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Review: Joachim Lafosse's 'Our Children' Starring Tahar Rahim

Some movies you don't exit, you escape. You crawl out from underneath them, they're so heavy and oppressive and immovably huge. "Our Children" is one such weighty mass. But instead of being a transformative, ultimately life-affirming experience, the way similarly bleak "Amour" and "Rust & Bone" are, "Our Children" is full of one-note grimness. Directed by Belgian film director Joachim Lafosse ("Nue Propriété," "Élève libre") there's nothing to be gained from the experience, and it is a grim drag in both content and form. By the time it reaches its semi-shocking conclusion, groans erupted from our audience and the squeaking of hastily exited chairs could be heard. The opening frames of "Our Children" reveal four tiny coffins being loaded into an airplane. They're followed by a shot of Murielle (Emilie Dequenne), who looks all beat up and tells the unseen person at her bedside that she wants the kids to be buried in Morocco.
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Nyff Review: Joachim Lafosse's 'Our Children' Staring Tahar Rahim Is Unbelievably Grim In Both Content And Form

Some movies you don't exit, you escape. You crawl out from underneath them, they're so heavy and oppressive and immovably huge. "Our Children" is one such weighty mass. But instead of being a transformative, ultimately life-affirming experience, the way similarly bleak "Amour" and "Rust & Bone" are, "Our Children" is full of one-note grimness. Directed by Belgian film director Joachim Lafosse ("Nue Propriété," "Élève libre") there's nothing to be gained from the experience, and is a grim drag in both content and form. By the time it reaches its semi-shocking conclusion, groans erupted from our audience and the squeaking of hastily exited chairs could be heard. The opening frames of "Our Children" reveal four tiny coffins being loaded into an airplane. They're followed by a shot of Murielle (Emilie Dequenne), who looks all beat up and who tells the unseen...
See full article at The Playlist »

Top 20 Alternative Picks for Cannes 2012: Joachim Lafosse’s A perdre la raison

Buzz: It what looks to be especially strong dramatic fare, Nue propriété (2006) and Élève libre (2008) helmer Joachim Lafosse stamped this picture with Cannes laurels: the mix includes fellow Belge Emilie Dequenne (Dardenne bros’ Rosetta) and reunites A Prophet’s Tahar Rahim and Niels Arestrup as well. Lafosse likes to provoke his texts with bent out of shape characters – they lack a certain lack of transparency and the family dynamic, a focal point in his last three, never turn out to be quite the white picket fence and 2.5 kids sort. French-speaking auds will definitely consider this Un Certain Regard selected film as a must item, but international auds might overlook the grim number.

Gist: Murielle (Émilie Dequenne) and Mounir (Tahar Rahim) love each other passionately. Ever since he was a boy, the young man has been living with Doctor Pinget (Niels Arestrup) who provides him with a comfortable life. When Mounir
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Take Three: Jérémie Renier

Craig from Dark Eye Socket here with another Take Three. Today: Jérémie Renier

Take One: Private Property/Nue propriété (2006)

Joachim Lafosse’s beautifully-crafted French family drama Private Property, starred arthouse doyenne Isabelle Huppert alongside Renier and his brother Yannick (also an actor). They're just about getting on in a country house that non-identical twins Thierry (Jérémie) and François (Yannick) don’t want to sell, but Mater Dearest does; the live-away father/ex-husband backs the twins – and it’s his house. The drama is all about the to and fro of this looming possibility, the elephant smack bang in the front room and pregnant with the biggest pause imaginable. Lafosse curiously shapes his narrative with inharmonious tension between the three: it’s sometimes sexual, sometimes queasily thick, and most times unavoidable. Freud would’ve loved a visit with this Gallic clan.

Renier plays the pivotal character; an invisible finger seems to
See full article at FilmExperience »

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