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Watch at Home: The Children Act, The Rider, Puzzle

What's newly available for home viewing this week?

DVD/Blu-Ray

• Alpha - Kodi Smith-McPhee stars in this prehistoric adventure film about a boy and his wolf friend

Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings -Marc Chao reprises his popular Detective Dee role. The previous title started with "Young Detective Dee" but I guess now that Chao is 34 they feel "Young" is pushing it? The previous film was ... bonkers.

• Juliet, Naked -Rose Byrne & Ethan Hawke star in this well-reviewed romcom

• The Meg -the campy giant-shark flick was a sleeper hit

Mile 22 -Another gun-loving actioner from Peter Berg & Mark Wahlberg

• Puzzle - Two of our most reliable but underappreciated screen actors Kelly Macdonald and Irffan Khan star in this story about a woman who discovers a passion for solving puzzles

New iTunes 99¢ Deals

• Death of Stalin -Armando Iannucci (of In the Loop and Veep fame) is back with another political comedy.
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Bird Box’ Review: Netflix’s Sandra Bullock Thriller Is So Intense You’ll Want to Cover Your Eyes — AFI Fest

‘Bird Box’ Review: Netflix’s Sandra Bullock Thriller Is So Intense You’ll Want to Cover Your Eyes — AFI Fest
If ever you find yourself trying to survive the end of the world, don’t look to Malorie (Sandra Bullock) for an inspiring pep talk. “Bird Box” begins with her telling two small children to do exactly as she says if they want to survive, with the most important lesson being to never remove their blindfolds — if they look at it, they will die. We won’t know what it is for some time, but the urgency in her voice comes across to us just as clearly as it does to Boy and Girl (the meaning of whose names — or lack thereof — will likewise be made clear in time).

Bullock convincingly transforms herself into a gritty survivalist in Susanne Bier’s gripping thriller, which brings to mind everything from “The Road” to “The Happening” as it carves a space for itself in the post-apocalyptic canon. She’s joined in the ensemble by Trevante Rhodes,
See full article at Indiewire »

Black Mirror: Charlie Brooker Finally Explains Crocodile's Title

Louisa Mellor Nov 6, 2018

In Black Mirror’s official companion book, creator Charlie Brooker explains the title of season four episode Crocodile…

"Crocodile," starring Andrea Riseborough and directed by The Road's John Hillcoat is a wickedly dark episode of Black Mirror. Chilling, violent and horribly funny, in a very simple way, it's the story of a woman trying to suppress past guilt and failing.

What though, does its story have to do with its title? It’s been a subject of debate among Black Mirror fans since season four was released. After all, unlike a certain Guinea Pig, the animal doesn’t feature in the episode, nor is its relevance explained in dialogue.

Theories abound – some say it’s to do with the concept of crocodile tears, or crocodile file (a straight line of one consequence leading fatefully to the next), or a reference to "The Crocodile’s Dilemma" episode of the Fargo TV series…
See full article at Den of Geek »

What Do Words Cost? For ‘First Man,’ Perhaps, Quite A Lot

  • Deadline
What Do Words Cost? For ‘First Man,’ Perhaps, Quite A Lot
What do words cost? In contemporary Hollywood, quite a bit, apparently.

If you believe those who say First Man was hurt by Ryan Gosling’s ‘globalist’ defense of director Damien Chazelle’s decision not to depict astronaut Neil Armstrong’s planting of an American flag on the moon—and the Internet is crawling with those who make that claim—then Gosling’s explanation cost up to $45,000 a word this weekend.

First Man, from Universal and DreamWorks among others, opened to about $16.5 million in ticket sales at the domestic box office. That’s $4.5 million short of expectations that were pegged at around $21 million. At the Venice Film Festival in late August, Gosling, who is Canadian, spoke about 100 words in defending the flag-planting omission. “I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero,” he said: “From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite.
See full article at Deadline »

‘All Souls Night’ Trailer Turns Into Domestic Hell

‘All Souls Night’ Trailer Turns Into Domestic Hell
Director Yam Laranas (The Road) is taking a hand in producing and is behind Viva FIlms, Aliud Entertainment, and ImaginePerSecond’s All Souls Night, hailing from directors Aloy Adlawan and Jules Katanyag. Based on a story by Gin De Mesa (Aurora) and penned by Danzen Santos-Katanyag and Aloy Adllawan (The Road): “Shiela (Andi Eigenmann), a young college student gets a semester break […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Preview of Marvel Zombie #1

Marvel returns to its Zombie universe this coming Wednesday with the release of Marvel Zombie #1, and you can take a look at a preview of the issue here…aye

New From The House Of Ideas! Marvel Zombies Is Back…With A Twist! Years after an incurable zombie virus ravaged the world, a small colony of survivors is protected by the Marvel U’s few remaining heroes, including Spider-Man, Daredevil and the Falcon. But when their last chance at salvation arrives, will they be willing to sacrifice their own humanity in the process? From the twisted minds of Ice Cream Man writer W. Maxwell Prince and Stefano Raffaele (Generations: Hawkeye) comes the next macabre obsession for fans of The Walking Dead and The Road!

Marvel Zombie #1 is out on October 17th, priced $4.99.

The post Preview of Marvel Zombie #1 appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

New to Streaming: ‘Eighth Grade,’ ‘Leave No Trace,’ ‘Hold the Dark,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’re highlighting the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and an archive of past round-ups here.

Eighth Grade (Bo Burnham)

If comedy is best pulled from trauma, there are few moments in one’s life more distressingly rich to mine from than middle school. Comedian-turned-director Bo Burnham, now more than a decade removed for proper reflection, depicts the specific time period with all the spot-on crippling anxiety and all-consuming awkwardness in his modest but affecting directorial debut Eighth Grade. – Jordan R. (full review)

Where to Stream: Amazon, iTunes, Google

Gemini (Aaron Katz)

Gemini is also a fantastic neo-noir set in the Thief-inspired Los Angeles of Drive, an upside-down city, as captured in the surrealistic opening credits by cinematographer Andrew Reed, where morals have all but vanished,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Line-up for third annual ‘FilmFear’ season announced

Home and Film4 have today announced the programme for the third annual FilmFear season – six days of horror, extreme cinema, cult favourites and special guests coming to Manchester this October.

Acclaimed Scandi fantasy Border, co-written by the author of Let the Right One In, kicks off the season on 26th October and is the first of eight new films from across the globe to screen over the six-day event. A visceral fusion of Nordic noir, social realism and supernatural horror, Border’s genre-defying tone is matched in fellow Swedish title Videoman, a mystery-thriller/relationship-drama that will surprise audiences with its tonal shifts, while the chilling horror St. Agatha from celebrated filmmaker Darren Lynn Bousman bolsters the emerging ‘Nunsploitation’ genre. Let the Corpses Tan is a ferocious take on Euro Westerns and Italian crime ‘Poliziotteschi’ genre from Belgian directing duo Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani (The Strange Colour of Your Body
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Exclusive: Charlie Cox, James Marsh and Joe Penhall talk King of Thieves

  • HeyUGuys
To celebrate the release of King of Thieves, which is in UK cinemas now, we sat down with star Charlie Cox (Daredevil), writer Joe Penhall and director James Marash (The Theory of Everything) to discuss the film. Check out our full interview in the video below, with Cox sharing a few little nuggets about Daredevil: Season Three as well…

The film stars Sir Michael Caine (The Dark Knight Trilogy), Jim Broadbent (Moulin Rouge), Ray Winstone (The Departed), Michael Gambon (Harry Potter), Tom Courtenay (Gambit) and Charlie Cox (Daredevil).

King Of Thieves tells the incredible true story of the spectacular Hatton Garden diamond heist, the biggest and most daring in British history.

Produced by Working Title Films for Studiocanal, King Of Thieves is humorously told through career best performances from a stellar cast; Sir Michael Caine, Jim Broadbent, Ray Winstone, Michael Gambon, Tom Courtenay and Charlie Cox. King Of Thieves is written by Joe Penhall,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Broken Darkness Cannot Piece Itself Back Together Again: A Film Review

*full disclosure: an online screener of this film was provided by one of the members of the cast. Director/writer: Christopher-Lee dos Santos Cast: Sean Cameron Michael, Suraya Santos, Brandon Auret, Jonathan Pienaar and Ryan Kruger. Broken Darkness is a post-apocalyptic title, from South Africa. Previously titled Last Broken Darkness, this film was shot by director Christopher-Lee dos Santos. Broken Darkness stars: Sean Cameron Michael ("Black Sails"), Brandon Auret (Elysium), Suraya Santos and Jonathan Pienaar. Much of the film takes place after a devastating meteorite strike; survivors must live below ground, or face the radiation and infection above. For the first hour, everything story-wise comes across well. Then, the tone shifts from a serious dramatic thriller to an overly sombre series of scenes. This shift, in tone, is a bit disconcerting. Also, somewhat reminiscent of Jeff Renfroe's The Colony (2013) and John Hillcoat's The Road (2009), Broken Darkness brings the.
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

Review: King of Thieves (2018)

Sir Michael Caine and an all-star cast of British wrinklies bicker and creak their way through the audacious Hatton Garden heist that shuffles into an lacklustre crime caper.

The Hatton Garden heist is the biggest robbery in British history since Bruce Reynolds slipped into a train conductor’s uniform and ransacked £2.6 million pounds (that’s £50 million quid in today’s money) from a Royal Mail train back in 1963. Surely, in 2015 a new breed of lithe, cunning and internet ready thieves, tunnelled their way into Hatton Garden’s safety deposit box vault and pinched jewellery, cash and gold to the tune of an estimated £300 million pounds…?

No. Maybe, ten or so years younger than The Great British Train Robbers, Brian Reader at 76 with his four man crew of old lags and a so-called security alarm expert, pulled off an audacious Easter Bank Holiday robbery that gripped the nation, and the wider world.
See full article at The Cultural Post »

Q&A: Writer/Director Mathieu Turi on Blending Genres and Working with Javier Botet for Hostile

  • DailyDead
Stranded in a car wreck in a post-apocalyptic wasteland, Juliette (Brittany Ashworth) has to fend off a strange creature who isn't interested in giving her a hand in Hostile. With the new horror movie out now on VOD platforms and DVD from 4Digital Media, we caught up with writer/director Mathieu Turi to discuss combining genres, the influence of Richard Matheson's I Am Legend, and working with Javier Botet.

Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us, Mathieu. How and when did you first come up with the idea for Hostile?

Mathieu Turi: I previously did two short films, Sons of Chaos (2010), a post-apocalyptic/action/creature short which received official selection in multiple film festivals around the world and officially competed at Sitges in 2011. The second film, Broken (2012), is a love story/drama set in an elevator. So, in a way, Hostile is a mix of the two short films.
See full article at DailyDead »

King of Thieves Review

  • HeyUGuys
Lovable British rogues have enthralled cinema goers for the better part of a century in classic London crime capers like Brighton Rock, The Lavender Hill Mob, The Italian Job and The Long Good Friday, through to McVicar, Lock Stock, Sexy Beast and Legend (2015). Even when brandishing knuckle dusters, plotting to off little old ladies, threatening to shit the Ira or taking their shirts off (cas they’re “sweating like a c*%t”), these antiheroes have made a massive mark in cinema over the decades. Despite being synonymous with heist movies they are arguably a genre unto themselves yet, but while the widespread affection remains, there hasn’t been a truly memorable cockney/ London crime film or character for quite some time.

In 2015, the infamous Hatton Garden robbery, in which £200 million’s worth of cash and jewels were stolen from safety deposit boxes, provided film producers with the basis for a fresh and relevant take.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Watch Them Before They're Gone! These 28 Movies and Shows Are Leaving Netflix in August

  • Popsugar
It's that time again! The dreaded time of the month when you take a deep breath and prepare to say goodbye to all the movies and shows leaving Netflix. While the streaming service has some exciting additions in store for August (including The Princess Diaries 2 and The Good Place season two), there are a handful of fan-favorites being pulled. Seriously, why do you have to take away Finding Dory, Netflix? See what else will be disappearing from your queue.

Related: Orange Is the New Black, Jurassic Park, and 66 Other New Titles Hitting Netflix in July Aug. 1

3000 Miles to Graceland

Adventures in Babysitting

Can't Buy Me Love

Care Bears: Welcome to Care-a-Lot, season one

Finding Dory

Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay

Reasonable Doubt

The Killing, seasons one-three

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Aug. 2

10 Rules for Sleeping Around

Aug. 5

13 Assassins

Aug. 6

Welcome to Me

Aug. 10

St. Vincent

Aug. 12

For a Good Time,
See full article at Popsugar »

Watch Them Before They're Gone! These 28 Movies and Shows Are Leaving Netflix in August

It's that time again! The dreaded time of the month when you take a deep breath and prepare to say goodbye to all the movies and shows leaving Netflix. While the streaming service has some exciting additions in store for August (including The Princess Diaries 2 and The Good Place season two), there are a handful of fan-favorites being pulled. Seriously, why do you have to take away Finding Dory, Netflix? See what else will be disappearing from your queue.

Related: Orange Is the New Black, Jurassic Park, and 66 Other New Titles Hitting Netflix in July Aug. 1

3000 Miles to Graceland

Adventures in Babysitting

Can't Buy Me Love

Care Bears: Welcome to Care-a-Lot, season one

Finding Dory

Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay

Reasonable Doubt

The Killing, seasons one-three

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Aug. 2

10 Rules for Sleeping Around

Aug. 5

13 Assassins

Aug. 6

Welcome to Me

Aug. 10

St. Vincent

Aug. 12

For a Good Time,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

‘Aurora': Watch the Mesmerizing Trailer for Yam Laranas’ Shipwreck Ghost Story (Exclusive Video)

‘Aurora': Watch the Mesmerizing Trailer for Yam Laranas’ Shipwreck Ghost Story (Exclusive Video)
Aurora,” the upcoming horror thriller from director Yam Laranas, isn’t going to help you sleep easy: it’s the story of a perilous search for bodies after a shipwreck off a forgotten island. But the dead have their own agenda.

Laranas, who once made this excellent video for TheWrap about how to create a great horror movie, puts all his skills to work on “Aurora.” Shot in Batanes, the remote northernmost island of the Philippines, about 200 miles from Taiwan, provides the setting for a young woman (Anne Curtis) to receive a harrowing proposition.

Watch the trailer above.

Also Read: How to Make a Horror Movie (Video)

Here’s the film’s logline:

The passenger ship Aurora mysteriously collides into the rocky sea threatening an entire island and a young woman and her sister’s lives who must survive to stay alive by finding missing dead bodies for a bounty…
See full article at The Wrap »

‘The Domestics’ Review

Stars: Kate Bosworth, Tyler Hoechlin, David Dastmalchian, Sonoya Mizuno, Laura Cayouette, Lance Reddick | Written and Directed by Mike P. Nelson

This entertaining post-apocalyptic thriller marks an auspicious feature debut for sound designer-turned-writer-director Mike P. Nelson. Essentially it’s The Road meets The Warriors, with a bit of Mad Max: The Road Warrior thrown in for good measure.

In a scene-setting prologue, we learn of an apocalyptic event, in which jet planes dumped black poison gas on America, killing half the population. The survivors quickly segregated into various cult-like groups or tribes, with names like the Sheets, the Cherries, the Plowboys, the Nailers and the Gamblers. Those who remain unaffiliated to a group are known as The Domestics, and they have to remain constantly vigilant against gang attacks.

Two such Domestics are Mark and Nina West, a couple on the brink of divorce who become concerned about Nina’s family in Milwaukee,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Doctor Who: The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor #2′ Review

Written by James Peaty | Art by Pasquale Qualano | Published by Titan Comics

So, issue 2 has rolled around fast for this, The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor. James Peaty returns to script, though The Eleventh Doctor has replaced the Tenth of last issue, and Pasquale Qualano steps in as the new artist. This being Titan Comics big traditional Doctor Who event this year, I’m guessing, this is as close to a team up of the Doctor’s you will get. It’s not so much a team up as a gathering of common threads all leading to the unveiling of The Thirteenth Doctor. Last issue was a great start to proceedings, as much fun for seeing Ten strut his stuff after a little absence as for the mini-series this is all part of. Now, time for Eleven to remind us.

‘The Steampunk Conundrum’ takes us to 1896 San Francisco, where The Doctor
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Iceman review – revenge served cold'n'bloody

Felix Randau’s violent drama reconstructs the life and death of a man found preserved in ice 5,000 years later

In 1991, two tourists hiking in the Austrian Alps made a staggering discovery: a 5,000-year-old man almost perfectly preserved in the ice, with clothes and shoes made from furs and animal-hide. He had a distinctive copper axe, an arrowhead lodged in his body and traces of what were subsequently found to be four different types of blood on him. Clearly, he had died a violent and dramatic death. What can have led to it?

This movie from German writer-director Felix Randau makes a bold attempt at imaginative reconstruction. It is harrowingly brutal, drenched in male violence, with unsubtitled dialogue grunted in the obscure language of early Rhetian, believed to have been in use there at that time. The result is something like a revenge western crossed with something, not prehistoric, but post-historic
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Dr. Who: The Road to the Thirteenth Doctor #1′ Review

Written by James Peaty | Art by Iolanda Zanfardino | Published by Titan Comics

You would have to be living under a rock to not realise that a new Doctor is on the horizon, with the regeneration of Peter Capaldi’s Doctor last Christmas into Jodie Whittaker’s Thirteenth Doctor. It’s a regeneration of course that has divided Who fandom, with vocal fans and critics alike. Me? I’m on the fence. Although not a casting I think is a slam dunk, and with Missy having already having played with that whole female Time Lord thing, I’m not sure a female Doctor was the right thing to do right now. That being said, it has been done, she has been cast, and I’m happy to give both the show and The Doctor every chance. Remember when fans were up in arms when Matt Smith was cast because he was
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »
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