Widow Dashwood and her three unmarried daughters, Elinor, Marianne and Margaret, inherit only a tiny allowance. So they move out of their grand Sussex home to a more modest cottage in ... See full summary »
Reviews
Popularity
1,922 ( 70)

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1  
2008  
Nominated for 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 2 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
Dominic Cooper ...  Willoughby 3 episodes, 2008
Charity Wakefield ...  Marianne Dashwood 3 episodes, 2008
Hattie Morahan ...  Elinor Dashwood 3 episodes, 2008
Janet McTeer ...  Mrs. Dashwood 3 episodes, 2008
Lucy Boynton ...  Margaret Dashwood 3 episodes, 2008
David Morrissey ...  Colonel Brandon 3 episodes, 2008
Linda Bassett ...  Mrs Jennings 3 episodes, 2008
Mark Williams ...  Sir John Middleton 3 episodes, 2008
Claire Skinner ...  Fanny Dashwood 3 episodes, 2008
Rosanna Lavelle ...  Lady Middleton 3 episodes, 2008
Dan Stevens ...  Edward Ferrars 3 episodes, 2008
Mark Gatiss ...  John Dashwood 2 episodes, 2008
Caroline Hayes ...  Eliza 2 episodes, 2008
David Glover David Glover ...  Foot 2 episodes, 2008
Daisy Haggard ...  Miss Steele 2 episodes, 2008
Anna Madeley ...  Lucy Steele 2 episodes, 2008
Leo Bill ...  Robert Ferrars 2 episodes, 2008
Morgan Overton Morgan Overton ...  Little Henry 2 episodes, 2008
Tim McMullan ...  Mr Palmer 2 episodes, 2008
Tabitha Wady Tabitha Wady ...  Charlotte Palmer 2 episodes, 2008
Roy Holder ...  Thomas 2 episodes, 2008
Edit

Storyline

Widow Dashwood and her three unmarried daughters, Elinor, Marianne and Margaret, inherit only a tiny allowance. So they move out of their grand Sussex home to a more modest cottage in Devonshire. There, the prevailing ambition is to find suitable husbands for the girls. With help from wealthy neighbor Sir John Middleton, suitors for Elinor and Marianne are soon found, but not landed. They include dashing Willoughby, future vicar Edward Ferrars and retired colonial gentleman Colonel Brandon. Written by KGF Vissers

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The beige, tan and maroon floral-stripe dress worn by a servant at John and Fanny Dashwood's London house is the same costume worn by Alison Steadman at Longbourn in Pride and Prejudice (1995), Miss Crawley's maid at Queen's Crawley in Vanity Fair (1998), Natasha Little (Augusta Leigh) during her pregnancy in Byron (2003), Hayley Conick in The Regency House Party (2004), and Janine Duvitski (Mrs. Meagles) for Arthur Clennam's visit in Little Dorrit (2008). See more »

Goofs

The scene: Elinor finds Edward chopping wood in the rain. We see Elinor approaching with her arms holding the shawl over her head and shoulders. When the shot shifts and we see Elinor from her back, the shawl is covering only her head, with arms over the shawl. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Story of the Costume Drama: Picture Perfect (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Hey, Ho, the Wind and the Rain
Traditional
Words by William Shakespeare
Performed by Charity Wakefield
See more »

User Reviews

 
wonderful cast and settings, but a poor screenplay
23 February 2008 | by streziseSee all my reviews

I loved the look of this adaptation of the novel and thought almost all the characters were ideally cast. In fact, I can't imagine a better Elinor, and the rest of the Dashwood family was close to ideal. As usual the BBC found lovely settings, though the cottage is too basic to be believable and too close to the sea (!): Austen's concept of a cottage was a great deal more than this (four reception rooms downstairs, I believe). The problem is the screenplay, which trivialises so much of the novel, fails to understand some of its basic premises, and relies on visual titillation at the expense of the dialogue that was much more in evidence in the BBC's generally superior previous attempt. The moral of the story, both implied in this adaptation and explicit in the book, is to do with the dangers of excessive sensibility and not editing your feelings in order to conform to social conditions. It is not to do with what you do being more important than what you feel, as Marianne puts it during her sudden, Stepford-wife transformation to rationality. Her illness is not physical, and certainly has nothing to do with the ridiculous scene in the rain Davies has devised: it is in her mind. The whole point of the story is to show the danger of over-indulging one's feelings and disengaging from society. Davies: read the book again, and even if the book is to be changed, at least be consistent. The end product here was, I believe, a dumbing down of one of the most miraculous stories of the very early nineteenth century.


37 of 55 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 51 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 March 2008 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Sense & Sensibility See more »

Filming Locations:

Berkshire, England, UK See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(1 Episode) | (1 Episode) | (1 Episode) | (3 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed