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The Thing (2011) Poster

(I) (2011)

Trivia

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The filmmakers used Kurt Russell height (who is roughly between 5'10-5'11) as an estimate as to how big the sets would have to be to faithfully recreate the Norwegian camp as no blueprints existed from the John Carpenter movie.
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An enormous number of screen shots from the first movie were kept on the set while filming at all times, in order to ensure that the Norwegian station would be rebuilt to the smallest details.
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The producers convinced Universal Studios to allow them to create a prequel to John Carpenter's The Thing (1982) instead of a remake, as they felt Carpenter's film was already perfect, so making a remake would be like "painting a mustache on the Mona Lisa". However, the prequel still has the title of the original film, because they couldn't think of a subtitle (for example, "The Thing: Begins") that sounded good.
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Director Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. had such a negative experience with the film, due to constant studio interference, that he claimed to have lost his passion for filmmaking and retired for nearly a decade. Although he has been working on films again in Norway, he has since vowed never to work with an American studio again.
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(at around 5 mins) It is mentioned in the DVD commentary that the remains that Kate Lloyd is examining at the beginning of the movie is one of the dog thing props from John Carpenter's The Thing (1982).
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In order to not try to compete with Kurt Russell's portrayal of the 1982 film's protagonist, R.J. MacReady, the character of Kate Lloyd was designed to have traits in common with the character Ellen Ripley from the Alien (1979) film series.
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The creature effects were filmed primarily with cable-operated animatronic robots on the director's insistence, since it would improve the performances of the cast if they saw what they had to react to. Computer-generated (CG) images were planned to be added as elements to the animatronics (such as tentacles) if it couldn't be done convincingly. However, audience responses from initial test screenings caused the studio to order the replacement of most animatronic scenes by full CG models. Creature effects supervisor Alec Gillis would later say that seeing the finished movie gave the special effect team a "post-partum depression"; although most of their designs had survived, their animatronics were so worked over that they felt that they could have just done the designs, and stayed home. He directed the crowd-funded movie Harbinger Down (2015) with only practical effects in response.
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The film was originally set for release on April 15, 2011. However, the studio demanded extensive reshoots, which included new CGI effects, re-editing scenes for a possible PG-13 release, and an entirely different climax and resolution. Because of this, the film had to be pushed back to October 14 to allow more time for reshoots.
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The first draft of the screenplay was written by Ronald D. Moore in 2009, though Universal then opted to have the screenplay rewritten by Eric Heisserer. However, in 2013 Moore became a co-producer and writer on the series Helix (2014) which features an extremely similar premise (a team of scientists at a remote Arctic research base combating a lethal alien virus-like organism that horrifically mutates humans and could wipe out humanity if it spread).
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The film was finished just two weeks before opening in theaters on October 14, 2011. This was mostly due to last-minute demands by the studio after the director's cut had already been finished.
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It was rumored that John Carpenter, the director of The Thing (1982), was enthusiastic about making a cameo appearance, but scheduling conflicts prevented him from doing so. However, in 2012, Carpenter himself said during an interview that these rumors were not true.
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The original design for the alien pilot in the spaceship resembled the Thing's original form as described in John W. Campbell Jr.'s short story, "Who Goes There?" with three eyes and long spindly hair.
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It is unknown if the form of the Original Thing is its true form or just one from another planet it assimilated before arriving on Earth. It may also be a monstrous combination of traits from various extraterrestrial lifeforms the Thing had "sampled" earlier, rather than imitating any single organism as a whole. The Original Thing may be the result of partial assimilation of one of the UFO's crew prior to the crash landing in Antarctica.
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(at around 22 mins) The songs the crew are singing are "Sámiid Ædnan", the Norwegian entry in the 1980 edition of The Eurovision Song Contest (1980), originally sung by Sverre Kjelsberg and Mattis Hætta. And the other one is called "Jeg gikk en tur på stien" (translated: I walked along the forest path), a well known children's song about someone walking in the woods, and meeting a cuckoo. The origin of this song is unknown.
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The scene where Sander and Finch recruit Kate to come to Antartica is the only scene in this film or in John Carpenter's film that doesn't take place in Antarctica.
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(at around 5 mins) The song Kate is listening to on her headphones is "Who Can It Be Now?", a song by Australian band Men at Work from their 1981 debut album, "Business as Usual". The lyrics tell of a paranoid man who hears knocking at his house door and wishes to be left in solitude. This foreshadows the paranoia of the scientists later in the film. This is also a nod to the title of the science fiction novella "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell Jr., upon which all movie versions of "The Thing" are based.
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According to Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. in an interview for the fan site "Outpost 31" Dennis Storhøi was cast as Sander but was fired by van Heijningen after repeatedly showing up on set "out of control". He was replaced by Ulrich Thomsen.
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According to interviews with actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead, her character is also largely inspired by Ellen Ripley, the central protagonist of the Alien film franchise, which, like the Thing franchise, belongs to the sci-fi horror genre. A comparison between the two characters was also drawn by several reviewers.
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In the 1982 version the Norwegian helicopter was a Bell 206 Jet Ranger with stripes painted on the tail and the call sign LKK painted on the side. In the 2011 version the same helicopter is used, with the same paint design and the same call sign on its fuselage.
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This is a prequel to a remake of an adaptation of the novella "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell Jr., published in 1938.
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Actor Dennis Storhøi was initially cast in the role of Sander Halvorson. However, one week into filming, the actor's alcoholism led to the production crew's decision to fire him. Scenes shot with Storhoi (including the cave entrance and the arrival at Thule with the Sea King helicopter) were edited in post-production to digitally replace the actor's face with the face of actor Ulrich Thomsen. However, when interviewed by the Norwegian press, Storhoi totally denied that he was fired because of alcoholism, dismissing this as unfounded rumors and implying that he withdrew from the project by his own decision. He however declined to give the "real" reason, saying only that it involved more people than himself and that he therefore did not feel free to comment further.
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Kristofer Hivju (Jonas) has stated that The Centipede-Thing's name is Kathy.
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(at around 11 mins) When the team first enters the cave to look at the ship, there is a snow/ice formation which looks remarkably like the head of the xenomorph from the alien series, whether it is on purpose or a happy accident is unknown, however coincidentally the effects team on this film, Alec Gillis and Tom Woodruff Jr. have been working on the Alien franchise since Alien 3 (1992) to Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem (2007).
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Pre-production artwork from The Thing (2011) reveals the presence of autonomous creatures formed from Wolner's legs which did not make it into the final film.
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(at around 4 mins) When we first meet Kate Lloyd she is studying a thawing cave bear (Ursus spelaeus).
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This is notably the only time that The Thing is shown with its original body in the John Carpenter film chronology. Aside from the Kennel-Thing, this is the only time it has been shown not in the form of a human that has been mutated in a "form" of the cell intruder organism.
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Director Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. notes that the character of Sander Halvorson was a tribute to 1951 film The Thing from Another World. Presumably as a homage to Dr. Arthur Carrington, with whom the character shares many characteristics.
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The Centipede-Things bear a strong resemblance to the Limb Scuttlers from the 2002 video game The Thing.
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The film takes place in 1982.
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The film features the song "I Gotcha" by Joe Tex. The same song was also featured in Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs (1992). Quentin Tarantino has stated Reservoir Dogs (1992) was heavily inspired by John Carpenters The Thing (1982).
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(at around 55 mins) When Carter and Jameson return to the camp, they stumble past a funny signpost full of city names and their distances. One of the cities that can be clearly read is Amsterdam, which is where director Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. is from.
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The 2011 Thing has tentacles/feelers that resemble an arthropod.
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The 'distress beacon' is the same as used for the Icarus 1 distress beacon in 'Sunshine'
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The helicopter featured in the final scene (intercut with closing credits) is a Bell 206 Jet Ranger.
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(at around 10 mins) When the helicopter arrives, one of the greeters says, "Welcome to Thule." Akin to the Antarctic base's namesake and pronounced correctly as mono-syllabic, Thule is an island in the Arctic Ocean. When the Space: 1999 (1975) television series episode Space: 1999: Death's Other Dominion (1975) aired on 2 October 1975, the planet Ultima Thule, Thule was mispronounced in a once common error phonetically as two syllables.
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Fans post both of the following social media hashtags for the release of the original version of the film: "#ReleaseThePilotVersion" and "#ReleaseTheStudioADICut"
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The dog-Thing that carries the shape-shifting alien to the American base is depicted as a Siberian Husky in this film. However, in The Thing (1982), the dog is a Siberian Malamute, not a Husky; although both species are sled dogs. This is the reason why the dog looks different in this film than its appearance in the John Carpenter movie.
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The final shots of the film depicting the dog-Thing running towards the American base are taken from the opening shots of The Thing (1982).
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Unlike the original film where puppetry and animatronics were used to depict the Thing, this film used computer-generated imagery (CGI) to do so. This was a common criticism for this film.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Originally, a different beginning and ending to the movie had been partially filmed, which would have shed more light on the Thing's backstory. The prologue would have shown how the alien pilot purposely crashed the ship on Earth, and then committed suicide. Later, an alien that was in the process of becoming a Thing would exit the ship in order to kill itself by freezing. At the end, as Kate (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) enters the ship, she finds the interior littered with dead aliens, either dismembered, burnt or in a state of transformation. In the central area, she sees the last alien pilot hanging, with its throat slit. According to director Matthijs van Heijningen Jr., the implication was that the alien race piloting the ship was collecting other alien specimens. One such specimen was a Thing, which had broken out of its confinement pod, leading to a massacre among the aliens and other specimens similar to what happened at the Norwegian base. The Sander-Thing, having taken the form of the pilot, suddenly attacks Kate, but she holds it back by threatening to use a grenade and blow both of them up. Then Carter (Joel Edgerton) enters and uses his flamethrower on the Pilot-Thing, to fool Kate into believing that he is human. After early screenings, the studio didn't think the Pilot-Thing was scary enough, and the climax was becoming too complicated, with Kate trying to stop the Sander-Thing as well as discovering the Thing's backstory at the same time. So the backstory was omitted, a new computer-generated Sander-Thing was inserted at the last minute, and a Tetris-like animation was added to the scene where Kate enters the central area to hide the dead alien pilot.
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(at around 1h 16 mins) The red axe that Joel Edgerton's character uses and eventually sticks into the wall can be seen still stuck in the wall when the Americans visit the Norwegian camp in the original John Carpenter version.
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The character Colin (Jonathan Walker) can be seen with his throat and wrist sliced at the end, which is the exact way the Americans found him in The Thing (1982). A scene was filmed showing how Colin has locked himself in the room behind the door where Carter (Joel Edgerton) puts his axe in. He then hears movements from the arm-Things closing in on him. With nowhere left to go, Colin takes his razor, slices his wrist, then sits down and slices his own throat. The scene was deleted for pacing reasons but can be viewed as a bonus feature on the BluRay edition.
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The fate of Kate like that of Childs and MacReady, is left mostly ambiguous, though it is possible that she survived with enough fuel in Halvorson's snowcat to make it to the Soviet base where she would have been taken back to civilization. However, since Carter was the one who knew the location of the Soviet base this seems unlikely. In addition, the film's writer, Eric Heisserer, revealed in an interview with the website Bloody Disgusting that in the script he wrote, Kate does not survive
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It is widely debated as to how Edvard became assimilated prior to his exposure as an imitation. While it is never shown on screen, there are two possible theories. One is that once the original Thing broke free from the ice, it may have found him and assimilated him outside the camp before it took shelter underneath the shack. Another possibility is that either Griggs or Juliette, who were assimilated at the time may have found him alone and assimilated him. It is highly unlikely however that he was assimilated by the original thing, since he was celebrating in the rec-room when it broke out, and he was searching for it with Sander, and Adam.
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In the Carpenter film, there is some confusion regarding who is who among the two people in the helicopter. During the airborne chase, the shooter (called Lars in the 2011 prequel) is sitting on the right side of the chopper, as seen from the front. After the chopper lands, a person who is by all appearances the shooter however exits the chopper from the opposite side, where the pilot ought to be sitting. Interpreting the scenes in the light of the prequel, it is Lars who tries to throw the grenade and loses it in the snow, then running away. In the next moment, it must be Matias who digs for the grenade in a desperate attempt to save his helicopter. However, in the Carpenter movie it is not entirely clear who is doing what.
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The character Lars (Jørgen Langhelle) is supposed to be the same Norwegian as the one who is shot to death in the beginning of The Thing (1982) after trying to kill the Dog-Thing (he is the one wearing the goggles with the horizontal slits). In a deleted scene from The Thing (1982), the Americans find dog tags on his body, identifying him as 'Jans Bolan'; however, since this information did not make it to the screen, the makers of this prequel were free to call him Lars instead.
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This film actually solved a long-standing mystery in the 1982 film. This film reveals that the Thing cannot replicate inorganic things - such as fillings, earrings, clothes, etc. - and at a pivotal moment near the end, Kate realizes that Carter's earring has vanished revealing him to be a Thing. At the end of the 1982 film, the character Childs still has his earring in his right ear. It can be seen just before he takes a drink from the bottle of J&B.
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Colin's death was shown only as a deleted scene from The Thing (2011), where he learns there is a Thing in the room with him. In a grisly scene, he brings out a straight razor and slashes his wrist, then proceeds to sit in the radio chair and then cut his throat. Another deleted scene shows Colin attempting to contact the American outpost from the 1982 film and is met with no success.
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(at around 1h 12 mins) The burnt Thing with two merged heads that MacReady and gang find at the Norwegian site (in The Thing (1982)) is the same organism created when the Wolner-Thing lowers itself onto Finch and assimilates the latter by joining faces.
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Chronologically, Griggs was the first assimilated human in the whole franchise.
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Kim Bubbs (Juliette), almost fainted on set while filming her scene as the Juliette-Thing, when she attempted to scream very loud for a long period of time in order to capture the sound of the creature she was portraying. The director did tell her to make some kind of sound, but added that they probably would not use it in the finished movie. However, Bubbs came up with such an impressive demonic growl that it was actually layered into the final mix.
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Director Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. has stated on his Facebook fansite that Kate originally discovered the body of the ill-fated Pilot of the ship hanging there. However, following test screenings, this idea was vetoed by the studio, and the 'Tetris-like structure' was animated and imposed over the pilot. The device may represent the source of power for the ship, because while it is operating, the ship is also powering up; and when Kate blows up the Sander-Thing, it stands next to the device, destroying it, and the ship immediately powers down. Alternatively, it is some sort of mapping device. It consists of cubes that form changing patches of yellow and blue, which may represent oceans and continents. So the device may be making a scan of the Earth and draw a three-dimensional map of it, so that the Thing can decide upon its next destination. In the final cut, it's simply never explained.
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It is heavily implied that the human side of Juliette may be conscious during her reveal and the following attack, her moans and facial expressions are unsettling as she looks helpless to what is happening to her. Further proof of this is when Juliette-Thing is assimilating Carl with the tentacles in the hallway: Kate opens the door with a flame thrower wielding Peder and Juliette is looking at them while the Juliette-Thing side of her is occupied with Carl, she has a pleading but passive look on her face and it isn't until Kate yells "BURN IT!" that the Thing side of her body notices them despite Juliette looking at them the whole time. Hinting that Juliette was helpless and her body was merely being used as a prop by the Thing.
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(at around 2 mins) The signal at the beginning of movie when the Norwegians find the space ship, sounds like the S.O.S. signal from Danny Boyle movie Sunshine (2007), when the Icarus 2 crew snapped the signal from the Icarus 1. This is because both signals are based on actual sounds received from space, the origin of which are still unknown.
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The Thing's strategy is more crude in the very beginning, simply attacking humans like a wild animal. When it finally assimilates a human, it starts scheming, getting people alone before attacking, hiding its trail and trying to reason with people. Not only can it now try to replicate people, but it knows how humans behave and has learned that they can kill it. Why? Well, since assimilated humans still have full command of human language, the Thing clearly has access to their knowledge and memories, which would naturally lend it to strategizing against the remaining people.
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Peder's fate is almost identical to Clark's from The Thing (1982 film). As he attempts to kill a character (or characters in this case) who are suspected of being The Thing only to be shot in the head by his would be victim. Both also were human at the time of death, although Clark's humanity was proven posthumously.
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It is more than likely that Edvard was the one responsible for sabotaging Kate's proposed blood test by burning the station's lab. As he was already assimilated by The Thing at this point and was the only member that the Thing was replicating at the time of the fire.
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Just like in the original film, none of the characters seemingly set up to be the Thing actually turn out to be the Thing. In fact, before the final rampage only a couple of the base personnel were actually the Thing. In particular, Kate panics at one point because she is afraid Olav might be a Thing from when his face was splattered with Henrik's blood when The Thing attacked him, as this character is about to leave the station with the American helicopter crew. She is correct that someone aboard has been assimilated, but it turns out it's Griggs
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Juliette was the first and only female character in the film franchise to be assimilated by the Thing. Several other women were assimilated, but that happened only in comics.
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Toward the very end of the movie when Lars enters the helicopter, there is a deleted scene of him bringing a box of grenades onto the chopper. He tells the pilot to start the chopper and then Lars runs into a warehouse to get a box of grenades. There are destroyed buildings and debris behind that chopper, and while he is running back to that chopper with the box of grenades, you can see a third person moving and walking in that debris that's behind the chopper. This might be a big reason why this scene was deleted. That person was most likely a movie crew member, filmer, etc. and NOT an in-movie character like Kate Lloyd.
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Colin is the only person in the franchise who committed suicide. (as the circumstances of the death of Fuchs are not clear)
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Juliette was most likely assimilated by the Griggs-Thing, as Griggs watched her run out of the autopsy room and down the corridor, after being deeply disturbed by the sight of Henrik's corpse. Griggs being already assimilated by this point, saw Juliette's separation from the rest of the group as an opportunity to assimilate her without alerting the others. Another way may be the shower scene where Kate discovers the blood on it. The Thing could have assimilated her while she was in the shower, which could have also been the Griggs-Thing.
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Jonas assimilation via tentacles penetrating and merging with his face was also a reference to Garry's fate in the original Carpenter's film. Jonas confirmed that he always believed in the existence of aliens in his conversation with Adam. He shares this trait with Palmer from 1982 The Thing.
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Jonas' death scene was similar to that of Windows' in that both men (after being hopelessly mauled by an imitation) were torched in mid-transformation; while leaning up against a bookshelf of board games in the rec room.
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Carter-Thing is the only Thing which did not reveal its true form on the screen in both movies, not even partially.
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Peder is one of three Thule Station members who was killed by a human (Derek Jameson). The second is Colin who killed himself, the third is Lars who was killed by Garry. Matias was also killed by a human, but unintentionally contrary to the other three.
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Edvard-Thing has an appearance similar to that of Norris-Thing of the first film: both are rendered unconcious and are brought for medical treatment, both kill / assimilate a companion while they are unconscious and both split into several thing parts.
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Carter-Thing shares similarity with Bennings-Thing in the fact they are only Things which did not try to attack humans after their revelation (although form different reasons).
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This film is very much an Actionized Sequel to the more psychological-thriller based 1982 film, but it actually makes sense for it to be that way. Firstly, as noted above, The Thing is a case of It Can Think: it can learn more advanced and complex methods, but it needs to learn them first. This means that the Thing encountered in this film simply isn't as savvy as in the John Carpenter film; by the time of the 1982 film, it's gained the knowledge and experience to try a subtle path. Secondly, the Thing's secrecy is inherently flawed in this film; the Norwegians were the ones who dug it up in the first place. So, as soon as it escapes, they'll know it exists and is on the loose. In comparison, the Americans didn't know of the Thing's existence until they examined the ruins of the Norwegian base, so it had the opportunity to start picking off victims and replicating them before they found out it existed. The movie happens to, by complete accident, solve at least part of the mystery of the 1982 movie's ending. The Norwegians never come up with the blood test, so the next best thing is checking for tooth fillings, piercings, or anything else artificially implanted that the Thing can't replicate. At the end of the 1982 movie, Childs noticeably still has his earring, meaning he was human. It's actually surprisingly good at keeping the ending of the original ambiguous. Either A) Mac and Childs are both human (entirely unknown to them, but evidenced by Childs' earring - something which the Thing would probably not notice losing if it assimilated Childs, because that had to have happened outside), or B) the Thing did put the earring back in (and see all the discussion on the WMG page about the whiskey bottle) because now it's really goddamn smart. The movie's bleak ending looks more hopeful for Kate when one thinks about it. Carter-Thing was most likely telling her the truth about the Russian base, because there it would've had access to more victims, and could've assimilated her on the way.
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Prior to being incinerated by Lloyd and Carter, a deleted scene showed that the second Centipede-Thing found Colin in the camp's radio room, leading to him committing suicide in order to escape the fate which befell Jonas.
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From four people who were potential Things (with Edvard, Sander and Adam) because of the absence of tooth fillings Colin is the only one who never became the Thing. Similarly as Clark in the original movie, he is a red herring during the movie (for example Juliette claims that she saw him coming from the shower where someone cleaned the blood, he is paranoid to the others similarly as Palmer in Carpenter's movie - who was revealed as the imitation, he belongs between people without tooth fillings).
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Juliette is believed to have a close relationship with fellow Thule Station member Henrik Larsen, as his death seems to have shocked her the most. She is seen grieving and openly expresses her knowledge about the personal facts of Henrik being a family man with two small children.
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There are inconsistencies between the way Colin's body is found in the various portrayals. In the 2011 prequel, he only seems to have made a deep cut. Meanwhile, in the Carpenter film, when Mac and Copper find his body, he is missing a significant amount of flesh, his head being close to decapitation. The expressions of both characters are also noticeably different, as he seems much more calm in the prequel, while in the Carpenter film, his mouth is wide open as if he was screaming. The 2002 video-game takes the greatest liberties with the character, radically altering his appearance and location.
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Similarly to R.J. MacReady, Derek also killed a human member of the expedition who tried to kill him (alongside with Sam Carter) because he suspected Derek of being The Thing.
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There are many allusions between this film and the 1982 follow up: Blair and Edvard perform similar autopsies that determine the Thing can assimilate any organism it infects while also becoming infected off-screen themselves. Both the Norwegians and the Americans burn the first alien life forms in a pit. Both attempt to use a blood test to determine who's the Thing, then improvise after the test is sabotaged. Like MacReady, Derek kills a fellow scientist in self defense while trying to prove his own humanity. Windows and Jonas are both burned alive after being attacked and infected by the Thing in the recreational room. And both MacReady and Kate Lloyd kill large versions of the alien with explosives (MacReady with a dynamite stick, and Lloyd with a grenade).
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The Centipede-Things are similar to the Norris-Thing, with Jonas' death mirroring that of Windows in the 1982 film The Thing.
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The 2011 Thing is one of the few if only Thing that actually consumes its prey similar to most predators, in that it pulled Henrik into a sort of "mouth" and began digesting/assimilating in a makeshift stomach. The stomach also doubles as a "uterus" where the imitation is formed.
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After the twin Adam and Alien fused species is outside and is set on fire, Sander is seen leaving in a vehicle. Kate is worried Sander is escaping and Carter states there is no use worrying because he'll freeze on his own and has nowhere to go and Kate mentions yes he does. The next scene shows a red gas container with the words "U.S.A." at the bottom. John Carpenter's 1982 film which took place after this film's events, were at the US base in Antarctica.
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In the original script for the prequel written by Ronald D. Moore, Kate Lloyd was described as in her "mid-twenties, pretty, and bright-eyed." As in the final version of the film, Kate was the central protagonist and a palaeontologist as well as the last survivor (not counting Lars and Matias) of Thule Station, killing Carter after discovering he'd been assimilated.
