part of her life as a tireless worker for the rights of the Tribal people's of India. Written by Anonymous

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Plot Keywords:

literature | See All (1) »

Taglines:

A portrait of eminent author, Mahasweta Devi

Genres:

Short | Biography

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 November 2003 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Calcutta, West Bengal, India

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Mahasweta Devi: The only way to counter globalization is to have a plot of land in some central place, keep it covered in grass, let there be a single tree, even a wild tree. Let your son's tricycle lie there. Let some poor child come and play, let a bird come and use the tree. Small things. Small dreams.
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