Japan, 250 years ago. Soetsu is a moneylender who is killed by the cruel samurai Shinzaemon. His body is dumped in the Kasenega-Fuchi river. According to legend, all who drown in the river ... See full summary »

Director:

Hideo Nakata

Writers:

Satoko Okudera (screenplay), Enchô San'yûtei (story "Shinkei Kasane-ga-fuchi")
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Cast

Credited cast:
Kikunosuke Onoe Kikunosuke Onoe ... Shinkichi
Hitomi Kuroki Hitomi Kuroki ... Oshiga
Mao Inoue Mao Inoue ... Ohisa
Kumiko Asô ... Orui
Tae Kimura Tae Kimura ... Osono
Asaka Seto Asaka Seto ... Oshizu
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Takaaki Enoki Takaaki Enoki ... Shinzaemon Fukami
Leona Hirota ... Okou (as Reona Hirota)
Teisui Ichiryûsai Teisui Ichiryûsai ... Storyteller
Taigi Kobayashi Taigi Kobayashi
Ken Mitsuishi Ken Mitsuishi ... Kanzou, Shinichi's uncle
Shôji Murakami Shôji Murakami
Naomasa Musaka Naomasa Musaka ... Soetsu
Taeko Nishino Taeko Nishino ... Osena
Yumi Shimizu Yumi Shimizu ... Omitsu
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Storyline

Japan, 250 years ago. Soetsu is a moneylender who is killed by the cruel samurai Shinzaemon. His body is dumped in the Kasenega-Fuchi river. According to legend, all who drown in the river will never surface again. 20 Years later, Shinkichi, the handsome son of Shinzaemon, coincidentally meets Toyoshiga, the daughter of Soetsu. They fall in love. It is a doomed love, as the spirit of Soetsu is far from dead. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Drama | Horror | Romance

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Though not originally released as part of the J-Horror Theater film series, this film was eventually included as the fifth installment of the anthology. Previous releases include Infection (2004), Premonition (2004), Reincarnation (2006), and Retribution (2007). See more »

Connections

Version of The Passion of a Woman Teacher (1926) See more »

Soundtracks

Fated
Performed by Ayumi Hamasaki
Courtesy of avex trax
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User Reviews

 
I missed Sadako
5 October 2007 | by moimoichan6See all my reviews

"Kaidan" is a part of a ghost's stories anthology produces by the Japanese master of J-horror Takashige Ichise. Alongside with the great Shimizu's" Reincarnation" and the disappointing Kurosawa's "Retribution", "Kaidan" forms a trilogy that the producer wants as a reflection of the best that Japanese horror movies can offer. Unfortunately, "Kaidan" is the worst of the three movies, and Nataka doesn't manage to create fear as he successfully did in "Dark Water" or in his rightfully most famous movie : "Ring".

"Kaidan" is an homage to the classical romantic horror stories that Japanese studios produced in the fifties and sixties. It begins with an elaborated black and white narration, that tells an old samurai/ghost tale in a classical Japanese Kabuki style. But soon after this beautiful introduction, the actual story really starts, ans if almost as if all this introductory sequence had took all the talent of Nakata. It mostly deals with a young itinerant salesman, that convinces an older singing teacher to marry him, in the medieval Japan where such a socially disturbing weeding like this one wasn't easy. When she dies, women easily felt in love with the young boy, whereas his love is doomed by his previous wife...

The story is so classical that it becomes boring and predictable. The photography is just plain and gives a televisual look to the movie (whereas Shimizu gave an amazing visual touch to his one), and the direction is quite the same : unoriginal and even sometimes lazy (whereas Kurosawa used a very inventive use of space in in movie, and a very inventive direction).

But to me, the worst element of this movie might be the lead actor, Kikunosuke Onoe, who's supposedly a charismatic character in the movie. But he's really got a enormous lack of charisma and never manage to give any credibility or substance to to his character and the story he carries. He's supposedly a master of a old Kabuki technique, but he apparently failed to transpose it on the big screen. Or I may have lacked the culture the subtility of his play required. Anyway, I just found it quite boring, and nearly felt asleep while watching his Kabuki plays.

All in all, "J-Horror" isn't a really good introduction to the Japanese modern ghosts movies. If the directors are all good, their works here look a lot like a repetition of their previous movies, that were far better. So Shimizu's "Grudge", Kurosawa's "Kairo" and Nakata's "Ring" still stay the best of the Jap'Horror movie collection.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

4 August 2007 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

A Maldição Do Rio See more »

Filming Locations:

Inashiki, Ibaraki, Japan See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$3,646,201
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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