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(at around 1h 30 mins) Toward the end of the movie, the character Kate (played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead) throws a grenade into an alien's mouth and blows it up. Toward the end of the movie 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016) the character Michelle (also played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead) throws a Molotov cocktail into an alien's mouth and blows it up.
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It's believed that Edvard was assimilated off-screen by Juliette-Thing
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In this film and its predecessor, The Thing (1982), when paid close attention to the body language and facial expressions of certain characters, it can be pinpoint who is The Thing. When The Thing attaches itself to a human host and assimilates that person, the creature takes on the characteristics and personality of that person until it decides to drop the facade and attack. For example:
  • In the blood testing scene in The Thing (1982), Palmer is revealed to be The Thing. During the sequence, he initially behaved normally. But while MacReady and Garry were briefly arguing just when MacReady is about to test Palmer's blood, Palmer has a stoic facial expression and is quiet. Once his blood comes to life, he starts morphing into a grotesque monstrosity.
  • In this film, Griggs and Juliette behaved similarly to Palmer after they became The Thing. During the scene where Olav and Griggs are leaving the camp for Olav to receive medical treatment after being infected, Griggs was behaving normally while Olav kept coughing and wheezing. However, while on the helicopter, Griggs has this stoic facial expression and becomes quiet. When Olav tries to get a response from him, Griggs morphs into a grotesque monstrosity, attacks Olav, and causes the helicopter to crash. In another scene, Kate was forming a plan to try to keep the camp safe from the increasing threat of The Thing, and Juliette volunteers to help her. They go into a storage room where the keys to the crew's snowcats are stored. While Kate had her back to her, Juliette, who initially behaved normally, has a stoic expression on her face and is quiet. Suddenly, she morphs into a grotesque monstrosity with the intention of assimilating Kate.
  • Furthermore, both the helicopter disaster scene in this film and the blood testing scene in The Thing (1982) momentarily showed Olav and Garry, respectively, as red herrings of being The Thing.
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Sander-Thing's long arm on its back is similar to the unused Tongue Centipede-Thing.
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The Sander-Thing's death is similar to how the Blair-Thing was killed. They were both blown up with explosives used by the protagonist.
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Similarly as Garry in the original movie, Edvard loses the command of his station during the crisis. It should be noted that he lost it unwillingly contrary to Garry
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There is a small hint to the film being a prequel at the beginning of the film. When Kate is in the helicopter, Carter makes a joking question to Kate, asking why she wants to be around a bunch of Norwegian guys. In The Thing (1982), the people at the beginning of the movie (who were shooting at the dog) are revealed to be Norwegian after one of the characters notices "Norge" written on the side of their helicopter.
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When in The Thing (1982) (at around 40 mins) MacReady talks with the team about the alien ship crashed on planet Earth 100,000 years ago, he theorizes if The Thing was perforce expelled from the ship or if it expelled by itself to freeze on ice at ship's surroundings. Mac's first theory opens the possibility that the ship was designed or simply it was used by another alien race as jail, imprisoning The Thing inside it and sending the ship to outer space in order to save themselves to be assimilated. Mac's second theory opens a completely different approaching: The Thing is high-intelligent and it's capable to drive the ship by itself, implying that the crashing on planet Earth was on purpose instead by accident. This second theory proves to be true (at around 1h 28 mins) when Mac and Garry discover a secret tunnel under the floor of Blair's cabin, where Blair was working in a smaller version of the alien ship in an attempt to escape. The second theory is finally confirmed in this movie, when (at around 1h 27 mins) Kate Lloyd (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) faces Dr. Sander Halvorson-Thing inside its alien ship, revealing not only its interior but that The Thing is capable to control it.
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It can be presumed that Kate died out of hypothermia in the snowcat near the end, as she wasn't in John Carpenter's The Thing (1982), which serves as a sequel of sorts to this film.
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In this film, the alien spacecraft is seen safely under the ice, as the Norwegians dug an underground passage to access it. However it was revealed in The Thing (1982) that they blew up the surface of the covering ice with thermite charges, which could've damaged the ship.
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