6.6/10
189
2 user

Tomatos Another Day (1930)

The images on the screen tell it all. In a drawing room, the clock shows two on an afternoon. Adulterous lovers cling; her husband is due home momentarily, so he leaves. She goes to a table... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Tarantella (1940)
Animation | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

Abstract animation illustrates Edwin Gerschefski's modernist composition. Two dots - one blue and one orange - appear most often, sometimes large, sometimes small, sometimes overlapping. ... See full summary »

Directors: Mary Ellen Bute, Ted Nemeth
Danse macabre (1922)
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

In Camille Saint-Saëns' Danse Macabre visual symphony, the desperate young lovers, Youth and Love try to evade Death's cold grip, as the terrible Black Plague devastates Spain.

Director: Dudley Murphy
Stars: Adolph Bolm, Ruth Page, Olin Howland
Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

A number of scenes are cut and assembled together to explore the meaning and interpretation of art.

Director: Sidney Peterson
Stars: Marie Hirsh
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Arrival in the Bronx is shown with a view from an elevated train as it enters the city. Then follows a montage of sights from the Bronx. Many typical neighborhood activities are shown, along with scenes from many local businesses.

Director: Jay Leyda
Short | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

This short experimental film tells the story of a man who comes to Hollywood to become a star, only to fail and be dehumanized (he is identified by the number 9314 written on his forehead),... See full summary »

Directors: Robert Florey, Slavko Vorkapich
Stars: Jules Raucourt, Voya George, Robert Florey
Short | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A traveller arrives at the Usher mansion to find that the sibling inhabitants, Roderick and Madeline Usher, are living under a mysterious family curse: Roderick's senses have become ... See full summary »

Directors: James Sibley Watson, Melville Webber
Stars: Herbert Stern, Hildegarde Watson, Melville Webber
Short | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

The fiend faces the spectacular mind-bending consequences of his free-wheeling rarebit binge.

Directors: Wallace McCutcheon, Edwin S. Porter
Stars: Jack Brawn
Animation | Short | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

A tone poem: two woodland sprites dance about, atop power lines and among flowers and leaves, while being pursued. Everyone spends some time pulling levers to switch trains, too.

Directors: Anthony Gross, Hector Hoppin
Edit

Storyline

The images on the screen tell it all. In a drawing room, the clock shows two on an afternoon. Adulterous lovers cling; her husband is due home momentarily, so he leaves. She goes to a table to play solitaire, sitting on her departed lover's hat. She removes it and sets it on the table as her husband enters. She denies anyone has been with her, except her lover. She and her husband go into the bedroom. The lover comes back for his hat. The married couple returns to the drawing room, and the men confront each other, with cigarettes, pistol, and puns, while she sits at the table. Is there anything anyone can do for the other in this satire on the needlessness of talking pictures? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

table | clock | solitaire | lie | murder | See All (20) »

Genres:

Short | Comedy | Romance

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1930 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

A rather painful experiment.
4 November 2011 | by See all my reviews

James Sibley Watson made this bizarre art film and apparently thought it was a dismal failure and he tried to hide this film. Somehow, it made it to the DVD set entitled "Unseen Cinema: 1884-1941" and is on Disc 2.

When you see this film, you might easily see why Watson disowned it. Like a Dadaist film, it really makes no sense and Watson deliberately directs his actors to act in a terrible fashion. The leading man and woman talk mechanically--almost zombie-like. It's really rather stupid if you ask me, though I am sure there are folks out there that adore this sort of stuff. Why make a film with deliberately horrible acting?! To quote my youngest daughter "...whatever". As for me, whacking myself in the head with a dead fish is certainly more enjoyable. And, I am sure, a Dadaist would love to see that!


1 of 11 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 2 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed