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The Kids Are All Right (2010)

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Two children conceived by artificial insemination bring their biological father into their non-traditional family life.

Director:

Lisa Cholodenko
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Popularity
4,318 ( 342)
Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 28 wins & 120 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Julianne Moore ... Jules
Annette Bening ... Nic
Mark Ruffalo ... Paul
Mia Wasikowska ... Joni
Josh Hutcherson ... Laser
Yaya DaCosta ... Tanya (as Yaya Dacosta)
Kunal Sharma ... Jai
Eddie Hassell ... Clay
Zosia Mamet ... Sasha
Joaquín Garrido ... Luis
Rebecca Lawrence Levy ... Brooke (as Rebecca Lawrence)
Lisa Eisner Lisa Eisner ... Stella
Eric Eisner ... Joel
Sasha Spielberg ... Waify Girl
James MacDonald ... Clay's Dad (as James Macdonald)
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Storyline

Nic and Jules are in a long term, committed, loving but by no means perfect same-sex relationship. Nic, a physician, needs to wield what she believes is control, whereas Jules, under that control, is less self-assured. During their relationship, Jules has floundered in her "nine to five" life, sometimes trying to start a business - always unsuccessfully - or being the stay-at-home mom. She is currently trying to start a landscape design business. They have two teen-aged children, Joni (conceived by Nic) and Laser (by Jules). Although not exact replicas, each offspring does more closely resemble his/her biological mother in temperament. Joni and Laser are also half-siblings, having the same unknown sperm donor father. Shortly after Joni's eighteenth birthday and shortly before she plans to leave the house and head off to college, Laser, only fifteen and underage to do so, pleads with her to try and contact their sperm donor father. Somewhat reluctantly, she does. He is late ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Nic and Jules had the perfect family, until they met the man who made it all possible.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong sexual content, nudity, language and some teen drug and alcohol use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official Site | See more »

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 July 2010 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Los niños están bien See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$491,971, 11 July 2010, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$20,811,365

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$34,705,850
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film has four references to wineries that appear prominently in Sideways (2004). During the first family dinner scene, the label of the wine bottle on the table is Frass Canyon; Nic looks at it and asks Jules if there is any more Fiddlehead. Frass Canyon is the contrived name of the winery where Paul Giamatti's character in Sideways (Miles) drinks from the spittoon and then dumps the remaining liquid on his head. Miles and Virginia Madsen's character in Sideways (Maya) rave about the Fiddlehead Sauvignon Blanc that Maya is drinking when the two couples meet for dinner--immediately following the famous Merlot scene. When Paul visits Jules and Nic's home for the first time, he announces that he's brought a bottle of Petite Sirah; the label is from Kalyra, the winery where Sandra Oh's character in Sideways works and meets Jack (Thomas Haden Church). Just before the scene when Nic learns of Jules's affair, Paul excitedly tells Nic that he has a "killer" bottle of Alma Rosa Pinot Noir (and the Alma Rosa label appears on the bottle). Alma Rosa is the winery owned by Richard Sanford. At the time Sideways was filmed, Richard Sanford owned Sanford, the first winery stop for Miles and Jack where Miles waxes poetic about Sanford's Pinot Noir. Alma Rosa's tasting room was the Sanford tasting room that appeared in Sideways, and Chris Burroughs, the wine pourer at Sanford in the film, poured for Alma Rosa as recently as 2014. See more »

Goofs

When the family is waving goodbye to Joni at the college, Laser is clearly shown sitting on the right side of the car. In the next scene (the car trip home) he is sitting on the left side. See more »

Quotes

[last lines]
Laser: I don't think you guys should break up.
Nic: No? Why's that?
Laser: I think you're too old.
Nic: [wryly] Thanks, Laser.
[Jules grins and puts a hand on Nic's knee, and Nic covers the hand with her own]
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Crazy Credits

For Wendy and Calder. See more »

Connections

Referenced in 30 Rock: St. Patrick's Day (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Panic in Detroit
Written by David Bowie
Performed by David Bowie
Courtesy of RZO Music
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Domestic Life in THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT
25 February 2011 | by seaview1See all my reviews

The nuclear family takes on a different spin when both parents are same sex and the kids are the product of a male sperm donor in The Kids Are All Right. When traumatic upheaval and revelations strike such a family, the results can be amusing and also tragic. Annette Bening and Julianne Moore highlight an insightful script about domesticity turned on its head.

Nic (Bening) and Jules (Moore) are lesbian parents of two teens, Joni and Laser. One day the children research and contact their biological father, Paul (Mark Ruffalo), who agrees to meet his progeny. After an awkward first meeting, things actually go well as the new family connections are explored by the kids and their newly found father. The couple of Nic and Jules are a contrast; Nic is the physician who is totally controlling while Jules is still trying to find herself with a new business of landscaping. Laser hangs with the wrong crowd and begins to realize that he deserves better through his bond with Paul. Joni is trying to assert herself as an adult and prepares to go to college. The moms show a parental responsibility to watch over their children and want to meet the dad. When Paul hires Jules to do work on his restaurant landscape, the two connect. As Paul's influence begins to overcome the family, Nic feels left out. But there is an attraction between Jules and Paul that leads to a torrid affair, and when Nic discovers the truth, the family is torn apart. Into this mix are two maturing children whose emotions will be tested throughout.

The roles are well acted especially by Benning as a betrayed spouse, and in particular, her scene of revelation about Jules is a marvel of expressiveness and devastating heartbreak. This culminates in a powerful moment with all the principals present at Paul's dinner table. Moore gives solid support and shines in her heartfelt plea to her family near the end. The ensemble is well cast particularly Ruffalo whose almost bystander role is suddenly elevated to catalyst and disruptor of the family's dynamic.

The story has a nice balance of serious tones and comedic elements born out of the situations. The themes work on several levels like ingredients of a zesty recipe: the family chemistry, the couple of Nic and Jules, the kids' developing bond with Paul, Paul and Jules, and shake and mix well. Everyone has needs and wants, and the strongest is a need to belong to a family and the need to connect with another human being whether it be Laser and his friends, Paul and Jules, Paul and his children, and Nic and Jules. Amid the conflicts, no one escapes unscathed. There are no real heroes or villains here, only hard truths about life and relationships.

The fact that two lesbians are having the conflict over infidelity may seem novel on the surface, but it could easily have been a heterosexual couple. In fact the notion of two lesbians virtually disappears as we witness and understand this family unit with its warts and all. It could be any family when you think about it. The fact that both Benning and Moore play their respective spousal roles so convincingly is a testament to their acting skills playing off an excellent script by Stuart Blumberg and Lisa Cholodenko, who also directs. The ending rings true and shows not only how far the relationships have come, but how that foundation, despite some serious challenges, is strong enough to survive. Life moves on, and there is hope for the future.

There are not a lot of loose ends in this story although, toward the end, it would be nice to get a bit more resolution to Ruffalo's character. The film does contains a couple of brief explicit sex scenes without which this would essentially be a PG rated film. There is little to quibble about, and the viewer gets to experience one of the more insightful domestic dramas in recent years.


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