The story of two outlaws and a bounty hunter in 1940s Manchuria and their rivalry to possess a treasure map while being pursued by the Japanese army and Chinese bandits.

Director:

Jee-woon Kim (as Kim Jee-woon)

Writers:

Jee-woon Kim (screenplay) (as Kim Jee-woon), Min-suk Kim (screenplay)
12 wins & 27 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Kang-ho Song ... Yoon Tae-goo / The Weird
Lee Byung-Hun ... Park Chang-yi / The Bad
Jung Woo-sung ... Park Do-won / The Good
Je-mun Yun ... Byung-choon (as Jae-moon Yoon)
Seung-su Ryu Seung-su Ryu ... Man-gil (as Seung-soo Ryu)
Young-chang Song ... Kim Pan-joo
Byung-ho Son Byung-ho Son ... Seo Jae-sik
Dal-su Oh ... Messenger for Kim Pan-joo (as Dai-soo Oh)
Chung-Ah Lee ... Song-yi
Kwang-il Kim Kwang-il Kim ... Two Blades
Ma Dong-seok ... Bear (as Don Lee)
Kyeong-hun Jo Kyeong-hun Jo ... Doo-chao (as Kyung-hoon Cho)
Hang-soo Lee Hang-soo Lee ... Kanemaru
Hyun Joong Kang Hyun Joong Kang ... Ghost Market Gang Leader
Sung-min Lee ... Chef
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Storyline

A guksu western. Three Korean gunslingers are in Manchuria circa World War II: Do-wan, an upright bounty hunter, Chang-yi, a thin-skinned and ruthless killer, and Tae-goo, a train robber with nine lives. Tae-goo finds a map he's convinced leads to buried treasure; Chang-yi wants it as well for less clear reasons. Do-wan tracks the map knowing it will bring him to Chang-yi, Tae-goo, and reward money. Occupying Japanese forces and their Manchurian collaborators also want the map, as does the Ghost Market Gang who hangs out at a thieves' bazaar. These enemies cross paths frequently and dead bodies pile up. Will anyone find the map's destination and survive to tell the tale? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

One map. Three villains. Winner takes all.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for nonstop violence and some drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Jee-woon Kim says he'd like this to be called a "kimchee western", after the Korean food made with fermented cabbages. He says he thinks the plot and film are spicy and vibrant, like the Korean culture and people. See more »

Goofs

Several members of the cast wear startlingly modern boots. See more »

Quotes

Yoon Tae-goo: [Lies in his hotel bed and wonders about the map he stole] What in the world is this?... Russia... Border... Treasure... Absolutely no idea...
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Crazy Credits

Be sure to watch the credits, as they show great movie stills as well as behind the scenes movie stills. See more »

Alternate Versions

The UK theatrical release had compulsory cuts made. 5 seconds of cuts were required to remove sight of real animal cruelty, in this instance three cruel horse falls, in line with the requirements of the Cinematograph Films (Animals) Act 1937. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Mexican Standoffs in Movies (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood
Composed by Bennie Benjamin, Gloria Caldwell and Sol Marcus (uncredited)
Published by Warner/Chappell Music Inc.
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User Reviews

 
There's Good, little bad and plenty of weird...
18 August 2008 | by stefankoreaSee all my reviews

I was lucky enough to see this film in a big cinema complex in the centre of Seoul, South Korea, yesterday. It is surprisingly difficult to find big Korean releases with English subtitles, so seeing Jin-Woon Kim's new film, which i have been looking forward to for well over a year, was a pleasant experience. Unfortunately everyone in the west will have to wait a little longer...

As with all of Jin-Woon Kim's films i have very little criticism to give this film, from its fantastic and totally relentless action opening to the suspenseful ending, i was completely entertained.

The cast, as expected from three of South Korea's most most talented actors were superb with in my opinion exceptionally notable roles from Lee Byun Hun and Song Kang-Ho. Lee Byung Hyun pulls off a villain superbly and fills this role with style and terror without fault. Song Kang-Ho in my opinion is the main force of the film, pulling it along with humour and perhaps the most interesting story as the film progresses. Woo-Sung Jung plays his 'good' role well but feels like the character with least depth. The film contains fantastic make-up and costume design, notably in my eyes, Lee Byung Hun's character, who looked fantastic and the on screen presence of this smart darkly dressed character set against the sandy desert was stunning.

The cinematography in this film was superb with plenty of great flying panoramic desert shots, high octane action camera maneuvers, fast cuts and perfect editing as expected from the director of such fantastic action/thriller films.

The soundtrack is fun and reminiscent of old western films with a new, modern twist to keep things up to pace. Although the story has been noted as being weak, the film really does not offer itself as an in depth period drama in the first place. The film is exactly what it calls for... Fun, fast and funny entertainment and what you can expect from some of the finest noted stars and workforce in South Korean cinema.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

South Korea

Language:

Korean | Mandarin | Japanese

Release Date:

17 July 2008 (South Korea) See more »

Also Known As:

The Good the Bad the Weird See more »

Filming Locations:

South Korea See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,775, 25 April 2010

Gross USA:

$128,486

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$44,261,209
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| | | (extended)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital EX

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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