Lost (2004–2010)
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A Tale of Two Cities 

Jack, Kate and Sawyer are kidnapped by the Others, who reveal themselves as more sophisticated and savvy than anyone guessed.

Director:

Jack Bender

Writers:

Jeffrey Lieber (created by), J.J. Abrams (created by) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje ... Mr. Eko (credit only)
Naveen Andrews ... Sayid Jarrah (credit only)
Henry Ian Cusick ... Desmond Hume (credit only)
Emilie de Ravin ... Claire Littleton (credit only)
Michael Emerson ... Benjamin 'Ben' Linus
Matthew Fox ... Dr. Jack Shephard
Jorge Garcia ... Hugo 'Hurley' Reyes (credit only)
Josh Holloway ... James 'Sawyer' Ford
Daniel Dae Kim ... Jin-Soo Kwon (credit only)
Yunjin Kim ... Sun-Hwa Kwon (credit only)
Evangeline Lilly ... Katherine 'Kate' Austen
Elizabeth Mitchell ... Dr. Juliet Burke
Dominic Monaghan ... Charlie Pace (credit only)
Terry O'Quinn ... John Locke (credit only)
Kiele Sanchez ... Nikki Fernandez (credit only)
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Storyline

Jack, Kate and Sawyer are kidnapped by "The Others" and put in different environments. Kate has a shower, gets a dress and is invited to have breakfast on the beach with the leader Henry Gale (who identifies himself under his real name of Ben Linus); Sawyer is locked in a cage for wild animals and without food or water, being "awarded" when he hits a lever as if he were an animal; and Jack is locked in a sort of aquarium, being interrogated and controlled by his handler and the Others doctor, Juliet, who has a complete report about his life. Meanwhile, Jack recalls his divorce process with Sarah and how his desperation and rapid meltdown affected everyone around him, including his father. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Turkish

Release Date:

4 October 2006 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

O'ahu, Hawaii, USA

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the first episode that J.J. Abrams was directly involved in since the show's first season. See more »

Goofs

When Sawyer gets returned to his cage after the escape attempt, the lock is placed back on the cage as Juliette is approaching, but it never gets snapped closed. See more »

Quotes

Jack: Where are my friends? Tell me where my friends are!
Juliet: Come down from the table first.
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Crazy Credits

The producers gratefully acknowledge the cooperation of the people of Hawaii and their Aloha spirit. See more »

Connections

References Back to the Future (1985) See more »

Soundtracks

End Title
(uncredited)
Written by Michael Giacchino
Performed by The Hollywood Studio Symphony
See more »

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User Reviews

A Tale of Two Cities
2 November 2008 | by ametaphysicalsharkSee all my reviews

The first episode of season three has the show's trademark attention-grabbing, well-staged 'what the hell is going on?' season-opening scene, but it's really more an introduction to the experimental and not so well-received six episode long mini-season which aired in fall 2006. The bulk of season three certainly has a different feel and focus than the 'mini-season' (which is what even the producers/writers referred to it as), and is of a much higher quality in general. I'd consider "Not in Portland" the first episode of the 'real' season 3.

The opening scene is certainly quite nifty. It's certainly well-filmed and suspenseful, and although it was more predictable than the immense season two opener with Desmond in the hatch, it was still a great scene. The rest of the episode is significantly weaker, though, centered on pretty standard follow-up stuff showing us that Sawyer, Jack, and Kate are in cages. Ah, the start of one of the worst multi-episode story lines on the show (the worst?). It's all quite rubbish, the atmosphere they're clearly going for on the Hydra island just isn't working, even Giacchino's score sounds off somehow. Juliet is interesting and is introduced well, however, and is basically the saving grace of the majority of the episode.

The flashbacks aren't much better, focusing on a jealous Jack. There's barely any real character development here, very little of interest. I suppose seeing Christian is always a plus, but that's about it really. More 'drama' with Sarah Shepard... It's all quite boring and tired. This was J.J. Abrams' first script for the show (co-written with Damon Lindelof) since the pilot, and it's just not cohesive and interesting enough. I suppose that seeing Ben become Ben is fun, but there's not much of interest in this episode otherwise, mainly because it's introducing a storyline which is incredibly tiresome. It's watchable, but very far from great.

6/10


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